Easter 2018

 Empty Tomb- © 2005 Tim Jutsum

Empty Tomb- © 2005 Tim Jutsum

CHRIST CHURCH                  EASTER  2018

Rochester, NY       The SONG        vol. 3 issue  4

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EVENTS

EVENTS and ANNOUNCEMENTS in This Issue

Capital Campaign Kickoff

Bishop Prince Singh

Lecture audio and video

    Third Sunday Lecture Series and Compline

Latest Sunday Bulletin and Audio of the 11:00 am Eucharist

(when you click on an image below it will become full size and you can scroll through the pages)

Vestry Minutes

GRANTS UPDATE

The Care Team

ANNUAL MEETING- January 28th, 2018

text of agenda

Candlelight Concert Schedule 2017-2018


Capital Campaign Kickoff

Third Sunday Lectures and Compline

Bishop Prince Singh


Vestry Minutes,  March 2018

 

Vestry Minutes March 20, 2018

 

  1. Visit from Jessica Tower, Capital Campaign Consultant

Jessica Tower was welcomed to the meeting. She has been a professional fundraiser for fifteen years. Coincidentally, she has previous connections to the Father’s House, and to the Eastman School. She offered an overview of how she hopes to approach her work at Christ Church. She will begin with a Listening Tour, as she becomes acquainted with the community. She will be officially introduced at both services on April 15. She will also be available at coffee hour that day. She will meet with the church staff. She wants them to know that she is available to them. She will supply monthly reports to the Vestry. To sum up, if the Capital Campaign team could be said to be a car moving through traffic, concentrating on looking at the car right ahead, Jessica will be helping by providing the bigger picture of reaching the final destination. The Capital Campaign at Christ Church is an endeavor which she looks forward to embracing with passion and enthusiasm. 

 

2.   Visit from Padraic Collins-Bohrer

Paddy asked the Vestry for a letter of support from the Vestry, to be part of the final step toward ordination to the priesthood. This letter, to be written by Ruth, in ink, and signed by the Vestry, will be sent to Carolyn McConnell at Diocesan HQ, in time for Paddy’s meeting with the Commission on Ministry on Saturday, April 28.

Paddy also gave us an update on his new assignments. Since February 21, he has been at the Church of the Ascension. He has entered into the preaching rotation. His fellow deacon there is Christ Church alumnus Lucy Alonzo. He is also working full time as a chaplain at Strong Hospital. This includes a learning component. He works in the Burn, ICU, Medical Trauma, and Psychiatric Units. He considers his participation in this ministry to be an honor. 

Paddy is beginning to have discussions with the Bishop about work opportunities after ordination. The Vestry thanked Paddy for his faithful response to a calling from God which, though rewarding, involves difficult and trying challenges.

 

3.   Rector’s Time

Ruth and the Executive Committee have decided it best for her to take a three month leave of absence, beginning right after Easter Sunday. She is fighting a very serious disease, and she must have time to rest, without stress, to give her the best chance to get better. The Vestry commended her determination to work as long as she has, in spite of being very ill. Fr. Steven Metcalfe and Fr. Bruce Griffith will be among the supply priests subbing for her in her absence.

 

4. Warden’s Report: 

Deb said 3 people have agreed to act as liaisons to help while Ruth is gone: Deb will be liaison to ROCO; Kyle will be liaison to the Eastman; and, Norm Geil will be liaison to the Father’s House.

 

5.  Capital Campaign Committee:

Joe announced that there is now a Capital Campaign tab on the CC website. It features a thermometer, synopsis of projects, and a donate button. Thanks to Colin Soleim for designing the site.

 

6. Discussion of Safety and Security Meeting Report:

Kyle reported that many big, difficult issues were brought to the forefront at this meeting held on Feb. 28, which was a forum for concerns about safety in the church; especially, in the light of the many tragic mass killings which have happened across the country. There have been incidents at Christ Church which, although “handled”, have revealed the need for professional guidance. We want everyone to be safe, and to take all necessary measures to ensure that. 

