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Christ Church Rochester                      PENTECOST   2016                    The Song                                                          vol. 1      issue 5

 

Pentecost Banner (above as cover) acrylic on canvas- Descending Dove ©2005 Tim Jutsum

Lilies of the field © 1981 Mary Virginia Hill    

A representation of the invisible Wind of the Spirit upon the people of God; the lilies.

Almighty God,

unto whom all hearts are open,

all desires known, 

and from whom no secrets are hid;

Cleanse the thoughts of our hearts

by the inspiration

of  thy Holy Spirit,

that we may perfectly love thee,

and worthily magnify thy holy Name; 

through Christ our Lord.

Amen.

 

 

 

 
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editors letter


Editor note:

Pentecost

Every once in a while, during Sunday worship, I indulge my imagination and picture all of us with bright, intensely beautiful flames of light dancing on our foreheads. It is a physical, visual, tangible brand. I like doing this. I started it quite a while ago when I was new to the church we were going to at the time and I felt like I had nothing in common with the other people sitting around me. It seemed like we were all in our separate bubbles. I did what I usually do in these situations, I complained to God, about them. And, as usual, I was reminded that God has an entirely different take on the matter. I often feel that He’s laughing at me for being such a silly goose. I had gotten it completely wrong, again. All of the people around me were amazing. They had the Mark of the Lamb glowing on their brow. They were the intimate beloved of the Author of Life. We are the intimate beloved of the Author of Life.

 

Imagination is so dismissible. We say that something is just imaginary, meaning not true. And yet, I think it is a defining human quality. Everything we know to be true, was first imagined. It is a portal into the fantastically true. The Spirit of God makes use of it to inspire us. I have been using a hymn or sacred song on the opening page of previous issues of this publication, to illustrate whichever season of the Church we were in, as a theme. They each contained the word SONG because, well, you know. This issue is different. Jim Ford wrote a song and recorded it with his daughter Jennifer singing. The lyric is the Collect for Purity and it is perfect for Pentecost because of the letters in flamey red: By the inspiration of thy Holy Spirit. 

 

We are God’s people ablaze with His love, inspired with a fire that fills us to be new people with new hopes, making new things, singing new songs. The Song, this publication, is a perfect place to let your light shine. The Schola Cantorum, led by our wonderful music director Stephen Kennedy,  has a new CD. There are new babies. The EVENTS part of the SONG has art and poetry and prose. There are vacation pictures from Renate Eckart. There are also people sharing their excitement for new projects, including a letter from Meg and Eric Mackie about their recent wedding. It is us, alive in the Spirit. And, there’s fire.

Val Jutsum

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editors letter


Editor note:

Pentecost

Every once in a while, during Sunday worship, I indulge my imagination and picture all of us with bright, intensely beautiful flames of light dancing on our foreheads. It is a physical, visual, tangible brand. I like doing this. I started it quite a while ago when I was new to the church we were going to at the time and I felt like I had nothing in common with the other people sitting around me. It seemed like we were all in our separate bubbles. I did what I usually do in these situations, I complained to God, about them. And, as usual, I was reminded that God has an entirely different take on the matter. I often feel that He’s laughing at me for being such a silly goose. I had gotten it completely wrong, again. All of the people around me were amazing. They had the Mark of the Lamb glowing on their brow. They were the intimate beloved of the Author of Life. We are the intimate beloved of the Author of Life.

 

Imagination is so dismissible. We say that something is just imaginary, meaning not true. And yet, I think it is a defining human quality. Everything we know to be true, was first imagined. It is a portal into the fantastically true. The Spirit of God makes use of it to inspire us. I have been using a hymn or sacred song on the opening page of previous issues of this publication, to illustrate whichever season of the Church we were in, as a theme. They each contained the word SONG because, well, you know. This issue is different. Jim Ford wrote a song and recorded it with his daughter Jennifer singing. The lyric is the Collect for Purity and it is perfect for Pentecost because of the letters in flamey red: By the inspiration of thy Holy Spirit. 

 

We are God’s people ablaze with His love, inspired with a fire that fills us to be new people with new hopes, making new things, singing new songs. The Song, this publication, is a perfect place to let your light shine. The Schola Cantorum, led by our wonderful music director Stephen Kennedy,  has a new CD. There are new babies. The EVENTS part of the SONG has art and poetry and prose. There are vacation pictures from Renate Eckart. There are also people sharing their excitement for new projects, including a letter from Meg and Eric Mackie about their recent wedding. It is us, alive in the Spirit. And, there’s fire.

