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Christ Church Rochester                                                    Epiphany  2017             The Song                                                                     vol. 2  issue 3

 

Word Made Flesh  T. Jutsum©2005 (pictured above)

 Lamb of God © 2016 David Jutsum(above) 

(below) Baptism of Jesus © James He Qi http://www.heqiart.com

 And the Word became flesh and lived among us, and we have seen his glory, the glory of the only begotten of the Father, full of grace and truth...No one has ever seen God. It is God the only Son, who is close to the Father’s heart, who has made him known. 

 
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editors letter


Editor note:

Sermon at Calvary Episcopal Church, January 8, 2017, baptism of Elijah James Marble

The Rev’d Steven T. Metcalfe

 

“And in the temple of the Lord, all are crying, ‘Glory’”.   How could we help but sing “Glory” when we allow our true, God given selves to shine in the shadows of worldly ignorance?  We cry “glory” today because here and throughout the Christian world we celebrate the “coming out”, so to speak, of the savior Jesus Christ.  Following in the footsteps of his Messianic enlightenment in baptism, we celebrate the baptism of one more precious soul, and maybe thousands throughout the world.  Here, Elijah James will be bound to Christ as a brother, an eternal child of God…..As have all of us. So many have sort of let their baptism lapse into routine religiosity-- at best.   How perilous it is to let our baptism slip away, ending up as a crumpled slip of paper in the back of that old junk drawer holding its treasure of parking tickets not paid, apologies not sent, and half burned candle stubs.  I can’t stress this enough: the world appears to be getting even murkier and more dangerous, signaling the time for this Body of Christ to wake up, “come out” of hiding, be the Glory which engulfs the forces of mayhem.

Inevitably, we think of ourselves as creatures of earth.  The product of this reasonable ignorance is obsession with what happens here in our societies.  Why would we imagine anything different? Ties to earth are extremely strong.  Born into families with other human beings, growing older, having experiences, caring for our bodies, contributing to the goings on in our world, living as an individual being among millions of other beings, it’s difficult to remember we are citizens of heaven. We’re unconsciously taught that “me” is what can be seen, touched, heard, smelled, or tasted.  Aren’t we defined mostly as a being “the person” who looks like this or that, thinks certain ways, seems to possess certain characteristics and qualities? Being formed of the earth, these bodies wear out or are damaged, peppering life with pain and loss, as attached as we are.

  Life itself seems to chain us to this half-truth about who we are.  You and I are more truly spiritual beings, sharing Universal Christ Consciousness, who have been baptized into the life of Christ, who is fully Love incarnate.  If we don’t own that, don’t long to have our minds “renewed” in his, as St. Paul puts it, if we cannot pull away from this ego-driven world which unconsciously spawns animosity, hunger for power and treachery of every sort, then our ties to Christ will certainly atrophy.

Holy Baptism is, in earthly terms, quite simple.  That’s because to the unopened eye it is only water, prayers, a little oil and a few snapshots. St. John says, “no one has ever seen God.” We cannot, in our physicality, experience The Holy One directly.  Whoever surrenders her life to Spirit, which shows up in love, compassion, empathy, forgiveness and acceptance, is guided by the Spirit.  God is spirit.  Whoever sees Christ in human life has surrendered to the power of this Spirit and also seen God, “In whom we live and move and have our being.”  Christ saves by revealing our shared life and welcoming us into eternal life with him in God.  That’s what happens in baptism.  Sort of.  If anyone could adequately translate Spiritual truth into human language, then all the mystery of unseen realities would have long ago been articulated, logged and universally accepted.  That has not and will not be possible.  What we do have are stories, liturgical drama, prayer and sacraments—instruments of God’s grace.

So, Elijah, by the grace of God, we are given the power to open the door of the spiritual world to you.  This is not really a place, but an attitude where love is all powerful.  No one wants to hurt another, there are no traps for the unwary, no punishments for the lost.  Come through the entrance of the life of grace which calls you to see yourself and others as God does.  You will be free to let your heart soar with gratitude for whatever life brings as everything and everyone will be your teacher.  You will know you are a precious, loved expression of the divine Self which creates, sustains and inspires.  You will also be hungry for wisdom, discerning what is love, what is not empathy, what is compassion, what is forgiveness and what is not accepting. Help us as we will help you not to squander the person you are in a desperate struggle for approval, power over others, and the pitiful pleasure of indulging your whims.

My friends, this morning, pay close attention to the baptismal vows and the renewal of our baptismal covenant.  These few words describe how citizens of heaven live in a world determined to lead us to destruction.  You are evidence that God still creates human beings, not smart, biological machines.  We all want a better world.   I do not believe that can be accomplished politically. I know no other way than to intend and welcome personal transformation, to be the person who, for himself, embraces the baptismal covenant as the guide for his life. That is probably all any of us can do.  All we can do?  Love is the unfathomable creative power of God.  That is what all of us can bring to our world to overwhelm the fury of human blindness.

Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. Let your gentleness be known to everyone. The Lord is near. Do not worry about anything, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God. And the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus. Finally, beloved, whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is pleasing, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence and if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things. Keep on doing the things that you have learned and received and heard and seen in me, and the God of peace will be with you.

Philippians 4:8 ff

editors letter


Editor note:

Sermon at Calvary Episcopal Church, January 8, 2017, baptism of Elijah James Marble

The Rev’d Steven T. Metcalfe

 

“And in the temple of the Lord, all are crying, ‘Glory’”.   How could we help but sing “Glory” when we allow our true, God given selves to shine in the shadows of worldly ignorance?  We cry “glory” today because here and throughout the Christian world we celebrate the “coming out”, so to speak, of the savior Jesus Christ.  Following in the footsteps of his Messianic enlightenment in baptism, we celebrate the baptism of one more precious soul, and maybe thousands throughout the world.  Here, Elijah James will be bound to Christ as a brother, an eternal child of God…..As have all of us. So many have sort of let their baptism lapse into routine religiosity-- at best.   How perilous it is to let our baptism slip away, ending up as a crumpled slip of paper in the back of that old junk drawer holding its treasure of parking tickets not paid, apologies not sent, and half burned candle stubs.  I can’t stress this enough: the world appears to be getting even murkier and more dangerous, signaling the time for this Body of Christ to wake up, “come out” of hiding, be the Glory which engulfs the forces of mayhem.

Inevitably, we think of ourselves as creatures of earth.  The product of this reasonable ignorance is obsession with what happens here in our societies.  Why would we imagine anything different? Ties to earth are extremely strong.  Born into families with other human beings, growing older, having experiences, caring for our bodies, contributing to the goings on in our world, living as an individual being among millions of other beings, it’s difficult to remember we are citizens of heaven. We’re unconsciously taught that “me” is what can be seen, touched, heard, smelled, or tasted.  Aren’t we defined mostly as a being “the person” who looks like this or that, thinks certain ways, seems to possess certain characteristics and qualities? Being formed of the earth, these bodies wear out or are damaged, peppering life with pain and loss, as attached as we are.

  Life itself seems to chain us to this half-truth about who we are.  You and I are more truly spiritual beings, sharing Universal Christ Consciousness, who have been baptized into the life of Christ, who is fully Love incarnate.  If we don’t own that, don’t long to have our minds “renewed” in his, as St. Paul puts it, if we cannot pull away from this ego-driven world which unconsciously spawns animosity, hunger for power and treachery of every sort, then our ties to Christ will certainly atrophy.

