IMG_9184.png
tempest (2006).png
IMG_3622.JPG
Community Music Notes and calendar October 2016.png
IMG_9184.png

Home


SCROLL DOWN

Home


Christ Church Rochester                                          Advent   2016              The Song                                                                     vol. 2    issue 1

 

 Coming Home ©2015 Renate Eckart (pictured above)

Lo! He Comes © 2005 Tim Jutsum  (above) acrylic on canvas

Tempest © 2004 Tim Jutsum (below) acrylic on canvas

Lo! he comes, with clouds descending,
once for our salvation slain;
thousand thousand saints attending
swell the triumph of his train: 
Alleluia! alleluia! alleluia!
Christ the Lord returns to reign.

 

Lo! He comes with clouds descending

Hymn   58       The 1982 Episcopal Hymnal

 

 

 

 
Donate
tempest (2006).png

editors letter


Editor note:

Advent

Happy New Year!  

We have the elegant tradition of beginning the liturgical year with the season of Advent. I love that it is an ancient, quiet, contemplative enclave. I love that, at it’s core, it vibrates with the anticipation of the conclusion of the current space-time experience. I love that this epoch will end when God proclaims that it is completed and it will be replaced with mysterious perfection. It is the astonishing satisfaction of our longing.  It is at the heart of where our Home is.

 

The last vestry meeting was shared by many parishioners who are not on the vestry, We talked of our concerns around hate speech and the potential for harm or injustice inflicted on people because of their beliefs, their race, their nationality, or their identity as LGBTQ. There was an urgent sense that the election and the language used, by now President elect Trump, might yet inspire civil strife. There was a very real sense that many of us were grappling with a way to manage our feelings that was consistent with our calling as people of faith.

 

The actions of God’s people embrace the actions of Jesus.  A GoogleGroup was formed called SanctuaryatChristChurch. Anyone interested can join and be informed of various ways to participate. You should have received an email from Deb Vanderbilt. Feel free to email Deb at dvanderbilt@sjfc.edu if you didn’t get an invitation.

 

We long for the triumph of God breaking the final barrier between this world, which has pain, illness, grief, evil, sin and death baked right in, and the radically different unimaginable new world in which we will be at home. Meanwhile, there is work to do that keeps us busy sharing God’s kingdom on earth as it is in heaven. 

 

Wonderfully, while engaged in our day to day, we get glimpses of this glory, like flashing sunlight reflected on water, and that feeds our hope. Hope is a requirement for life just like food and air. It is a gift of God, the Spirit. Hope does not disappoint us. The weight of that is breathtaking to me. We are working together, in this beautiful space of Christ Church surrounded by enrapturing music and art, to practice living our lives connected in Christ, to each other, and the world in which we find ourselves. 

 

Val Jutsum

 

SCROLL DOWN

editors letter


Editor note:

Advent

Happy New Year!  

We have the elegant tradition of beginning the liturgical year with the season of Advent. I love that it is an ancient, quiet, contemplative enclave. I love that, at it’s core, it vibrates with the anticipation of the conclusion of the current space-time experience. I love that this epoch will end when God proclaims that it is completed and it will be replaced with mysterious perfection. It is the astonishing satisfaction of our longing.  It is at the heart of where our Home is.

 

The last vestry meeting was shared by many parishioners who are not on the vestry, We talked of our concerns around hate speech and the potential for harm or injustice inflicted on people because of their beliefs, their race, their nationality, or their identity as LGBTQ. There was an urgent sense that the election and the language used, by now President elect Trump, might yet inspire civil strife. There was a very real sense that many of us were grappling with a way to manage our feelings that was consistent with our calling as people of faith.

 

The actions of God’s people embrace the actions of Jesus.  A GoogleGroup was formed called SanctuaryatChristChurch. Anyone interested can join and be informed of various ways to participate. You should have received an email from Deb Vanderbilt. Feel free to email Deb at dvanderbilt@sjfc.edu if you didn’t get an invitation.