A committee of volunteers from the Safety and Security Meeting has formed and will send back recommendations concerning all of these issues. Meg will act as liaison to the Committee, whose members will be Joe and Vicki McCutchon, Spencer and Hope McGuckin, Pru Kirkpatrick, Lois Jones, and Jonathan Falk. 

 

7. Proposal for Garden from ROCO:

The Vestry discussed ROCO’s art project for June-October. It is a concrete tree with LED leaves that change color. One possible location was the center circle, but the Vestry decided the lawn adjacent to ROCO where the other installations have been was a better location for the tree as well. 

 

8. Deb reported that the Sunday evening pre-compline talk by Cynthia Houck on March 18 was well attended. Cynthia encouraged her listeners to join her in supporting a building which in this day and age cannot be rebuilt.

 

 

Respectfully submitted by David C. Jutsum, clerk of the Vestry.


Grants Update

WE GOT GRANTS!

GRANT UPDATE- December 19, 2017

 

The Christ Church grant team is thrilled to announce that the church was granted a New York State historical preservation grant for just over $106,000. The grant team applied for these funds to fix the six clerestory windows, which have damaged sills, frames, and panes, and therefore have let water into the building, which is partially responsible for the piece of the ceiling that fell from the North Aisle a couple of years ago. (The other element responsible was the roof on that aisle, which has already been repaired.) This work will be scheduled for Summer 2020. The grant team was inspired by the successful application by Ron Vukman to get a similar grant from NYS in 2009. It is rare to get a second grant in such a short time, and the grant team is grateful to everyone who helped by supplying us with information, especially Stephen Kennedy and Norm Geil. We are also so grateful for our partners Meal & More and The Father’s House, whose leadership wrote supporting letters to us, and to those in the community who also wrote letters supporting our application. 

 

Deb VanderBilt is also especially grateful to Val Jutsum, who happened to be at home within reach of her phone at the moment before Deb hit the “Submit” button on the grant website. Val and Deb claimed the verse “where 2 or 3 are gathered” and prayed for a successful outcome.  : )   Thanks to the whole grant team:  Deb VanderBilt, Tom Foster, Meg Mackey, Peg Britt, and Hugh Kierig.

 

This brings our grant total for repair work to $148,000.  These grant funds will go a long way toward helping the church pay for repair of the Lawn St. wall and the Nave repair and repainting projects.

Below is the original posting about our Grant process and hopes. I left it in to underline how wonderfully these prayers were answered.-ed.

 

old news

[The grant-writing team (Deb VanderBilt, Tom Foster, Meg Mackey, Peg Britt, and Hugh Kierig) has finished this year’s round of applications. In general, grants are available in the historic preservation category; in other words, we have to specify a building project and the grant will go toward repairs. Here’s an update on where we are with our grants.

 

In January, we applied for a grant from Sacred Sites (a part of the New York Conservancy Trust) for $50,000 for our buckling wall on Lawn Street. We received $25,000, which the grant administrator told us is typically the upper limit of what they award. We must match that grant 50-50 (no problem, since the wall repairs will cost at least $130K).

 

In May, we applied for two grants for the wall as well: to the Rochester Community Foundation Grant for $25,000 and to the Partners for Sacred Places for an unspecified amount (the first step is a “letter of intent”). We should hear from RCF in October, and we already heard we did not make the first cut from Partners for Sacred Places.

 

In July, we applied to New York State for a Historic Preservation Grant. Because our church is in a zip code that is characterized by high poverty, if we get this grant it will be a 75/25 match (we pay 25%). We applied for the grant for clerestory window repair, since the criterion for the grant is urgency. Water infiltration caused part of the ceiling under these leaky windows to fall down, so we believe we have a good case that window repairs are urgent. The application was for about $120,000, and we will hear in January about whether or not we receive it. 