Holy Baptism is, in earthly terms, quite simple.  That’s because to the unopened eye it is only water, prayers, a little oil and a few snapshots. St. John says, “no one has ever seen God.” We cannot, in our physicality, experience The Holy One directly.  Whoever surrenders her life to Spirit, which shows up in love, compassion, empathy, forgiveness and acceptance, is guided by the Spirit.  God is spirit.  Whoever sees Christ in human life has surrendered to the power of this Spirit and also seen God, “In whom we live and move and have our being.”  Christ saves by revealing our shared life and welcoming us into eternal life with him in God.  That’s what happens in baptism.  Sort of.  If anyone could adequately translate Spiritual truth into human language, then all the mystery of unseen realities would have long ago been articulated, logged and universally accepted.  That has not and will not be possible.  What we do have are stories, liturgical drama, prayer and sacraments—instruments of God’s grace.

So, Elijah, by the grace of God, we are given the power to open the door of the spiritual world to you.  This is not really a place, but an attitude where love is all powerful.  No one wants to hurt another, there are no traps for the unwary, no punishments for the lost.  Come through the entrance of the life of grace which calls you to see yourself and others as God does.  You will be free to let your heart soar with gratitude for whatever life brings as everything and everyone will be your teacher.  You will know you are a precious, loved expression of the divine Self which creates, sustains and inspires.  You will also be hungry for wisdom, discerning what is love, what is not empathy, what is compassion, what is forgiveness and what is not accepting. Help us as we will help you not to squander the person you are in a desperate struggle for approval, power over others, and the pitiful pleasure of indulging your whims.

My friends, this morning, pay close attention to the baptismal vows and the renewal of our baptismal covenant.  These few words describe how citizens of heaven live in a world determined to lead us to destruction.  You are evidence that God still creates human beings, not smart, biological machines.  We all want a better world.   I do not believe that can be accomplished politically. I know no other way than to intend and welcome personal transformation, to be the person who, for himself, embraces the baptismal covenant as the guide for his life. That is probably all any of us can do.  All we can do?  Love is the unfathomable creative power of God.  That is what all of us can bring to our world to overwhelm the fury of human blindness.

Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. Let your gentleness be known to everyone. The Lord is near. Do not worry about anything, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God. And the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus. Finally, beloved, whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is pleasing, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence and if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things. Keep on doing the things that you have learned and received and heard and seen in me, and the God of peace will be with you.

Philippians 4:8 ff

Wandering Toward the Jordan River                                                                 Baptism of Jesus   Icon

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Ruth's page


                                               Rector's Notes

“For a star to be born, there is one thing that must happen: a gaseous nebula must collapse. 

So collapse. 

Crumble.

This is not your destruction. 

This is your birth.”

            Nikka Ursula

 

I feel so much compassion for the wise men who followed the star. When I was a child, my compassion surfaced as pity. No matter which crèche or nativity seen, I always read them the same: they were sad because the real king was this baby. And they had been told to give away the things that made them so kingly. To give them to the baby. Later in life my compassion surfaced as sympathy. They were the last to make it to the manger. The angels burst open the night sky with song and light for the shepherds, but not for the wise men. Far away from those angel lit skies, the wise men had to study and question all on their own the star that appeared. The slowness of their long journey seemed symbolic of the slowness of their understanding - punishment even, for living inside their heads as astrologers, as scholars.

Midlife opens a new perspective. They are wise because they don’t care about the knowledge they’ve amassed. Maybe at one point in their lives they did, but not now. These old men want to concede their power to the child – they don’t take it personally. They know that in every age there is an old order, and the old order must die to the new – they don’t take this personally, either.

They’ve lived long enough to know that true power is surrender. Surrender of possessions that otherwise possess us, whether those possessions are in our bank accounts or in our heads.  They know that every beginning is preceded by an ending, and they are comfortable enough in their own skin to be known in their period of history as “the ending.” 

And yet this changing of the guard at the manger will not mean a swift transition into the new order. Laying their crowns at the baby’s manger is not such a big deal.  What makes them wise, what makes them stand apart from everyone else, what makes them fit to be kings is how they are willing to live out the rest of their lives as strangers instead of kings. Leaving their crowns with the baby is the easy part. The hard part, the part they came all this way for, is the return journey. They won’t be the same after the manger experience (no one ever is). They won’t fit in. And they probably know that no one back home will listen to them, let alone believe them. There are journeys we make that are the stuff of legends, that are even Biblical in proportion. The journey of the magi, led by the star, is one of them.

 But it’s this other journey that fills me with compassion for the magi. It’s not so much that they won’t be the kings they once were but, (in the words of T.S. Elliot) they will live out the rest of their lives “no longer at ease in the old dispensation,” which is a hard way to live. And yet it’s the only life to live if you’ve seen and understood what the wise men have.

Maybe they’ll become prophets.

Ruth+

 

 

 

Ruth's page


                                               Rector's Notes

“For a star to be born, there is one thing that must happen: a gaseous nebula must collapse. 

So collapse. 

Crumble.

This is not your destruction. 

This is your birth.”

            Nikka Ursula

 

I feel so much compassion for the wise men who followed the star. When I was a child, my compassion surfaced as pity. No matter which crèche or nativity seen, I always read them the same: they were sad because the real king was this baby. And they had been told to give away the things that made them so kingly. To give them to the baby. Later in life my compassion surfaced as sympathy. They were the last to make it to the manger. The angels burst open the night sky with song and light for the shepherds, but not for the wise men. Far away from those angel lit skies, the wise men had to study and question all on their own the star that appeared. The slowness of their long journey seemed symbolic of the slowness of their understanding - punishment even, for living inside their heads as astrologers, as scholars.

Midlife opens a new perspective. They are wise because they don’t care about the knowledge they’ve amassed. Maybe at one point in their lives they did, but not now. These old men want to concede their power to the child – they don’t take it personally. They know that in every age there is an old order, and the old order must die to the new – they don’t take this personally, either.

They’ve lived long enough to know that true power is surrender. Surrender of possessions that otherwise possess us, whether those possessions are in our bank accounts or in our heads.  They know that every beginning is preceded by an ending, and they are comfortable enough in their own skin to be known in their period of history as “the ending.” 

And yet this changing of the guard at the manger will not mean a swift transition into the new order. Laying their crowns at the baby’s manger is not such a big deal.  What makes them wise, what makes them stand apart from everyone else, what makes them fit to be kings is how they are willing to live out the rest of their lives as strangers instead of kings. Leaving their crowns with the baby is the easy part. The hard part, the part they came all this way for, is the return journey. They won’t be the same after the manger experience (no one ever is). They won’t fit in. And they probably know that no one back home will listen to them, let alone believe them. There are journeys we make that are the stuff of legends, that are even Biblical in proportion. The journey of the magi, led by the star, is one of them.

 But it’s this other journey that fills me with compassion for the magi. It’s not so much that they won’t be the kings they once were but, (in the words of T.S. Elliot) they will live out the rest of their lives “no longer at ease in the old dispensation,” which is a hard way to live. And yet it’s the only life to live if you’ve seen and understood what the wise men have.

Maybe they’ll become prophets.