 

We long for the triumph of God breaking the final barrier between this world, which has pain, illness, grief, evil, sin and death baked right in, and the radically different unimaginable new world in which we will be at home. Meanwhile, there is work to do that keeps us busy sharing God’s kingdom on earth as it is in heaven. 

 

Wonderfully, while engaged in our day to day, we get glimpses of this glory, like flashing sunlight reflected on water, and that feeds our hope. Hope is a requirement for life just like food and air. It is a gift of God, the Spirit. Hope does not disappoint us. The weight of that is breathtaking to me. We are working together, in this beautiful space of Christ Church surrounded by enrapturing music and art, to practice living our lives connected in Christ, to each other, and the world in which we find ourselves. 

 

Val Jutsum

 

IMG_3622.JPG

Ruth's page


                                               Rector's Notes

Pray for the peace of Jerusalem. Psalm 122 was a pilgrimage song sung by the multitudes who left their villages to pilgrim to Jerusalem for the annual holy days. These pilgrimages were recurring liturgical events (like Advent), and fraught with meaning - the holy days, the pilgrimage, and above all, the city, the gathering place where the brothers and sisters of Israel would be in communion with each other before the dwelling place of God. The peace of Jerusalem was a burning concern for the psalmist and for those who sang it.

 

Shaalu shelom yerusalayim. Pray for the peace of Jerusalem, a city whose name itself is built on the Hebrew shalom, peace. A city sacred to all three of the world’s monotheistic religions, a symbol of peace to Judaism, Christianity and Islam, and yet a city that has proven throughout history to be one of the most fought over cities of the world. A city that had seen major military campaigns - wars fought in and across Palestine and against, or in the vicinity of Jerusalem well before Jesus was born.  Jesus himself prayed psalm 122 on his arrival to Jerusalem for Passover, before he wept over it and the warfare that would demand even his execution : O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, the city that kills the prophets and stones those who are sent to it! How often would I have gathered your children together as a hen gathers her brood under her wings, and you were not willing! Pray for the peace of Jerusalem, shaalu shelom yerusalayim.

 

How do Christians pray for a city that has become an epicenter of world tensions? How shall we pray for the peace of Jerusalem when we know that whatever peace the people of that occupying and occupied land might know is, in the words of Methodist pastor, James Howell, as “transient as the success of armed security?” When the “peace” of Jerusalem is as “ fragile as the temperament of the next shooter, stabber, or suicide bomber?” It is the first Sunday of Advent, we are watching and waiting for the Prince of Peace, and blanching over Jerusalem is not an option. Not to pray for the peace of Jerusalem (or Aleppo, or Kabul, or Fallujah) is never an option. How do we believe there will peace in Jerusalem or anywhere in an era of military conflict and international mistrust – in an era of nationalism the world over? Shaalu shelom yerusalayim. How? Why? My first prayer would be that my own nation learn to beat its swords into plowshares. It is good to listen to Jesus’ followers who know and teach about prayer. I think of Henri Nouwen.

 

Henri Nouwen grew up in the Netherlands where wagon wheels decorated the entrances of farms or the walls of restaurants. These wagon wheels imbedded themselves in his psyche with their wide rims, strong wooden spokes and big hubs. “These wheels,” he said, “help me understand the importance of a life lived from the center. When I move along the rim, I can reach one spoke after the other, but when I stay at the hub, I am in touch with all the spokes at once...to pray is to move to the center of all life and all love.” This helps me to understand, “Pray for the peace of Jerusalem.” It helps me envision the lone heart of the ancient psalmist, whose heart was the hub of a prayer that expanded and became a prayer for, and a prayer of, every child of war, every refugee swimming from the smuggler’s boat for his life. “I think of the hub as my own heart,” Henri Nouwen wrote, “and as the heart of God, and the heart of the world. When I pray,” he wrote, “ I enter into the depth of my own heart and find there the heart of God who speaks to me of love. And I recognize right there the place where all of my sisters and brothers are in communion with each other.”