Val Jutsum

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Ruth's page


                                               Rector's Notes

Sometimes I go to the archive room to find quiet. I sit cross legged on the empty desk by the tall windows that overlook the front lawn and, from there, I watch the comings and goings of all walks of life. As I watch students, business people, “street people,” musicians, neighborhood residents and all kinds of people, I am watched by the Rector, Wardens, and Vestrymen of Christ Church, 1903. They are seated above me in a black and white photo on the wall. The rector, the Rev’d Andrew Graham, is somewhere in his forties, but it’s hard to say what he thinks of it all since, back in his day, no one smiles for the camera.

 

 It’s hard to read any of these men, but in my self-absorption,  I imagine they are watching me disapprovingly (for any number of reasons). So I judge myself for judging them: how possibly could I know where life has found the twelve of them in this particular flash of the camera? Faces never tell the whole story, no matter what we believe we can read in each other’s eyes. In fact, faces can be misleading, especially in old black and white photographs. Sometimes, in my mind, I speak to them. I tell them news of the church they gave us; I ask Father Graham if my rectorship looks anything like his; sometimes I ask them advice, and always I assure them that we are doing our best to carry on where they left off. I think this means something to them. 

 

What does Christ Church provide me that no other church provides? All kinds of things, but having just come down from the archive room, I am thinking most about this: Christ Church provides the archive room, and the journey to and from it. To get there – if you go by day – you cross the chancel where the sanctuary is lit up and, sometimes, shafts of orange light point down at the pews. Then you open the door into the tower sacristy, the name of which is as wondrous as the space itself. It is full of candelabras, and candles of every size. You can’t pass through the vast multitude these candles without thinking of light. Then you climb the tower stairs up nine steps before a sharp left turn, and up eight more steps to the archive room door.

 

Upon entering, you might decide to look through the box of birettas and ties the choir boys wore in the 1920’s, or you might study the faces ofSunday school children and their teachers in the 1950’s; you might look through papers, yellowed by age, of plans for the installation of the bells, or the architecture of the bell tower. When you look out across the lawn and see Eastman students hurrying to or from the Christ Church organs and the work world headed to or from their lunch, you’ll wonder at the passage of time. Maybe the lines from our beloved hymn will come to you: time like an ever flowing stream / bears all our years away / they fly forgotten as a dream / dies at the opening day. Then something in you will grow melancholy, maybe even a little lonely. But with the people in the photographs and the people outside the window surrounding you, you’ll ponder your togetherness with the saints in heaven and the saints on earth. And on your journey back from the archive room (especially if the sun is streaming down on the pews when you walk through the sanctuary), you’ll consider that quantum physics has it right: time doesn’t exist. That is why I like to go to the archive room to find quiet. This is what Christ Church provides me: views of where heaven and earth are joined.

Ruth+

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Ruth's page


                                               Rector's Notes

Sometimes I go to the archive room to find quiet. I sit cross legged on the empty desk by the tall windows that overlook the front lawn and, from there, I watch the comings and goings of all walks of life. As I watch students, business people, “street people,” musicians, neighborhood residents and all kinds of people, I am watched by the Rector, Wardens, and Vestrymen of Christ Church, 1903. They are seated above me in a black and white photo on the wall. The rector, the Rev’d Andrew Graham, is somewhere in his forties, but it’s hard to say what he thinks of it all since, back in his day, no one smiles for the camera.

 

 It’s hard to read any of these men, but in my self-absorption,  I imagine they are watching me disapprovingly (for any number of reasons). So I judge myself for judging them: how possibly could I know where life has found the twelve of them in this particular flash of the camera? Faces never tell the whole story, no matter what we believe we can read in each other’s eyes. In fact, faces can be misleading, especially in old black and white photographs. Sometimes, in my mind, I speak to them. I tell them news of the church they gave us; I ask Father Graham if my rectorship looks anything like his; sometimes I ask them advice, and always I assure them that we are doing our best to carry on where they left off. I think this means something to them. 

 

What does Christ Church provide me that no other church provides? All kinds of things, but having just come down from the archive room, I am thinking most about this: Christ Church provides the archive room, and the journey to and from it. To get there – if you go by day – you cross the chancel where the sanctuary is lit up and, sometimes, shafts of orange light point down at the pews. Then you open the door into the tower sacristy, the name of which is as wondrous as the space itself. It is full of candelabras, and candles of every size. You can’t pass through the vast multitude these candles without thinking of light. Then you climb the tower stairs up nine steps before a sharp left turn, and up eight more steps to the archive room door.