 

We also applied in May for a Congregational Development Grant from the Diocese. This grant can be used for our deficit, so it is very different from the historic preservation grants. If we get it, we are eligible to be on a 5-year cycle of grant renewal, but it will be less each year as we work toward sustainability. To apply for the grant, the team worked on a plan of action to “develop” our congregation: communicating better about what we do to the community and other ways of growing our congregation. We applied for $35,000 and we will hear in September or October from the diocese if we get the grant.  They can say no, give the full amount we asked for, or give a lesser amount based on the total they have to allocate within the diocese.

 

It’s because of this final grant that Ruth, Deb, and Joe were required to attend the College for Congregational Development, to learn tools that will help us grow Christ Church both “inside,” in what we do to develop spiritual lives and fellowship in our church, and outside, in what we do to live out our mission and attract others to work with us on that mission.]

 

It’s also in connection with the Diocesan grant that you took the survey about what attracted you to Christ Church and why you stay. Here are the results of that survey (except the comments, which even though anonymous we are treating as confidential:

 

Member Survey: 63 responses

 

Question 1: What caused you to visit Christ Church for a church service (other than Compline) the first time? (Click all that apply)

I was looking for a faith community 50.00% 26

Heard about it from someone I know 46.15% 24

Found it through the website 13.46% 7

Was in the neighborhood and was curious 13.46% 7

Attended Compline, then came to a service 7.69% 4

Read about it in the newspaper 1.92% 1

Found it via Facebook 1.92% 1 

Attended Jazz Festival then came to a service 0.00% 0

Question 2: What was it about Christ Church that caused you to attend regularly or become a member? (Click all that apply.)

The music 70.4% 43 

The preaching 63.9% 39 

The Christ Church community 59.0% 36 

The way the service is conducted (the liturgy) 57.3% 35

The physical space (Sanctuary) 47.5% 29

The outreach initiatives of Christ Church 34.4% 21

Question 3: If you had to pick a PRIMARY reason why you attend Christ Church regularly or are a member, what would you pick?

The music 26.6% 16 

The Christ Church community 26.6% 16 

The liturgy 20% 12 

The preaching 18.3% 11 

*Question 3 responses by those at CC 8 or fewer years: 

The preaching 31% 9 

The Christ Church community 24.1% 7 

The music 20.6% 6 

The liturgy 17.2% 5

Lent 2018

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CHRIST CHURCH       LENT  2018

Rochester, NY                      The SONG                            vol. 3 issue  3

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The Care Team

is here to help

 

The Christ Church Care Team is a volunteer ministry to help parishioners on a temporary basis as they recover from surgery, suffer the death of a loved one, are home bound or in the hospital, or need support due to another kind of loss or difficult transition. The Care Team assists parishioners in need with the following: shopping, meals, pet care, house help, phone calls to check in, and home and hospital visits. Please notify the Rector if you or someone you know could use Care Team support. [Care Team Leaders: Shirley Ricker, Norma Kurmis, Lydia Worboys, Peg Britt, Elizabeth Dugdale, Kyle Liddell and Jim Blake]


Christ Church     Annual Parish Meeting    January 28, 2018

 

Prayer and Rector’s Opening Remarks The Rev’d Ruth Ferguson    

 

Updates/Greetings from Community Partners Bleu Cease, ROCO

Lois Jones, A Meal & More

Chef Alan Callerame & William Drayton

Emily Brennan

Nominations for Warden and Vestry Kyle Liddell

  • Warden for 2-year term
  • Three vestry persons for 3-year terms
  • 1 Vestry person for 1-year fill-in term
  • Open spot for 2-year fill-in term

Open Ballot

Voting members are 18 years or older, have been baptized for at least 12 months, are regular attendants at worship, and contribute to the support of the parish.