 

Pray for the peace of Jerusalem. Pray for every family displaced and detained, every living and every dead body pulled out of the rubble, pray for all humanity whose body and heart have been constrained by borders of nationalism, unable to hope, much less believe, that all nations shall stream to the mountain of the Lord’s house, and nation shall not lift up sword against nation.” Pray for the peace of Jerusalem, the place and the time where all of our brothers and sisters are in communion with each other, where flies no flag of any nation because the nation shall not raise up flag over nations. Pray for the coming of this judge and whose mishpat is judgment in favor of the vulnerable – the exiled, the poor, the workers whose families are still hungry – all who are turned away by the judgment of human laws. Pray for a Jerusalem whose peace is born of God’s justice is biased in favor of each pilgrim who seeks Jerusalem.. wherever Jerusalem may be. Shaalu shelom yerusalayim.  

 

They shall beat their swords into plowshares and their spears into pruning hooks. This is God’s vision of peace – pray for this. For this, we have to pray with our hands, with our labor,

fashioning our weapons into tools for harvesting food so that no one will have to go hungry.

 

Shaalu shelom yerusalayim, the hub which is the heart of God’s vision, the heart of God. “The great paradox of the spiritual life is, indeed, that the most personal is most universal,” Henri Nouwen wrote, “and the most intimate is most communal, and that the most contemplative is the most active. The wagon wheel shows that the hub is the center of all energy and movement, even when it seems not to be moving at all. In God all action and all rest are one. So too is prayer.” So we pray for the peace of Jerusalem simply by longing for it, by holding out hope that God’s reign, though it is not a prediction about a specific time, is yet an announcement of a truth yet to fully unfold in our sight, an announcement of a God who is Himself unfolding before our eyes even where we can’t see him. How does the Church pray for the peace of Jerusalem? By admitting that it sees now in a mirror dimly, but will see some day face to face, that it knows now only in part. By keeping the faith of Advent: that thought the kingdom has come, yet it will come; that though the kingdom will come, yet it has come.

 

We pray for the peace of Jerusalem by our joining our vision to God’s: Then I saw a new heaven and a new earth, for the first heaven and the first earth had passed away, and there was no longer any sea. I saw the holy city, the new Jerusalem, a new Aleppo, a new Rochester - coming down out of heaven from God..and I heard a loud voice from the throne saying, “Look! God’s dwelling place is now among man, and he will dwell with them. They will not rape the earth with gas pipelines nor desecrate what is sacred, they will know no suicide bombs, and no borders of nationalism; they will turn their weapons into tools for harvesting food, They will be his people, and God himself will be with them and will be their God.”

 

Ruth+

sermon for Advent 1 2016     November 27

SCROLL DOWN

Ruth's page


                                               Rector's Notes

Pray for the peace of Jerusalem. Psalm 122 was a pilgrimage song sung by the multitudes who left their villages to pilgrim to Jerusalem for the annual holy days. These pilgrimages were recurring liturgical events (like Advent), and fraught with meaning - the holy days, the pilgrimage, and above all, the city, the gathering place where the brothers and sisters of Israel would be in communion with each other before the dwelling place of God. The peace of Jerusalem was a burning concern for the psalmist and for those who sang it.

 

Shaalu shelom yerusalayim. Pray for the peace of Jerusalem, a city whose name itself is built on the Hebrew shalom, peace. A city sacred to all three of the world’s monotheistic religions, a symbol of peace to Judaism, Christianity and Islam, and yet a city that has proven throughout history to be one of the most fought over cities of the world. A city that had seen major military campaigns - wars fought in and across Palestine and against, or in the vicinity of Jerusalem well before Jesus was born.  Jesus himself prayed psalm 122 on his arrival to Jerusalem for Passover, before he wept over it and the warfare that would demand even his execution : O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, the city that kills the prophets and stones those who are sent to it! How often would I have gathered your children together as a hen gathers her brood under her wings, and you were not willing! Pray for the peace of Jerusalem, shaalu shelom yerusalayim.