 

Upon entering, you might decide to look through the box of birettas and ties the choir boys wore in the 1920’s, or you might study the faces ofSunday school children and their teachers in the 1950’s; you might look through papers, yellowed by age, of plans for the installation of the bells, or the architecture of the bell tower. When you look out across the lawn and see Eastman students hurrying to or from the Christ Church organs and the work world headed to or from their lunch, you’ll wonder at the passage of time. Maybe the lines from our beloved hymn will come to you: time like an ever flowing stream / bears all our years away / they fly forgotten as a dream / dies at the opening day. Then something in you will grow melancholy, maybe even a little lonely. But with the people in the photographs and the people outside the window surrounding you, you’ll ponder your togetherness with the saints in heaven and the saints on earth. And on your journey back from the archive room (especially if the sun is streaming down on the pews when you walk through the sanctuary), you’ll consider that quantum physics has it right: time doesn’t exist. That is why I like to go to the archive room to find quiet. This is what Christ Church provides me: views of where heaven and earth are joined.

Ruth+

Herself (Lady Wisdom) © 2002 Tim Jutsum-   Where heaven and earth and joined

From the sermon preached by The Rev. Dr. Leona Irsch at the 8 AM service on July 3, 2016 at Christ Church

        The Old Testament reading for today has these words, found in your bulletin, Isaiah 66:10-13:

“Thus says the Lord:  “Rejoice with Jerusalem, and be glad for her, all you who love her; rejoice with her in joy, all you who mourn over her—that you may nurse and be satisfied from her consoling breast; that you may drink deeply with delight from her glorious bosom.  For thus says the LORD:  I will extend prosperity to her like a river, and the wealth of the nations like an overflowing stream; and you shall nurse and be carried on her arm, and dandled on her knees.  As a mother comforts her child, so I will comfort you.”

“So I will comfort you.”  This is a picture of God as feminine, and it is not the only one in the Old Testament.  Here is another:

The LORD says, “When Israel was a child, I loved him and called him out of Egypt as my son.  But the more I called to him, the more he turned away from me.  My people sacrificed to Baal; they burned incense to idols.  Yet I was the one who taught Israel to walk.  I took my people up in my arms, but they did not acknowledge that I took care of them.  I drew them to me with affection and love.  I picked them up and held them to my cheek;  I bent down to them and fed them” -Hosea 11:1-4 Good News Bible

(Please note that there are as many different translations of this passage as there are Bibles because the Hebrew is not clear.)

After the prophet warns the people that “Assyria will rule over them” (5), he quotes God as saying,  “How can I give you up, Israel?  How can I abandon you?  Could I ever destroy you as I did Admah, or treat you as I did Zeboiim?  My heart will not let me do it!  My love for you is too strong.  I will not punish you in my anger; I will not destroy Israel again.  For I am God and not man.  I, the Holy One, am with you.  I will not come to youin anger” (8-9).  Assyria was at the door; whether or not Israel would have repented, they were going to be destroyed.  But if the king had listened to the prophet and not thought he was invulnerable, but had been willing to compromise, perhaps Israel (the lost 10 tribes) would not have been wiped off the map.

Here we see God as mother, nursing and holding her child and teaching him how to walk.

Another passage is in the middle of a psalm we say every Lent, especially on Good Friday:

“Yet you are he who took me out of the womb, and kept me safe upon my mother’s breast.  I have been entrusted to you ever since I was born; you were my God when I was still in my mother’s womb” (Psalm 22:8,9 Book of Common Prayerp. 620).  The Hebrew verb under the translation “took” means “to cut, sever”.  The picture is of God as midwife.  When a woman is about to deliver, in Biblical times she sat on a birthing stool.  This was a chair with a u-shaped seat with nothing in the middle.  It had arms for the mother.  The midwife sat on the floor with her knees under the woman so that when the baby came out of the womb it fell into her lap.  She would cut the umbilical cord, clean up the baby, and put it at the mother’s breast to nurse.

There is also a feminine image of God in the New Testament.  It is in John 3:

“Jesus answered him, ‘Very truly I tell you,  no one can see the kingdom of God without being born from above (or anew)’.  Nicodemus said to him, ‘How can anyone be born after having grown old?  Can one enter a second time into the mother’s womb and be born?’  Jesus answered, ‘Very truly I tell you, no one can enter the kingdom of God without being born of water and Spirit’” (John 3:3-5 NRSV).

Wombs belong to mothers, not fathers.  In the church in Syria, which was a major Christian center until Islam wiped it out, the Spirit was always feminine because the word for spirit in Syriac, a semitic language akin to Hebrew, is feminine.  In Hebrew the word for spirit, or wind, is ruah, and there is a play on words in this section between wind and spirit. I t seems as if this passage was written down by someone who had a sense of the Hebrew or Syriac.

We are so used to hearing Father, Son and Holy Spirit, with the Spirit a bird, even though we are warned not to make any image of God:  “Since you saw no form when the LORD spoke to you at Horeb out of the fire, take care and watch yourselves closely, so that you do not act corruptly by making an idol for yourselves, in the form of any figure—the likeness of male or female” (Deuteronomy 4:15,16).  We get around that because Jesus was/is a human being, so we can make pictures of him.