Ruth+

 

 

 

Light over Bethlehem 2003©T.Jutsum

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Stephen Kennedy


Christ Church Music Notes From Stephen

Program Report for Annual Meeting

 

Submitted to the parish by Stephen Kennedy January 13, 2017

Music Director

Christ Church Rochester

 

Goals from 2016 (ongoing in 2017)

 

1. Attract more people to Christ Church through our music program Goal on target

2. Raise the level of musicianship in CC ensembles Goal on target

3. Raise community awareness of our rich and diverse music program Goal on target

4. Foster the education and training of musicians in liturgical music skills Goal on target

5. Engage people from the larger community (non parishioners) to help fund

our music program Goal on target

6. Install professional microphones in the church to record CC Choir,

Youth Ensemble, Consort, CC liturgies, and concerts Not yet reached

7. Provide more opportunities for youth participation and involvement in

Liturgies through music Goal on target

8. Enhance the church’s acoustic in light of the Chancel repair and renovation Goal attained

9. Fundraising to support our parish music program Goal on target

10. Strengthen existing community collaborations and partnerships in music Goal on target

 

Opportunities for individuals to assist and contribute in our parish music program  

 

1. Compline ushers and Candle-lighters

2. Greeters at Tuesday Pipes to represent the parish

3. Volunteers to help send publicity to media via e-mail

4. Additional Youth Ensemble members

5. Additional Christ Church Choir members

6. People to help set up for Compline following the 11:00 a.m. Eucharist

7. People to assist in searching for grants and grant writing

 

Detailed information on above stated music program goals:

 

1.  Attract more people to Christ Church through our music program

We are preparing for the population increase of the East End and we want our new neighbors to find clear and irresistible reasons to call Christ Church home. We strive to attract these people through traditional as well as uncommon means.  Obviously, music is traditionally integral to our liturgy. However, our program goes much further.  It educates, captures the attention of the larger community, provides reasons for outsiders to donate funds to our parish, and collaborates with renowned institutions. Our musically rich and distinctive liturgies, ensembles for all ages, our building and acoustics, our partnership and collaboration with one of the world’s finest music schools, and Eastman’s two internationally significant pipe organs in our sanctuary are the major building blocks of this program.

Compline is perhaps the largest weekly congregation in the Diocese of Rochester. Compline attendance (October through April) from 2013-14 was 4,929. This number grew to 5,274 in 2015-16, and 2016-17 it is continuing the same trend in growth. Compline plate offering (marked for parish general operating income) from October 2015 to April 2016 was $3,630. Pru Kirkpatrick and Vicki McCutchon host fantastic Compline receptions each First Sunday of the month. These receptions provide a meeting place for newcomers, regulars, and musicians to interact and enjoy fellowship. Over the years, we have gained new parish members through their initial attraction to Compline.

Our Tuesday Pipes noon concert series collaboration with Eastman brings about 40-60 people into the Nave each week of the year.  Many have become faithful followers of this concert series and some have been attending other parish events and liturgies.  This group includes downtown office workers, students, retirees, and a regular contingent of disabled who find the organ and space to be a kind of necessary and uncommon therapy. This series provides an essential and important ingredient in the weekly lives of these attendees. David Hunt greets the public, hands out programs and parish information, schedules tours for groups, answers questions about the church and parish, and I give a welcome address on behalf of Christ Church.

We have also been enhancing avenues of communication with the parish, visitors, and the general public.  Deb Vanderbilt and I designed a new “Welcome to Christ Church” flyer, and I designed a new “Christ Church Music” flyer. Both are in full color with lots of photos and information on how to become active in the parish.  These flyers are available in the back of the church and in the hallways of the parish house. Vicki McCutchon, Val Jutsum and I have been working on the re-design of the church bulletin boards.  You will see more development on these as time progresses. We have a Friends of Music email list with a subscription of 311 people, 540 likes on the Schola Cantorum Facebook site, and 309 likes on the Christ Church Facebook site. Thanks to Pat Kingsley, Deb Vanderbilt, and Val Jutsum, we also communicate with people about parish music activities through our church website and The SONG.

We greatly appreciate everyone’s participation in music at Christ Church. Whether singing a chant or hymn, listening to a prelude or postlude, or honing a motet, we are all celebrating something important together as a family. We are grateful for the support and work of our Rector Ruth Ferguson, Wardens Josephine Dewey and Deborah Vanderbilt, the Vestry, Marianne sickles and Moses Roland.

 

2.  Raise the level of musicianship in CC ensembles

Raising the level of quality in our liturgical music ensembles benefits everyone. Striving to achieve this goal fosters interest and gives people a sense of accomplishment in doing what they love to do: making something beautiful for others.  This is a precious gift to give and to receive. Progress and improvement are contagious whether engaging in music performance or through the action of listening. It is clear that the level of musicianship in all CC ensembles has increased over the past few years.  This is essential to our education program for musicians, growing parish ensembles, and appropriately adorning our liturgies with the great music of our church traditions. We thank each member of our various parish ensembles for their dedication and commitment to their craft. Our program could not exist without their devotion to our cause and their contributions of time and talent. Beauty feeds the soul.  

 

3. Raise community awareness of our rich and diverse music program

This goal is also important for parish growth. Compline and the Schola Cantorum are extremely popular in the Rochester Community.  The Nave is nearly full each Sunday night with diverse people of all ages and faith backgrounds. Jeff Spevak, Arts and entertainment, Staff reporter from the D&C wrote about Compline in his “Resolutions for 2017.” Jeff stated that he is “going to visit places like the Memorial Art Gallery, Artisan Works, Christ Church for the Schola Cantorum Sunday-night Compline, and Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre for a Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra show. Not because I’m writing a story. But because I just want to go.” Rochester Magazine named Candlelight Concerts & Compline the “coolest, most unusual experience in the city…” The Schola procures community interest for the parish through concerts, recordings, and radio broadcasts. Our Compline Usher and Candle-lighter team made up of: Lucy Alonzo, Patti Blaine, Bruce Blaine, Greg Hammonds, Emily Hammonds, Joan Hunt, Kathryn Jospe, Pru Kirkpatrick, Lydia Kirkpatrick, John Kirkpatrick, Kristy Liddell, Kyle Liddell, Mary Schultz, Sonja Shelton, and Marti St. George is organized by Christopher Huebner. Some of these people also set up for Compline following the 11:00 a.m. Sunday Eucharist.  Christopher cares for all the candles and manages the Schola music library and music binders.  All of these people are key to making Compline happen at Christ Church. The richness and diversity of our music program enriches our community in vital ways, grows our church, affects students from all over the world who come here to study, and impacts the quality of church music nationally.

 

4. Foster the education and training of musicians in liturgical music skills

Since about 2007, Christ Church has fostered ministry in liturgical music training.  Our Liturgical Music Initiative provides our parish with opportunities to benefit from education grant money such as what we have received over the years from the Episcopal Diocese. In 2012, a bequest from Roy VanDelinder by way of the Rochester Community Foundation enabled us to establish our VanDelinder Fellows Program in collaboration with the Eastman School of Music. This program not only provides “on the job” training for future leaders in church music but also gives our parish unique and distinctive mission. Last year’s VanDelinder Prize winner was Jeremy Jelinek.  Jeremy is currently studying in Paris at the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique et de Danse as well as being a student of the School of Gregorian Chant of Paris. He will return to ESM next fall to continue his studies. In the two years before that, Käthe Wright Kaufman was the VanDelinder Prize winner.  Käthe is currently the Organ Scholar at Truro cathedral in Cornwall U.K. where she is furthering her studies in sacred music skills.  Käthe will return to ESM in the fall.  Current Fellows are Jiaqi Shao, Madeleine Woodworth, and Alden Wright. You may read more about them on the church website under VanDelinder Fellows.  We can celebrate our parish’s commitment to liturgical music training because it creates lasting change for the betterment of people’s lives.  This mission gives enrichment to parishioners and they are encouraged to become champions in providing formation to these young people in the Episcopal Church.  