 

How do Christians pray for a city that has become an epicenter of world tensions? How shall we pray for the peace of Jerusalem when we know that whatever peace the people of that occupying and occupied land might know is, in the words of Methodist pastor, James Howell, as “transient as the success of armed security?” When the “peace” of Jerusalem is as “ fragile as the temperament of the next shooter, stabber, or suicide bomber?” It is the first Sunday of Advent, we are watching and waiting for the Prince of Peace, and blanching over Jerusalem is not an option. Not to pray for the peace of Jerusalem (or Aleppo, or Kabul, or Fallujah) is never an option. How do we believe there will peace in Jerusalem or anywhere in an era of military conflict and international mistrust – in an era of nationalism the world over? Shaalu shelom yerusalayim. How? Why? My first prayer would be that my own nation learn to beat its swords into plowshares. It is good to listen to Jesus’ followers who know and teach about prayer. I think of Henri Nouwen.

 

Henri Nouwen grew up in the Netherlands where wagon wheels decorated the entrances of farms or the walls of restaurants. These wagon wheels imbedded themselves in his psyche with their wide rims, strong wooden spokes and big hubs. “These wheels,” he said, “help me understand the importance of a life lived from the center. When I move along the rim, I can reach one spoke after the other, but when I stay at the hub, I am in touch with all the spokes at once...to pray is to move to the center of all life and all love.” This helps me to understand, “Pray for the peace of Jerusalem.” It helps me envision the lone heart of the ancient psalmist, whose heart was the hub of a prayer that expanded and became a prayer for, and a prayer of, every child of war, every refugee swimming from the smuggler’s boat for his life. “I think of the hub as my own heart,” Henri Nouwen wrote, “and as the heart of God, and the heart of the world. When I pray,” he wrote, “ I enter into the depth of my own heart and find there the heart of God who speaks to me of love. And I recognize right there the place where all of my sisters and brothers are in communion with each other.”

 

Pray for the peace of Jerusalem. Pray for every family displaced and detained, every living and every dead body pulled out of the rubble, pray for all humanity whose body and heart have been constrained by borders of nationalism, unable to hope, much less believe, that all nations shall stream to the mountain of the Lord’s house, and nation shall not lift up sword against nation.” Pray for the peace of Jerusalem, the place and the time where all of our brothers and sisters are in communion with each other, where flies no flag of any nation because the nation shall not raise up flag over nations. Pray for the coming of this judge and whose mishpat is judgment in favor of the vulnerable – the exiled, the poor, the workers whose families are still hungry – all who are turned away by the judgment of human laws. Pray for a Jerusalem whose peace is born of God’s justice is biased in favor of each pilgrim who seeks Jerusalem.. wherever Jerusalem may be. Shaalu shelom yerusalayim.  

 

They shall beat their swords into plowshares and their spears into pruning hooks. This is God’s vision of peace – pray for this. For this, we have to pray with our hands, with our labor,

fashioning our weapons into tools for harvesting food so that no one will have to go hungry.

 

Shaalu shelom yerusalayim, the hub which is the heart of God’s vision, the heart of God. “The great paradox of the spiritual life is, indeed, that the most personal is most universal,” Henri Nouwen wrote, “and the most intimate is most communal, and that the most contemplative is the most active. The wagon wheel shows that the hub is the center of all energy and movement, even when it seems not to be moving at all. In God all action and all rest are one. So too is prayer.” So we pray for the peace of Jerusalem simply by longing for it, by holding out hope that God’s reign, though it is not a prediction about a specific time, is yet an announcement of a truth yet to fully unfold in our sight, an announcement of a God who is Himself unfolding before our eyes even where we can’t see him. How does the Church pray for the peace of Jerusalem? By admitting that it sees now in a mirror dimly, but will see some day face to face, that it knows now only in part. By keeping the faith of Advent: that thought the kingdom has come, yet it will come; that though the kingdom will come, yet it has come.