Report on Parish ministries

Music Program Lydia Kirkpatrick

Spiritual Formation Kyle Liddell

Outreach Lucie Parfitt

Finance Committee Meg Mackey and Norm Geil

Capital Campaign Lucie Parfitt

Warden’s Remarks Deb VanderBilt

Close Ballot The Rev’d Ruth Ferguson

Closing Prayer The Rev’d Ruth Ferguson

 

REPORT on the Music Program

Stephen Kennedy, Music Director

Christ Church Music Program

Special thanks and appreciation is due to each of you for your participation in music at Christ Church. Whether singing a chant or hymn, listening to a prelude or postlude, or honing a motet in a rehearsal, we are all celebrating something important together as a family through music and we do it with love. We are grateful for the support and work of our Rector Ruth Ferguson, Wardens Deborah Vanderbilt and Kyle Liddell, the Vestry, Pat Knapp, and Moses Roland. We also want to thank our Associate organists David Higgs and William Porter for contributing so generously of their time and talent. They also help with mentoring and teaching our parish musicians and VanDelinder Fellows. Our VanDelinder Fellows Joshua Ehlebracht, Henry Webb, and Alden Wright also deserve tremendous thanks for all their great work in our parish.  Our Eastman-Christ Church Choral Scholar, Adam Sadberry; Choral Scholar, Evan Ritter; and Music Scholar, Thatcher Lyman (Assistant Director of the Schola Cantorum) also contribute greatly to music at Christ Church. It is so exciting to see such growth in liturgical music skills from these dedicated young musicians. We are also extremely grateful to Christopher Huebner, Schola librarian and coordinator, as well as our dedicated teem of Compline Ushers. Continued thanks and appreciation goes to the members of our parish ensembles as listed below:

 

Goals from 2017 – ongoing in 2018

  1. Attract more people to Christ Church through our music program Goal on target
  2. Raise the level of musicianship in CC ensembles Goal on target
  3. Raise community awareness of our rich and diverse music program Goal on target
  4. Foster the education and training of musicians in liturgical music skills Goal on target
  5. Engage people from the larger community (non parishioners) to help fund 

our parish music program Goal on target

  1. Install professional recording equipment in the church to record CC Choir, 

Youth Ensemble, Consort, CC liturgies, and concerts     Working on installation date

7.   Fundraising to support our parish music program Goal on target

8.   Strengthen existing community collaborations and partnerships in music Goal on target

 

Opportunities for individuals to assist and contribute in our parish music program  

  1. Compline ushers and Candle-lighters   Team is in place, but more are welcome
  2. Greeters at Tuesday Pipes to represent the parish   Alan Jones is our regular; others are welcome 
  3. Volunteers to help send publicity to media via e-mail   Help in this would be great
  4. People to help set up for Compline following the 11:00   CC Choir members could use assistance

Eucharist  

  1. People to assist in searching for grants and grant writing     Volunteers needed

REPORTS on Christ Church Programs and Volunteer Opportunities

Along with pledging, the donation of one’s time to parish organizations and working groups has a tremendous impact on the vitality of the church. Below you’ll see a list of all the groups and tasks working at Christ Church. Groups with a crucial need have those needs in bold print, but all the groups welcome new volunteers. Please read the list and see what might match your interests and skills. 

A MEAL AND MORE – Lois Jones

 

In order to sustain, A Meal and More, now beginning its 39th year, it takes the cooperation and effort of: Christ Church Rochester; A Meal and More, Inc. Board Members; Hundreds of Volunteers, from both Episcopal and non-Episcopal churches; an experienced and competent Chef; a pleasant and watchful Greeter and a germ conscious and helpful Dishwasher.

It is truly startling to find out that 1 out of every 6 people in the United States is considered food challenged. 8130 meals were served during 2017 by A Meal and More. The Elderly are a very consistent presence. Between 140 and 270 meals were served to them every month this year, as compared to between 150 and 200 meals per month last year. The number of meals to Children nearly doubled with 40 meals per month being served to Children compared to approximately 25 meals per month last year. Adults – make up the largest group we feed with approximately 500 meals served to this group each month which is down by about 100 meals per month from last year but those meals are now being served to the Elderly and Children. 