5. Engage people from the larger community (non parishioners) to help fund our music program

We are attracting donors from outside the parish to help fund program goals.  In May of 2015, friends at Irondequoit United Church of Christ, who attend Compline faithfully, hosted a fundraiser concert for Christ Church’s Friends of Music Fund.  In April of 2016, we collaborated with noted musicologist Kerala Snyder in a fundraiser concert at Christ Church by reenactment of a historic model of a liturgical concert. Professor Snyder and Eastman Organ Faculty: Edoardo Bellotti, David Higgs, William Porter, and Nathan Laube donated their professional skills for this event. In 2015, a donor outside of New York funded our purchased of a Renaissance sackbut and promises to fund another instrument this year.  A donor has also come forward with a pledge to fund another recording of the Schola Cantorum. We thank everyone who has contributed to Christ Church’s Friends of Music fund.  Such generosity allows our program to enrich the lives of countless people through music. These gifts also help build a music program in which people want to take part.

 

6. Install professional microphones in the church to record CC Choir, Youth Ensemble, Consort, CC liturgies, and concerts

This goal has yet to be reached but is on our “wish list” and we would like to develop a plan to raise funds for it. Once we are able to make this happen, we will be able to make recordings of liturgies, concerts, and all parish ensembles more easily and at a greatly reduced expense.  A recording of congregational hymn singing in various historical styles would be wonderful and fitting given our distinctive instruments and position of being a liturgical music “laboratory.”

 

7. Provide more opportunities for youth participation and involvement in Liturgies through music

It is a continuing goal to expand the role of parish youth within our liturgies. Being that my position as music director is not a full-time position, I am not able to add the needed hours required for taking directorship of the Youth Ensemble.  However, our VanDelinder Fellows program facilitates directorship of this ensemble under my supervision. The Youth Ensemble learns: traditional hymns and music of the church, music reading skills, and enjoys fellowship.  The ensemble performs on third Sundays at the 11:00 a.m. Eucharist. On Advent IV of 2016, the youth of the parish participated in the first-ever dramatic interpretation of a Gospel within a Eucharist.  A team made up of Ruth our Rector, Shirley Ricker, Marrlee Burgess, and I, worked to create a script, choreography, and music for this event.  VanDelinder Fellows, Jiaqi Shao, Madeleine Woodworth, and Alden Wright rehearsed the youth in the music and the performance was deemed a great success based upon the positive feedback from members of the congregation. At the Christmas Eve 5:00 p.m. Eucharist, the Smith Family String Players: Benny, Reagan, Asa, Liam, and Clinton, played an arrangement of carols at the Communion and the Youth Ensemble (under the direction of Madeleine Woodworth) performed "Procession" and "This Little Babe" from "A Ceremony of Carols" by Benjamin Britten. Youth involved in this ensemble this liturgical year have been: Hope McGuckin, Hanna and Liza Sommers; Asa, Benny, Clinton, Liam, and Reagan Smith; and Alex and Eva Zanibbi.

 

8. Enhance the church’s acoustic in light of the Chancel repair and renovation

We thank Christ Church parishioners Jennifer Anstey, Josephine Dewey, Ruth Ferguson, David Higgs, Alan Jones, Valerie Jutsum, Hugh Kierig, William Porter, Deborah Vanderbilt and myself for being on this team. Also on this team was Cynthia Howk, Architectural Research Coordinator from the Landmark Society of Western New York. We all worked alongside Swiatek Studios to not only decorate the Chancel but to ensure that the acoustic was not compromised.  A nationally prominent acoustician was consulted and the end result left the acoustic slightly more “alive” in the higher frequencies.  This allows sung and spoken texts to be more prominent and clear.

 

9. Fundraising to support our parish music program

As stated under goal no. 5, fundraising concerts began in 2015 and will be an ongoing part of our fundraising for Friends of Music fund. We also receive income from the sale of Christ Church Schola and organ recordings. Since 2005, CD income is above $12,000.  These recordings not only provide the parish with income but they generate distinction for Christ Church and allow us to fund future recordings. Tracks from these recordings are highlighted in national radio broadcasts such as “Pipedreams” and “With Heart and Voice.  These recordings are sold all over the world under the NAXOS label.  However, Christ Church benefits financially from only the CDs that we sell through the church.  Please consider buying some of these recordings for your friends as gifts.

 

10. Strengthen existing community collaborations and partnerships in Music

Our collaborations and partnerships with the University of Rochester’s Eastman School of Music consist in part of:

A. Two distinctive pipe organs, one cabinet organ, and one portative organ: each used regularly in liturgies and concerts.

B. Tuesday Pipes (25-minute organ concert series) brings about 40-60 people into the church each week.  Many of these people are faithful attendees and are beginning to view Christ Church as a necessary component in their lives.

C. The Christ Church Schola Cantorum is a course at the Eastman School of music.  It may be an isolated situation for a parish ensemble to be a credited course at one of the world’s leading music schools.

D. Members of the Christ Church Choir participate as “lab choir” in one of Eastman’s Sacred Music Skills courses. They provide “real world” experience that is essential for contextual teaching.

Our collaborations and partnerships with the Rochester Area Community Foundation consists of The Roy E. VanDelinder, Jr. Fellowship Program at Christ Church Rochester

 

This exciting program offers vocational training and practical application in liturgical music skills for Eastman organ students who are pursuing a career in liturgical music. Fellows receive a scholarship for participating in this program, and a large cash prize is awarded each year to the Fellow who demonstrates the greatest diligence and achievement. Under the leadership of Music Director Stephen Kennedy, fellows receive training and experience in improvising, composing, arranging, hymn playing, anthem and motet accompaniment, chanting, conducting, and rehearsing choirs and instrumentalists. They also receive formation in the Episcopal Church, encouragement to be actively engaged in our parish community, and receive support from our church family.

Fellowship in Liturgical Organ Studies

The VanDelinder Committee selects the fellows based on their résumé, playing skills, and two letters of recommendation. Fellows receive a scholarship for the academic year. Fellows may participate in this program for up to three years but the VanDelinder Committee makes the selection of fellows each year.  

 

Prize in Liturgical Organ Skills

Each year, the VanDelinder Committee selects one acting fellow to receive the Roy E. VanDelinder, Jr. Prize in Liturgical Organ Skills that includes a large cash prize above the scholarship.

 

DESCRIPTION OF PARISH ENSEMBLES:

 

Christ Church Choir: This ensemble’s principal function is to sing for the 11:00 a.m. Sunday Eucharist. This auditioned choir builds upon a tradition of musical quality through a broad variety of musical styles. Repertoire includes Gregorian Chant, Anglican Chant, and motets from the Renaissance to the 21st century. Membership is drawn from parishioners of Christ Church as well as individuals from the Rochester community. Fellowship is also an important aspect of the choir. We are all grateful to Carlos Mercado for his tireless and essential work as CC Choir Librarian over the past many years.  Members names listed at the end of this document.