 

We pray for the peace of Jerusalem by our joining our vision to God’s: Then I saw a new heaven and a new earth, for the first heaven and the first earth had passed away, and there was no longer any sea. I saw the holy city, the new Jerusalem, a new Aleppo, a new Rochester - coming down out of heaven from God..and I heard a loud voice from the throne saying, “Look! God’s dwelling place is now among man, and he will dwell with them. They will not rape the earth with gas pipelines nor desecrate what is sacred, they will know no suicide bombs, and no borders of nationalism; they will turn their weapons into tools for harvesting food, They will be his people, and God himself will be with them and will be their God.”

 

Ruth+

sermon for Advent 1 2016     November 27

Cobbs Hill © 2005 T. Jutsum

Cobbs Hill © 2006 T. Jutsum

Community Music Notes and calendar October 2016.png

Stephen Kennedy


MUSIC NOTES FROM STEPHEN

 

We celebrate the youth of our parish by giving them opportunities to participate in sharing their musical gifts and skills in our liturgies.  At Christ Church, youth are learning to work together to develop skills of ensemble and solo performance.  By engaging in this kind of high-level process kids also learn great life lessons.  They also become a repository of treasured timeless expressions in art.  For centuries, the church has been a special place for people to create great works of art as an expression or affirmation.  It is wonderful to know that so many of the great artistic expressions from the past are being passed on to the youth of our parish in this way. The music-training process is not only aimed at keeping ancient art alive, but is a process that aids the individual in generating musical expression for the present and future. Music is an art form that must be actively performed to exist.  Unlike the visual arts, music relies on action to bring it about.  Performing is the most accurate word for this action.  

 

On Sunday, December 18 (Advent IV) at the 11:00 AM Eucharist, the youth of the parish will perform what we are calling a Celebration of Advent by portraying the Lessons and Gospel of the day through additional readings, drama, and music. Shirley Ricker has created a script with texts to be recited by our youth and the members of the Youth Ensemble will perform the music.  We are expecting that our beautifully redecorated Chancel will be filled with many young angels from a dream of St. Joseph.  Rehearsals will take place during Youth Ensemble rehearsal time, so there will be no additional rehearsal time for this event.  If you have a young person at home who may be interested in participating in this special liturgical event, please let Ruth, Shirley, or I know.  

 

Seasonal Liturgies and Events

 

FRIDAY: December 2th

• 7:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. Lessons and Carols with the Christ Church Choir & VanDelinder Fellows

 

SUNDAY, December 4th

• 8:30 p.m. Candlelight Concert: VanDelinder Fellows Candlelight Concert

• Compline at 9:00 p.m.

• Reception following Compline in Guild Room

 

SATURDAY, December 24th

• Christmas Eve: 10:15 p.m. Prelude by the Christ Church Choir, David Higgs and William Porter Organist.  

• 10:30 p.m. Solemn, Sung Eucharist with Carols and Motets of Christmas

 

SATURDAY, January 7, 2017

• 7:00-8:00 p.m. 12th Night Celebration:  Procession of the Three Kings, the Christ Church Choir. David Higgs and Stephen Kennedy, organists.

 

 

 

For more information about concerts and music events, please visit the Christ Church website: http://christchurchrochester.org/index.html.

 

 

Here are just a few ways in which Christ Church members and friends may participate in our initiative:

• Becoming an Usher/Candle-lighter for Compline on Sunday Nights

• Make contributions to our Friends of Music Fund. This fund supports music at Christ Church.  It also enables us to provide musical outreach to the Rochester community through music training programs, concerts, and enables us to enhance our liturgies with music.  

• Purchase our various CD recordings for friends and family members as gifts.