The 3 men who faithfully feed our Urban poor are: Allen Callerame, Chef; William Drayton, Greeter and Nick Donofrio, Dishwasher.

We want to THANK all the members of Christ Church for your faithful and continued support of A Meal and More, Inc.’s Ministry. --Lois Jones, Vice President and Kristy Liddell, Volunteer Coordinator 

ALTAR GUILD – Bill Soleim

 

The Altar Guild is a group of men and women who works mostly behind the scenes to prepare for services on Sunday. Our ministry involves caring for the vestments, vessels, and altar linens of Christ Church. We usually work in pairs to set up for Sunday’s services at 9:30 on Saturday morning (for about 1 hour). After the 11:00 service, we take about 20 minutes to wash communion vessels and put away vestments. We each serve one a week per month, but many of us also work together on Christmas and Easter to decorate the sanctuary. If you think you would enjoy serving God and our congregation in this quiet ministry, please contact Bill Soleim. 

Crucial need: A partner for an altar guild member currently serving alone on SECOND and FOURTH Sundays of the month.

ANGEL TREES – Eleanor Peet

 

This outreach program is the collection of Christmas gifts for the women clients, and their families, of the Willow Domestic Violence Center (formerly known as Alternatives for Battered Women). The Center provides us with a wish list. Paper Angels with suggestions written on them decorate two trees that are placed in the sanctuary and the Guild Room each December. Parishioners take an angel or two and bring their gifts unwrapped back to church to be brought to the Center mid-December. Willow Center says: “over 70% of domestic violence crimes are witnessed by children. A simple gesture of providing new toys during their stay can give a child in crisis a sense of normalcy and hope.”

 

BIRTHDAY CARDS – Carolyn Mauro

A delightful task that we on the birthday card team have is to send greetings to every member of our parish family whose birthday we have on record at the parish office. This is a small but, we’ve heard, enjoyed yearly acknowledgment of your importance to our parish family—you’re all a vital part of us. We’re all grateful for your presence and giving of your talents to Christ Church’s mission, so the cards are a small but sincere reminder of that to you. Crucial Need: Several members have not shared their “special day” with us, and if you have chosen not to participate, we understand. However, if you have been with Christ Church for a while and have not been acknowledged, or if you are new to us, and would like to receive a yearly card, please notify the parish office at your earliest convenience. Thank you.

A GIFT AND A PROMISE CAPITAL CAMPAIGN COMMITTEE REPORT – Joe Schaller

The members of the committee are: The Rev. Ruth Ferguson; Gail Lynch; Lucy Parfitt; Joseph Schaller, chairperson; Bill Soleim; John Urban; and Deb Vanderbilt. The committee is grateful for the opportunity to serve Christ Church.

The Christ Church building needs repair. If we are to continue to worship and fulfill our great commission, as Christians, in this building, the repairs must be done as soon as possible. Because our operating funds are insufficient to pay for the capital improvements, the Christ Church Vestry decided to initiate a capital campaign. A campaign committee was formed, and the campaign was named A Gift and a Promise. Your Gift is for our near-term needs and it is also a Promise – because it secures our future. The campaign goal is $1 million. Demonstrating their commitment to the campaign each member of the vestry has pledged a gift. 

In the spring of 2017 a capital campaign consultant was briefly retained. Dissatisfied with the consultant, the relationship was terminated, and the capital campaign committee assumed the responsibilities for the day-to-day operational management of the campaign. The committee has been meeting on a weekly basis since August 2017. Campaign polices, collateral materials and an administrative infrastructure were created. Fundraising plans were determined and initiated for parishioners, friends of Christ Church and external organizations. 

To date the campaign has raised through gifts, pledges and grants… Apologies for the tease but to find out the amount raised and other important details of the campaign, and your vital role we cordially invite you to A Gift and a Promise kick-off celebration on Sunday, February 11 following the 11 AM service. 