 

The Christ Church Youth Ensemble: This ensemble has grown to be larger than ever. The ensemble performs music in the 11:00 a.m. Eucharist on third Sundays of the month. Members learn traditional music of the Episcopal Church, sacred chant, hymns of the church, sacred motets, music reading skills, play instruments, and enjoy fellowship. VanDelinder Fellows direct the ensemble under the mentorship of the Music Director. Rehearsals are from 12:25 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. each Sunday. We thank all members and parents of this ensemble. Members are: Hope McGuckin, Hanna and Liza Sommers; Asa, Benny, Clinton, Liam, and Reagan Smith; and Alex and Eva Zanibbi.

 

The Christ Church Consort: Made up of parish members, Eastman School of Music students, RPO members, and professional musicians who play Renaissance and Baroque instruments. Instruments presently include gut-string violin, viola, violoncello, and sackbut (Renaissance trombone). Players are exposed to the traditions of the Episcopal Church and learn historic performance practice methods by performing early music repertoire with Christ Church ensembles and the Baroque organ. Players are: Aika Ito, Baroque Violin; Noah Fields, Baroque Viola, Ben David Aronson, Tenor Sackbut, and Glenna Curren, Baroque Cello.

 

Schola Cantorum: “The coolest, most unusual music experience in the city….” Rochester Magazine’s “Our Top Picks of 2014.” “The Christ Church Schola Cantorum … sings beautifully.” Fanfare, Jan/Feb 2010. The Christ Church Schola Cantorum was founded in 1997 by Stephen Kennedy for the purpose of performing the weekly Office of Compline at Christ Church. The intent was to provide a service to the community in which musical art and liturgy were seamlessly interwoven. Since its inception, the Schola has performed the Office of Compline each Sunday evening from October through April. This critically acclaimed ensemble also functions as an early music laboratory through engagement in known historic rehearsal and performance practices. The Schola specializes in Gregorian chant, choral music from the Renaissance and Baroque eras, and choral improvisation. Special thanks goes to Thatcher Lyman, Christ Church Music Scholar, for his assistant directorship, and to Christopher Huebner, Schola Librarian and Coordinator for the Schola. Members names listed at the end of this document.

 

Associate Organists

We are grateful to David Higgs and William Porter for contributing so generously of their talent and support to our parish and its music program.  They also help with mentoring and teaching our parish musicians and VanDelinder Fellows. We thank them for their ongoing support.

 

Members of the Christ Church Choir

 

Soprano

Pru Kirkpatrick

Kristy Liddell

Carol Manuel

Lisa Pigut

Hanna Sommers

Liza Sommers

Mary Anne Wickett

Madeleine Woodworth

 

Alto

Joan Hunt

Schultz Mary

Eleanor Peet

Jiaqi Shao

Sonja Shelton

Lydia Worboys

 

Tenor

David Kirkpatrick

Bruce Manuel

Benjamin Henderson

Thatcher Lyman

Carlos Mercado

Alden Wright

 

Bass

Benjamin Doane

John Kirkpatrick

Kyle Liddell

Steven Metcalfe

Evan Ritter

Adam Sadberry

 

Members of the Schola Cantorum

 

Soprano

Ava D'Agostino

Lydia Becker

Hana J. Cai

Glenna Curren

Meg Cutting

Kat Ekaterina Gorlova

Katie Harmer

Sarah McConnell

Amanda Mole

Jiaqi Shao (portative organ)

Amy Steinberg

Madeleine Woodworth

 

Alto/Countertenor

Daniel Guerola Benito

Nick Bulgarino (alto sackbut)

Naomi Gregory (organ)

Aika ito (historic violin)

Marc Laroussini

Professor Honey Meconi

Julian Petrallia

Owen Reid

Lydia Worboys

 

Tenor

Ben David Aronson (Tenor sackbut)

Daniel Chang

Benjamin Henderson

Chase Loomer

Thatcher Lyman (Assistant director

David Marshall

Chris Petit

Alden Wright

 

Bass

Lisa Albrecht (bass sackbut)

Mark Ballard

Oliver Brett (organ)

Noah Fields (and historic Viola)

Carl Galland

Aaron James

Benjamin Johns

John Kirkpatrick

Professor Michael E Ruhling

 

Christopher Huebner (Librarian and coordinator)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information about concerts and music events, please visit the Christ Church website: http://christchurchrochester.org/index.html.

 

 

Here are just a few ways in which Christ Church members and friends may participate in our initiative:

• Becoming an Usher/Candle-lighter for Compline on Sunday Nights

• Make contributions to our Friends of Music Fund. This fund supports music at Christ Church.  It also enables us to provide musical outreach to the Rochester community through music training programs, concerts, and enables us to enhance our liturgies with music.  

• Purchase our various CD recordings for friends and family members as gifts.

• Assist in publicizing music at Christ Church by helping sending emails to the local media

 

Please contact me if you are interested in participating in any aspect of our music program at Christ Church. Stephen Kennedy, Music Director stephenk@rochester.rr.com

 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

“Tuesday Pipes” at Christ Church: Every Tuesday, Eastman performers, faculty, and alumni will present a 25-minute lunchtime concert at Christ Church. Performances showcase the Craighead-Saunders Organ and Hook & Hastings Organ. Events begin at 12:10pm and are free and open to the public. For more information on the Tuesday Pipes series, please visit http://www.esm.rochester.edu/organ/events/

 

 

 

 

For more information about concerts and music events, please visit the Christ Church website: 

http://www.christchurchrochester.org/

You can also find the billboard of ongoing and special future events by going to the top of this section and clicking on the link "MUSIC GALLERY".

Here are just a few ways in which Christ Church members and friends may participate in our program:

• Becoming an Usher/Candle-lighter for Compline

• Make contributions to our Friends of Music Fund. This fund supports music at Christ Church.  It also enables us to provide musical outreach to the Rochester community through music-training programs, concerts, and enables us to enhance our liturgies with music.  

• Purchase our various CD recordings for friends and family members as gifts.

• Assist in publicizing music at Christ Church by helping sending emails to the local media

 

Please contact me if you are interested in participating in any aspect of our music program at Christ Church. Stephen Kennedy, Music Director stephenk@rochester.rr.com

 

You may also support our music education and enrichment opportunities for young musicians who are dedicating their lives to the field of sacred music by contributing to Christ Church’s "Friends of Music" fund.

Please continue to follow the musical life of our parish by reading the monthly Music Notes and Calendar that are emailed from my address  via MailChimp. 

-Click on the posters below for a full page view.