• Assist in publicizing music at Christ Church by helping sending emails to the local media

 

Please contact me if you are interested in participating in any aspect of our music program at Christ Church. Stephen Kennedy, Music Director stephenk@rochester.rr.com

 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

“Tuesday Pipes” at Christ Church: Every Tuesday, Eastman performers, faculty, and alumni will present a 25-minute lunchtime concert at Christ Church. Performances showcase the Craighead-Saunders Organ and Hook & Hastings Organ. Events begin at 12:10pm and are free and open to the public. For more information on the Tuesday Pipes series, please visit http://www.esm.rochester.edu/organ/events/

 

 

 

 

For more information about concerts and music events, please visit the Christ Church website: 

http://www.christchurchrochester.org/

You can also find the billboard of ongoing and special future events by going to the top of this section and clicking on the link "MUSIC GALLERY".

Here are just a few ways in which Christ Church members and friends may participate in our program:

• Becoming an Usher/Candle-lighter for Compline

• Make contributions to our Friends of Music Fund. This fund supports music at Christ Church.  It also enables us to provide musical outreach to the Rochester community through music-training programs, concerts, and enables us to enhance our liturgies with music.  

• Purchase our various CD recordings for friends and family members as gifts.

• Assist in publicizing music at Christ Church by helping sending emails to the local media

 

Please contact me if you are interested in participating in any aspect of our music program at Christ Church. Stephen Kennedy, Music Director stephenk@rochester.rr.com

 

You may also support our music education and enrichment opportunities for young musicians who are dedicating their lives to the field of sacred music by contributing to Christ Church’s "Friends of Music" fund.

Please continue to follow the musical life of our parish by reading the monthly Music Notes and Calendar that are emailed from my address  via MailChimp. 

-Click on the posters below for a full page view.

SCROLL DOWN

Stephen Kennedy


MUSIC NOTES FROM STEPHEN

 

We celebrate the youth of our parish by giving them opportunities to participate in sharing their musical gifts and skills in our liturgies.  At Christ Church, youth are learning to work together to develop skills of ensemble and solo performance.  By engaging in this kind of high-level process kids also learn great life lessons.  They also become a repository of treasured timeless expressions in art.  For centuries, the church has been a special place for people to create great works of art as an expression or affirmation.  It is wonderful to know that so many of the great artistic expressions from the past are being passed on to the youth of our parish in this way. The music-training process is not only aimed at keeping ancient art alive, but is a process that aids the individual in generating musical expression for the present and future. Music is an art form that must be actively performed to exist.  Unlike the visual arts, music relies on action to bring it about.  Performing is the most accurate word for this action.  

 

On Sunday, December 18 (Advent IV) at the 11:00 AM Eucharist, the youth of the parish will perform what we are calling a Celebration of Advent by portraying the Lessons and Gospel of the day through additional readings, drama, and music. Shirley Ricker has created a script with texts to be recited by our youth and the members of the Youth Ensemble will perform the music.  We are expecting that our beautifully redecorated Chancel will be filled with many young angels from a dream of St. Joseph.  Rehearsals will take place during Youth Ensemble rehearsal time, so there will be no additional rehearsal time for this event.  If you have a young person at home who may be interested in participating in this special liturgical event, please let Ruth, Shirley, or I know.  

 

Seasonal Liturgies and Events

 

FRIDAY: December 2th

• 7:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. Lessons and Carols with the Christ Church Choir & VanDelinder Fellows

 

SUNDAY, December 4th

• 8:30 p.m. Candlelight Concert: VanDelinder Fellows Candlelight Concert

• Compline at 9:00 p.m.

• Reception following Compline in Guild Room

 

SATURDAY, December 24th

• Christmas Eve: 10:15 p.m. Prelude by the Christ Church Choir, David Higgs and William Porter Organist.  

• 10:30 p.m. Solemn, Sung Eucharist with Carols and Motets of Christmas

 

SATURDAY, January 7, 2017

• 7:00-8:00 p.m. 12th Night Celebration:  Procession of the Three Kings, the Christ Church Choir. David Higgs and Stephen Kennedy, organists.

 

 

 

For more information about concerts and music events, please visit the Christ Church website: http://christchurchrochester.org/index.html.