CARE TEAM – Norma Kurmis and Elizabeth Dugdale

The Meals Care Team has 8 active members. We have provided several meals to 4 families since the summer. The team will bring meals on a temporary basis to parishioners who have suffered bereavement, have a new baby or are home from the hospital, for example. If anyone knows of a family who could use a little extra help with a meal or two, please contact Ruth with your request. Sometimes the requests can come in quickly, so anyone who is willing to donate their time and meal-prep skills to the team would be welcomed! If you are interested in joining us, please let me know at lotusmom2000@hotmail.com.

Home Visits currently has 10 members who arrange amongst themselves to go a visit a fellow member of our church when notified who is in need of a little bit of society but cannot get to church! We have (luckily) only been called upon to arrange visits for a total of 3 fellow church members over the past year. I believe we have done a good job in dividing up the visits and find these interactions & chances to socialize highly rewarding, but as the head of this group, I confess: I have done a poor job in double checking in with my teammates and apologize...Sorry ya'll! We are always welcoming more people to add their name to the list to go visit a church family members when they are in need of some company so please email Elizabeth Dugdale at emother@gmail.com if you would like to join! (And/or if you have any suggestions).  If you need a meal or a visit from the Care Team, call or email the Rector and she will let the Care Team know.  

COMMUNICATION COMMITTEE – Kyle Liddell

The communications committee is composed of the maintainers of the CC website, The Song, the Facebook page, our paper brochures and advertisements, and other publicity efforts.  Follow our church activities in The Song and on Facebook and share them with others.

FORUM – Mary Vukman

The Forum is a study and discussion group that meets on Sunday mornings.   Most recently, we have been reading the Letter of James slowly and inquisitively.  We ask a lot of questions and toss around a lot of maybe's, hoping to better understand our our Christian heritage and calling.  Watch the bulletin for a new topic coming soon.   Then join us any Sunday 9:45 -10:45 am in the Guild Room. 

FOYERS – Val Jutsum

Foyers is our name for small informal groups of Christ Church parishioners who meet for a meal. They are a wonderful way, whether you are relatively new to the church or a long-time member, to meet and get to know other Christ Church members.

Foyers groups are composed of 6-8 people who meet once a month in each others’ homes for a simple dinner. Each person hosts one dinner during the “season,” and it is a simple dinner (not potluck) lasting from about 6 to 9 p.m.  There is no agenda, just fun and fellowship! Because of Rochester weather, the “Foyers season” at Christ Church is April to October.  

Do you have small children? In the past, we have offered the choice to specify if you would like to be in a group with others with small children. Please note your choice about that when signing up below.

Are you thinking “I don’t have space for 8-10 people to sit around a dining table”? Don't let that stop you! Dinners can be informal--we can balance plates on our laps! We can picnic! All who want to be part of Foyers are welcome.

This past Foyer Season didn’t occur. The number of interested participants wasn’t enough to make a group(s). 

Crucial need: Interested people to eat a meal and have fun.

CHANCEL TEAM: Acolyte, Crucifer, Subdeacon, Thurifer, Verger – Jim Bement

 

At all celebrations of the Liturgy, it is fitting that the principal celebrant, whether bishop or priest, be assisted by other priests, and by deacons and lay persons.” (BCP, 322 & 354).  When serving at the altar, members of the chancel team are fulfilling those directions of the Book of Common Prayer. We are aware that the purpose of assisting at the altar is “that God may be glorified.” Since last year’s report, we have added 5 members to the Team including 1 youth.  To reinitiate the position of Verger in our services we will need two or three additional members.  Training as to what to do as well as why we do it will be provided at your convenience.  Please contact me or the Rector if you wish to explore this service to our parish and to God. --Jim Bement, 585.734.5756, jhbement@rochester.rr.com

JAZZ FESTIVAL – Carlos Mercado

 