Stephen Kennedy


Christ Church Music Notes From Stephen

Program Report for Annual Meeting

 

Submitted to the parish by Stephen Kennedy January 13, 2017

Music Director

Christ Church Rochester

 

Goals from 2016 (ongoing in 2017)

 

1. Attract more people to Christ Church through our music program Goal on target

2. Raise the level of musicianship in CC ensembles Goal on target

3. Raise community awareness of our rich and diverse music program Goal on target

4. Foster the education and training of musicians in liturgical music skills Goal on target

5. Engage people from the larger community (non parishioners) to help fund

our music program Goal on target

6. Install professional microphones in the church to record CC Choir,

Youth Ensemble, Consort, CC liturgies, and concerts Not yet reached

7. Provide more opportunities for youth participation and involvement in

Liturgies through music Goal on target

8. Enhance the church’s acoustic in light of the Chancel repair and renovation Goal attained

9. Fundraising to support our parish music program Goal on target

10. Strengthen existing community collaborations and partnerships in music Goal on target

 

Opportunities for individuals to assist and contribute in our parish music program  

 

1. Compline ushers and Candle-lighters

2. Greeters at Tuesday Pipes to represent the parish

3. Volunteers to help send publicity to media via e-mail

4. Additional Youth Ensemble members

5. Additional Christ Church Choir members

6. People to help set up for Compline following the 11:00 a.m. Eucharist

7. People to assist in searching for grants and grant writing

 

Detailed information on above stated music program goals:

 

1.  Attract more people to Christ Church through our music program

We are preparing for the population increase of the East End and we want our new neighbors to find clear and irresistible reasons to call Christ Church home. We strive to attract these people through traditional as well as uncommon means.  Obviously, music is traditionally integral to our liturgy. However, our program goes much further.  It educates, captures the attention of the larger community, provides reasons for outsiders to donate funds to our parish, and collaborates with renowned institutions. Our musically rich and distinctive liturgies, ensembles for all ages, our building and acoustics, our partnership and collaboration with one of the world’s finest music schools, and Eastman’s two internationally significant pipe organs in our sanctuary are the major building blocks of this program.

Compline is perhaps the largest weekly congregation in the Diocese of Rochester. Compline attendance (October through April) from 2013-14 was 4,929. This number grew to 5,274 in 2015-16, and 2016-17 it is continuing the same trend in growth. Compline plate offering (marked for parish general operating income) from October 2015 to April 2016 was $3,630. Pru Kirkpatrick and Vicki McCutchon host fantastic Compline receptions each First Sunday of the month. These receptions provide a meeting place for newcomers, regulars, and musicians to interact and enjoy fellowship. Over the years, we have gained new parish members through their initial attraction to Compline.

Our Tuesday Pipes noon concert series collaboration with Eastman brings about 40-60 people into the Nave each week of the year.  Many have become faithful followers of this concert series and some have been attending other parish events and liturgies.  This group includes downtown office workers, students, retirees, and a regular contingent of disabled who find the organ and space to be a kind of necessary and uncommon therapy. This series provides an essential and important ingredient in the weekly lives of these attendees. David Hunt greets the public, hands out programs and parish information, schedules tours for groups, answers questions about the church and parish, and I give a welcome address on behalf of Christ Church.

We have also been enhancing avenues of communication with the parish, visitors, and the general public.  Deb Vanderbilt and I designed a new “Welcome to Christ Church” flyer, and I designed a new “Christ Church Music” flyer. Both are in full color with lots of photos and information on how to become active in the parish.  These flyers are available in the back of the church and in the hallways of the parish house. Vicki McCutchon, Val Jutsum and I have been working on the re-design of the church bulletin boards.  You will see more development on these as time progresses. We have a Friends of Music email list with a subscription of 311 people, 540 likes on the Schola Cantorum Facebook site, and 309 likes on the Christ Church Facebook site. Thanks to Pat Kingsley, Deb Vanderbilt, and Val Jutsum, we also communicate with people about parish music activities through our church website and The SONG.

We greatly appreciate everyone’s participation in music at Christ Church. Whether singing a chant or hymn, listening to a prelude or postlude, or honing a motet, we are all celebrating something important together as a family. We are grateful for the support and work of our Rector Ruth Ferguson, Wardens Josephine Dewey and Deborah Vanderbilt, the Vestry, Marianne sickles and Moses Roland.

 

2.  Raise the level of musicianship in CC ensembles

Raising the level of quality in our liturgical music ensembles benefits everyone. Striving to achieve this goal fosters interest and gives people a sense of accomplishment in doing what they love to do: making something beautiful for others.  This is a precious gift to give and to receive. Progress and improvement are contagious whether engaging in music performance or through the action of listening. It is clear that the level of musicianship in all CC ensembles has increased over the past few years.  This is essential to our education program for musicians, growing parish ensembles, and appropriately adorning our liturgies with the great music of our church traditions. We thank each member of our various parish ensembles for their dedication and commitment to their craft. Our program could not exist without their devotion to our cause and their contributions of time and talent. Beauty feeds the soul.  

 

3. Raise community awareness of our rich and diverse music program

This goal is also important for parish growth. Compline and the Schola Cantorum are extremely popular in the Rochester Community.  The Nave is nearly full each Sunday night with diverse people of all ages and faith backgrounds. Jeff Spevak, Arts and entertainment, Staff reporter from the D&C wrote about Compline in his “Resolutions for 2017.” Jeff stated that he is “going to visit places like the Memorial Art Gallery, Artisan Works, Christ Church for the Schola Cantorum Sunday-night Compline, and Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre for a Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra show. Not because I’m writing a story. But because I just want to go.” Rochester Magazine named Candlelight Concerts & Compline the “coolest, most unusual experience in the city…” The Schola procures community interest for the parish through concerts, recordings, and radio broadcasts. Our Compline Usher and Candle-lighter team made up of: Lucy Alonzo, Patti Blaine, Bruce Blaine, Greg Hammonds, Emily Hammonds, Joan Hunt, Kathryn Jospe, Pru Kirkpatrick, Lydia Kirkpatrick, John Kirkpatrick, Kristy Liddell, Kyle Liddell, Mary Schultz, Sonja Shelton, and Marti St. George is organized by Christopher Huebner. Some of these people also set up for Compline following the 11:00 a.m. Sunday Eucharist.  Christopher cares for all the candles and manages the Schola music library and music binders.  All of these people are key to making Compline happen at Christ Church. The richness and diversity of our music program enriches our community in vital ways, grows our church, affects students from all over the world who come here to study, and impacts the quality of church music nationally.

 

4. Foster the education and training of musicians in liturgical music skills

Since about 2007, Christ Church has fostered ministry in liturgical music training.  Our Liturgical Music Initiative provides our parish with opportunities to benefit from education grant money such as what we have received over the years from the Episcopal Diocese. In 2012, a bequest from Roy VanDelinder by way of the Rochester Community Foundation enabled us to establish our VanDelinder Fellows Program in collaboration with the Eastman School of Music. This program not only provides “on the job” training for future leaders in church music but also gives our parish unique and distinctive mission. Last year’s VanDelinder Prize winner was Jeremy Jelinek.  Jeremy is currently studying in Paris at the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique et de Danse as well as being a student of the School of Gregorian Chant of Paris. He will return to ESM next fall to continue his studies. In the two years before that, Käthe Wright Kaufman was the VanDelinder Prize winner.  Käthe is currently the Organ Scholar at Truro cathedral in Cornwall U.K. where she is furthering her studies in sacred music skills.  Käthe will return to ESM in the fall.  Current Fellows are Jiaqi Shao, Madeleine Woodworth, and Alden Wright. You may read more about them on the church website under VanDelinder Fellows.  We can celebrate our parish’s commitment to liturgical music training because it creates lasting change for the betterment of people’s lives.  This mission gives enrichment to parishioners and they are encouraged to become champions in providing formation to these young people in the Episcopal Church.  