 

 

Here are just a few ways in which Christ Church members and friends may participate in our initiative:

• Becoming an Usher/Candle-lighter for Compline on Sunday Nights

• Make contributions to our Friends of Music Fund. This fund supports music at Christ Church.  It also enables us to provide musical outreach to the Rochester community through music training programs, concerts, and enables us to enhance our liturgies with music.  

• Purchase our various CD recordings for friends and family members as gifts.

• Assist in publicizing music at Christ Church by helping sending emails to the local media

 

Please contact me if you are interested in participating in any aspect of our music program at Christ Church. Stephen Kennedy, Music Director stephenk@rochester.rr.com

 

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

“Tuesday Pipes” at Christ Church: Every Tuesday, Eastman performers, faculty, and alumni will present a 25-minute lunchtime concert at Christ Church. Performances showcase the Craighead-Saunders Organ and Hook & Hastings Organ. Events begin at 12:10pm and are free and open to the public. For more information on the Tuesday Pipes series, please visit http://www.esm.rochester.edu/organ/events/

 

 

 

 

For more information about concerts and music events, please visit the Christ Church website: 

http://www.christchurchrochester.org/

You can also find the billboard of ongoing and special future events by going to the top of this section and clicking on the link "MUSIC GALLERY".

Here are just a few ways in which Christ Church members and friends may participate in our program:

• Becoming an Usher/Candle-lighter for Compline

• Make contributions to our Friends of Music Fund. This fund supports music at Christ Church.  It also enables us to provide musical outreach to the Rochester community through music-training programs, concerts, and enables us to enhance our liturgies with music.  

• Purchase our various CD recordings for friends and family members as gifts.

• Assist in publicizing music at Christ Church by helping sending emails to the local media

 

Please contact me if you are interested in participating in any aspect of our music program at Christ Church. Stephen Kennedy, Music Director stephenk@rochester.rr.com

 

You may also support our music education and enrichment opportunities for young musicians who are dedicating their lives to the field of sacred music by contributing to Christ Church’s "Friends of Music" fund.

Please continue to follow the musical life of our parish by reading the monthly Music Notes and Calendar that are emailed from my address  via MailChimp. 

-Click on the posters below for a full page view.

Donate

End


The music sound files contained here are from the new CD recordings that have just been released. These recordings are available for purchase by clicking the link below. The music used in this publication is edited.  

http://www.christchurchrochester.org/recordings-cd-shop

 

Other links of interest are:

https://www.facebook.com/ccscholacantorum/?fref=ts

https://www.facebook.com/ChristChurchRochester/?fref=ts

http://www.christchurchrochester.org

 

Please click on the word "TOP" just below. It will take you back to the top of the opening page. From there please click on the words in the upper right side of the page to explore additional articles, news and events. There is also a photo gallery and many other wonderful things to see. The links are called:

"SONG"   "NEWS & EVENTS"  CHAPEL GALLERY"  MUSIC EVENT GALLERY"  "CONTACT"    "ARCHIVE"

The "CONTACT" page is also a place to leave comments or requests. The "ARCHIVE" page will show you past issues. 

SCROLL DOWN

End


The music sound files contained here are from the new CD recordings that have just been released. These recordings are available for purchase by clicking the link below. The music used in this publication is edited.  

http://www.christchurchrochester.org/recordings-cd-shop

 

Other links of interest are:

https://www.facebook.com/ccscholacantorum/?fref=ts

https://www.facebook.com/ChristChurchRochester/?fref=ts

http://www.christchurchrochester.org

 

Please click on the word "TOP" just below. It will take you back to the top of the opening page. From there please click on the words in the upper right side of the page to explore additional articles, news and events. There is also a photo gallery and many other wonderful things to see. The links are called:

"SONG"   "NEWS & EVENTS"  CHAPEL GALLERY"  MUSIC EVENT GALLERY"  "CONTACT"    "ARCHIVE"

The "CONTACT" page is also a place to leave comments or requests. The "ARCHIVE" page will show you past issues.