These passages and one other show us the love and compassion of God:

“But Zion said, ‘The LORD has forsaken me, my lord has forgotten me.’  Can a woman forget her nursing child, or show no compassion for the child of her womb?  Even these may forget, yet I will not forget you.  See, I have inscribed you on the palms of my hands’” (Isaiah 49:15, 16 NRSV).  It is very difficult for a woman to forget her nursing child.  When the child cries, the milk comes down.  And if the child doesn’t nurse, her breasts become painfully engorged.

Here is some food for thought.

 

Leona Irsch served as a deacon at Christ church from 1983-84 and was ordained a priest here in 1984.  She served as rector of Zion, Avon from 84-90.  She has been many places since then, having left the diocese to go to graduate school in Toronto in 1990. She returned when she retired in September, 2014 and has been at Christ Church ever since.  Leona has a doctorate in Biblical Spirituality from Lutheran Seminary in Philadelphia. ~editor's note
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Stephen Kennedy


Music Director's Notes

A Sunday in Paris

Announcing the release of the latest CD recording from Christ Church. This 2 CD set is availible for $20. The Christ Church Schola Cantorum joins forces with Joris Verdin who plays Eastman's vintage Muestel Harmonium. Experience the sounds that a Parisian could have heard on a typical Sunday in the 19th century. This program includes many works recorded for the first time with original instrumentation -- works by Franck, Saint-Saëns, Gounod, Berlioz, Lemmens, Dubois, and Lefebure-Wely. These CDs make wonderful gifts to lovers of music.

 

Stephen Kennedy, Music Director

 

 

You may also support our music education and enrichment opportunities for young musicians who are dedicating their lives to the field of sacred music by contributing to Christ Church’s "Friends of Music" fund.

Please continue to follow the musical life of our parish by reading the monthly Music Notes and Calendar that are emailed from my address  via MailChimp. 

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Stephen Kennedy


Music Director's Notes

A Sunday in Paris

Announcing the release of the latest CD recording from Christ Church. This 2 CD set is availible for $20. The Christ Church Schola Cantorum joins forces with Joris Verdin who plays Eastman's vintage Muestel Harmonium. Experience the sounds that a Parisian could have heard on a typical Sunday in the 19th century. This program includes many works recorded for the first time with original instrumentation -- works by Franck, Saint-Saëns, Gounod, Berlioz, Lemmens, Dubois, and Lefebure-Wely. These CDs make wonderful gifts to lovers of music.

 

Stephen Kennedy, Music Director

 

 

You may also support our music education and enrichment opportunities for young musicians who are dedicating their lives to the field of sacred music by contributing to Christ Church’s "Friends of Music" fund.

Please continue to follow the musical life of our parish by reading the monthly Music Notes and Calendar that are emailed from my address  via MailChimp. 

End


The music sound files contained here are from the new CD recordings that have just been released. These recordings are available for purchase by clicking the link below. The music used in this publication is edited.  

http://www.christchurchrochester.org/recordings-cd-shop

 

Other links of interest are:

https://www.facebook.com/ccscholacantorum/?fref=ts

https://www.facebook.com/ChristChurchRochester/?fref=ts

http://www.christchurchrochester.org

 

Please click on the word "TOP" just below. It will take you back to the top of the opening page. From there please click on the words in the upper right side of the page to explore additional articles, news and events. There is also a photo gallery and many other wonderful things to see. The links are called:

"SONG"   "NEWS & EVENTS"  CHAPEL GALLERY"  MUSIC EVENT GALLERY"  "CONTACT"    "ARCHIVE"

The "CONTACT" page is also a place to leave comments or requests. The "ARCHIVE" page will show you past issues. 

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End


The music sound files contained here are from the new CD recordings that have just been released. These recordings are available for purchase by clicking the link below. The music used in this publication is edited.  

http://www.christchurchrochester.org/recordings-cd-shop

 

Other links of interest are:

https://www.facebook.com/ccscholacantorum/?fref=ts

https://www.facebook.com/ChristChurchRochester/?fref=ts

http://www.christchurchrochester.org

 

Please click on the word "TOP" just below. It will take you back to the top of the opening page. From there please click on the words in the upper right side of the page to explore additional articles, news and events. There is also a photo gallery and many other wonderful things to see. The links are called:

"SONG"   "NEWS & EVENTS"  CHAPEL GALLERY"  MUSIC EVENT GALLERY"  "CONTACT"    "ARCHIVE"

The "CONTACT" page is also a place to leave comments or requests. The "ARCHIVE" page will show you past issues.