5. Engage people from the larger community (non parishioners) to help fund our music program

We are attracting donors from outside the parish to help fund program goals.  In May of 2015, friends at Irondequoit United Church of Christ, who attend Compline faithfully, hosted a fundraiser concert for Christ Church’s Friends of Music Fund.  In April of 2016, we collaborated with noted musicologist Kerala Snyder in a fundraiser concert at Christ Church by reenactment of a historic model of a liturgical concert. Professor Snyder and Eastman Organ Faculty: Edoardo Bellotti, David Higgs, William Porter, and Nathan Laube donated their professional skills for this event. In 2015, a donor outside of New York funded our purchased of a Renaissance sackbut and promises to fund another instrument this year.  A donor has also come forward with a pledge to fund another recording of the Schola Cantorum. We thank everyone who has contributed to Christ Church’s Friends of Music fund.  Such generosity allows our program to enrich the lives of countless people through music. These gifts also help build a music program in which people want to take part.

 

6. Install professional microphones in the church to record CC Choir, Youth Ensemble, Consort, CC liturgies, and concerts

This goal has yet to be reached but is on our “wish list” and we would like to develop a plan to raise funds for it. Once we are able to make this happen, we will be able to make recordings of liturgies, concerts, and all parish ensembles more easily and at a greatly reduced expense.  A recording of congregational hymn singing in various historical styles would be wonderful and fitting given our distinctive instruments and position of being a liturgical music “laboratory.”

 

7. Provide more opportunities for youth participation and involvement in Liturgies through music

It is a continuing goal to expand the role of parish youth within our liturgies. Being that my position as music director is not a full-time position, I am not able to add the needed hours required for taking directorship of the Youth Ensemble.  However, our VanDelinder Fellows program facilitates directorship of this ensemble under my supervision. The Youth Ensemble learns: traditional hymns and music of the church, music reading skills, and enjoys fellowship.  The ensemble performs on third Sundays at the 11:00 a.m. Eucharist. On Advent IV of 2016, the youth of the parish participated in the first-ever dramatic interpretation of a Gospel within a Eucharist.  A team made up of Ruth our Rector, Shirley Ricker, Marrlee Burgess, and I, worked to create a script, choreography, and music for this event.  VanDelinder Fellows, Jiaqi Shao, Madeleine Woodworth, and Alden Wright rehearsed the youth in the music and the performance was deemed a great success based upon the positive feedback from members of the congregation. At the Christmas Eve 5:00 p.m. Eucharist, the Smith Family String Players: Benny, Reagan, Asa, Liam, and Clinton, played an arrangement of carols at the Communion and the Youth Ensemble (under the direction of Madeleine Woodworth) performed "Procession" and "This Little Babe" from "A Ceremony of Carols" by Benjamin Britten. Youth involved in this ensemble this liturgical year have been: Hope McGuckin, Hanna and Liza Sommers; Asa, Benny, Clinton, Liam, and Reagan Smith; and Alex and Eva Zanibbi.

 

8. Enhance the church’s acoustic in light of the Chancel repair and renovation

We thank Christ Church parishioners Jennifer Anstey, Josephine Dewey, Ruth Ferguson, David Higgs, Alan Jones, Valerie Jutsum, Hugh Kierig, William Porter, Deborah Vanderbilt and myself for being on this team. Also on this team was Cynthia Howk, Architectural Research Coordinator from the Landmark Society of Western New York. We all worked alongside Swiatek Studios to not only decorate the Chancel but to ensure that the acoustic was not compromised.  A nationally prominent acoustician was consulted and the end result left the acoustic slightly more “alive” in the higher frequencies.  This allows sung and spoken texts to be more prominent and clear.

 

9. Fundraising to support our parish music program

As stated under goal no. 5, fundraising concerts began in 2015 and will be an ongoing part of our fundraising for Friends of Music fund. We also receive income from the sale of Christ Church Schola and organ recordings. Since 2005, CD income is above $12,000.  These recordings not only provide the parish with income but they generate distinction for Christ Church and allow us to fund future recordings. Tracks from these recordings are highlighted in national radio broadcasts such as “Pipedreams” and “With Heart and Voice.  These recordings are sold all over the world under the NAXOS label.  However, Christ Church benefits financially from only the CDs that we sell through the church.  Please consider buying some of these recordings for your friends as gifts.

 

10. Strengthen existing community collaborations and partnerships in Music

Our collaborations and partnerships with the University of Rochester’s Eastman School of Music consist in part of:

A. Two distinctive pipe organs, one cabinet organ, and one portative organ: each used regularly in liturgies and concerts.

B. Tuesday Pipes (25-minute organ concert series) brings about 40-60 people into the church each week.  Many of these people are faithful attendees and are beginning to view Christ Church as a necessary component in their lives.

C. The Christ Church Schola Cantorum is a course at the Eastman School of music.  It may be an isolated situation for a parish ensemble to be a credited course at one of the world’s leading music schools.

D. Members of the Christ Church Choir participate as “lab choir” in one of Eastman’s Sacred Music Skills courses. They provide “real world” experience that is essential for contextual teaching.

Our collaborations and partnerships with the Rochester Area Community Foundation consists of The Roy E. VanDelinder, Jr. Fellowship Program at Christ Church Rochester

 

This exciting program offers vocational training and practical application in liturgical music skills for Eastman organ students who are pursuing a career in liturgical music. Fellows receive a scholarship for participating in this program, and a large cash prize is awarded each year to the Fellow who demonstrates the greatest diligence and achievement. Under the leadership of Music Director Stephen Kennedy, fellows receive training and experience in improvising, composing, arranging, hymn playing, anthem and motet accompaniment, chanting, conducting, and rehearsing choirs and instrumentalists. They also receive formation in the Episcopal Church, encouragement to be actively engaged in our parish community, and receive support from our church family.

Fellowship in Liturgical Organ Studies

The VanDelinder Committee selects the fellows based on their résumé, playing skills, and two letters of recommendation. Fellows receive a scholarship for the academic year. Fellows may participate in this program for up to three years but the VanDelinder Committee makes the selection of fellows each year.  

 

Prize in Liturgical Organ Skills

Each year, the VanDelinder Committee selects one acting fellow to receive the Roy E. VanDelinder, Jr. Prize in Liturgical Organ Skills that includes a large cash prize above the scholarship.

 

DESCRIPTION OF PARISH ENSEMBLES:

 

Christ Church Choir: This ensemble’s principal function is to sing for the 11:00 a.m. Sunday Eucharist. This auditioned choir builds upon a tradition of musical quality through a broad variety of musical styles. Repertoire includes Gregorian Chant, Anglican Chant, and motets from the Renaissance to the 21st century. Membership is drawn from parishioners of Christ Church as well as individuals from the Rochester community. Fellowship is also an important aspect of the choir. We are all grateful to Carlos Mercado for his tireless and essential work as CC Choir Librarian over the past many years.  Members names listed at the end of this document.

 

The Christ Church Youth Ensemble: This ensemble has grown to be larger than ever. The ensemble performs music in the 11:00 a.m. Eucharist on third Sundays of the month. Members learn traditional music of the Episcopal Church, sacred chant, hymns of the church, sacred motets, music reading skills, play instruments, and enjoy fellowship. VanDelinder Fellows direct the ensemble under the mentorship of the Music Director. Rehearsals are from 12:25 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. each Sunday. We thank all members and parents of this ensemble. Members are: Hope McGuckin, Hanna and Liza Sommers; Asa, Benny, Clinton, Liam, and Reagan Smith; and Alex and Eva Zanibbi.

 

The Christ Church Consort: Made up of parish members, Eastman School of Music students, RPO members, and professional musicians who play Renaissance and Baroque instruments. Instruments presently include gut-string violin, viola, violoncello, and sackbut (Renaissance trombone). Players are exposed to the traditions of the Episcopal Church and learn historic performance practice methods by performing early music repertoire with Christ Church ensembles and the Baroque organ. Players are: Aika Ito, Baroque Violin; Noah Fields, Baroque Viola, Ben David Aronson, Tenor Sackbut, and Glenna Curren, Baroque Cello.

 

Schola Cantorum: “The coolest, most unusual music experience in the city….” Rochester Magazine’s “Our Top Picks of 2014.” “The Christ Church Schola Cantorum … sings beautifully.” Fanfare, Jan/Feb 2010. The Christ Church Schola Cantorum was founded in 1997 by Stephen Kennedy for the purpose of performing the weekly Office of Compline at Christ Church. The intent was to provide a service to the community in which musical art and liturgy were seamlessly interwoven. Since its inception, the Schola has performed the Office of Compline each Sunday evening from October through April. This critically acclaimed ensemble also functions as an early music laboratory through engagement in known historic rehearsal and performance practices. The Schola specializes in Gregorian chant, choral music from the Renaissance and Baroque eras, and choral improvisation. Special thanks goes to Thatcher Lyman, Christ Church Music Scholar, for his assistant directorship, and to Christopher Huebner, Schola Librarian and Coordinator for the Schola. Members names listed at the end of this document.

 

Associate Organists

We are grateful to David Higgs and William Porter for contributing so generously of their talent and support to our parish and its music program.  They also help with mentoring and teaching our parish musicians and VanDelinder Fellows. We thank them for their ongoing support.

 

Members of the Christ Church Choir

 

Soprano

Pru Kirkpatrick

Kristy Liddell

Carol Manuel

Lisa Pigut

Hanna Sommers

Liza Sommers

Mary Anne Wickett

Madeleine Woodworth

 

Alto

Joan Hunt

Schultz Mary

Eleanor Peet

Jiaqi Shao

Sonja Shelton

Lydia Worboys

 

Tenor

David Kirkpatrick

Bruce Manuel

Benjamin Henderson

Thatcher Lyman

Carlos Mercado

Alden Wright

 

Bass

Benjamin Doane

John Kirkpatrick

Kyle Liddell

Steven Metcalfe

Evan Ritter

Adam Sadberry

 

Members of the Schola Cantorum

 

Soprano

Ava D'Agostino

Lydia Becker

Hana J. Cai

Glenna Curren

Meg Cutting

Kat Ekaterina Gorlova

Katie Harmer

Sarah McConnell

Amanda Mole

Jiaqi Shao (portative organ)

Amy Steinberg

Madeleine Woodworth

 

Alto/Countertenor

Daniel Guerola Benito

Nick Bulgarino (alto sackbut)

Naomi Gregory (organ)

Aika ito (historic violin)

Marc Laroussini

Professor Honey Meconi

Julian Petrallia

Owen Reid

Lydia Worboys

 

Tenor

Ben David Aronson (Tenor sackbut)

Daniel Chang

Benjamin Henderson

Chase Loomer

Thatcher Lyman (Assistant director

David Marshall

Chris Petit

Alden Wright

 

Bass

Lisa Albrecht (bass sackbut)

Mark Ballard

Oliver Brett (organ)

Noah Fields (and historic Viola)

Carl Galland

Aaron James

Benjamin Johns

John Kirkpatrick

Professor Michael E Ruhling

 

Christopher Huebner (Librarian and coordinator)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information about concerts and music events, please visit the Christ Church website: http://christchurchrochester.org/index.html.

 

 

Here are just a few ways in which Christ Church members and friends may participate in our initiative:

• Becoming an Usher/Candle-lighter for Compline on Sunday Nights

• Make contributions to our Friends of Music Fund. This fund supports music at Christ Church.  It also enables us to provide musical outreach to the Rochester community through music training programs, concerts, and enables us to enhance our liturgies with music.  

• Purchase our various CD recordings for friends and family members as gifts.

• Assist in publicizing music at Christ Church by helping sending emails to the local media

 

Please contact me if you are interested in participating in any aspect of our music program at Christ Church. Stephen Kennedy, Music Director stephenk@rochester.rr.com

 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

“Tuesday Pipes” at Christ Church: Every Tuesday, Eastman performers, faculty, and alumni will present a 25-minute lunchtime concert at Christ Church. Performances showcase the Craighead-Saunders Organ and Hook & Hastings Organ. Events begin at 12:10pm and are free and open to the public. For more information on the Tuesday Pipes series, please visit http://www.esm.rochester.edu/organ/events/

 

 

 

 

For more information about concerts and music events, please visit the Christ Church website: 

http://www.christchurchrochester.org/

You can also find the billboard of ongoing and special future events by going to the top of this section and clicking on the link "MUSIC GALLERY".

Here are just a few ways in which Christ Church members and friends may participate in our program:

• Becoming an Usher/Candle-lighter for Compline

• Make contributions to our Friends of Music Fund. This fund supports music at Christ Church.  It also enables us to provide musical outreach to the Rochester community through music-training programs, concerts, and enables us to enhance our liturgies with music.  

• Purchase our various CD recordings for friends and family members as gifts.

• Assist in publicizing music at Christ Church by helping sending emails to the local media

 

Please contact me if you are interested in participating in any aspect of our music program at Christ Church. Stephen Kennedy, Music Director stephenk@rochester.rr.com

 

You may also support our music education and enrichment opportunities for young musicians who are dedicating their lives to the field of sacred music by contributing to Christ Church’s "Friends of Music" fund.

Please continue to follow the musical life of our parish by reading the monthly Music Notes and Calendar that are emailed from my address  via MailChimp. 

-Click on the posters below for a full page view.

Donate

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The music sound files contained here are from the new CD recordings that have just been released. These recordings are available for purchase by clicking the link below. The music used in this publication is edited.  

http://www.christchurchrochester.org/recordings-cd-shop

 

Other links of interest are:

https://www.facebook.com/ccscholacantorum/?fref=ts

https://www.facebook.com/ChristChurchRochester/?fref=ts

http://www.christchurchrochester.org

 

Please click on the word "TOP" just below. It will take you back to the top of the opening page. From there please click on the words in the upper right side of the page to explore additional articles, news and events. There is also a photo gallery and many other wonderful things to see. The links are called:

"SONG"   "NEWS & EVENTS"  CHAPEL GALLERY"  MUSIC EVENT GALLERY"  "CONTACT"    "ARCHIVE"

The "CONTACT" page is also a place to leave comments or requests. The "ARCHIVE" page will show you past issues. 

End


The music sound files contained here are from the new CD recordings that have just been released. These recordings are available for purchase by clicking the link below. The music used in this publication is edited.  

http://www.christchurchrochester.org/recordings-cd-shop

 

Other links of interest are:

https://www.facebook.com/ccscholacantorum/?fref=ts

https://www.facebook.com/ChristChurchRochester/?fref=ts

http://www.christchurchrochester.org

 

Please click on the word "TOP" just below. It will take you back to the top of the opening page. From there please click on the words in the upper right side of the page to explore additional articles, news and events. There is also a photo gallery and many other wonderful things to see. The links are called:

"SONG"   "NEWS & EVENTS"  CHAPEL GALLERY"  MUSIC EVENT GALLERY"  "CONTACT"    "ARCHIVE"

The "CONTACT" page is also a place to leave comments or requests. The "ARCHIVE" page will show you past issues.