Each June, our parish welcomes over 6,000 music lovers to our building to enjoy what has become one of the four top jazz festivals in the world and the largest gathering of British Isles musicians outside of England.  This was the tenth year that we have hosted the “Made In the UK” Series, and it is possible only because of a group of dedicated parish and community volunteers.  Having been designed as a Community Outreach event, it covers our out-of-pocket costs and affords an opportunity to showcase our historic building.  As a result of the festival and press coverage, the name “Christ Church Rochester, NY” is well known in UK jazz circles, and we enjoy an excellent reputation for our hospitality and the quality of our facilities.  We look forward to our 11th year in just a few months. Team: Carlos Mercado. Joe and Vicki McCutcheon

COFFEE HOUR, SCHOOL 9, MEALS for NEW PARENTS, WEDDINGS & SPECIAL EVENTS [phew!]         – Vicki McCutchon

Coffee hour is a well- oiled machine.  We have a great crew that continue to provide tasty and quenching treats and bring us all together to catch up with one another.

This is a fun year for weddings and Meals for New Parents, because we have sisters having babies within weeks of one another and we have two parishioner weddings this summer.  In addition to our two parishioner weddings there are 4 other weddings on the books.  The goal is eight weddings a year and I do believe we will make our goal.  The church hosted 8 weddings in 2017.

I am happy to say that School #9 has quite a few churches helping them out.  My contact still wants us to stay on board for school supplies which I do in conjunction with Christ Church Pittsford.  I always enjoy working with the ladies from CCP as we put the school bags and uniform items together for the excited students.  School #9 knows though they can always contact us if there is a need.

We continue to host our annual events of the Antiphon celebration in December and 12th Night or in this year’s case our Epiphany Celebration and the Annual Meeting Luncheon held in January.  A wedding reception and dinner was held after a small wedding service this past November and was very well received.  Three funeral receptions were held also this past year.  We also had a going away luncheon for Marianne this past summer.

GARDEN – Deb VanderBilt

The garden group—Kitty Jospe, Lois & Alan Jones, Deb VanderBilt, Tom Foster, Joe McCutchon and other parish members and Sagamore residents—had a good year in the garden due to plentiful rain. Many neighbors and visitors are in our garden on a daily basis, and we get appreciative comments about its beauty all the time. We love sharing the garden with ROCO art as well.  We dealt with vandalism to the center urn by strengthening its core, and believe it is more immune from efforts to push it over now. We can always use more hands during the early summer weeding season and the fall leaf-raking season. Contributions that go primarily toward mulching costs (about $2,000/year) are always welcome. 

Crucial Need: We announce our garden work days in advance in the bulletin and responses to those work days are what would be most helpful for this group. 

LECTORS AND INTERCESSORS – Kevin Finnigan

The Lectors and Intercessors are responsible for reading the lessons and Prayers of the People at services throughout the year.  Parishioners who are interested and not yet members of “the team” are encouraged to join us.  Lectors read about 4-5 times a year, and Intercessors about once a month. 

PROPERTY COMMITTEE – Kyle Liddell

The Property Committee monitors the status of the building and property, and works with external organizations for larger repair efforts. Over the past year, we have been working towards our Lawn Street Wall repair (which will happen this summer!), coordinating with the Campaign Committee in planning for the remaining work in the nave, investigating lighting improvements, and managing roof and other building maintenance.

QUILTERS – Ann Piato

We have presented 36 handmade quilts to newly baptized members as they join Christ Church, 31 for infants and 5 for adults (3 for staff). We also made the quilt hanging in the hallway in honor of the 150th anniversary of the founding of the Church. Lucy Alonzo and Marianne Sickles received quilts in honor of their service to Christ Church, and we made a quilt for Ruth Ferguson to honor her first year as our rector (with pieces of fabric donated by the congregation). The quilters of Christ Church are Eleanor Peet, Ann Piato and Pat Kingsley.

RAIHN – Beatrice Deshommes

Rochester Area Interfaith Hospitality Network (RAIHN) helps homeless families become independent by providing shelter, food and case management.  Community churches provide housing and/or volunteers to support this work. We are in need of more volunteers to help sustain this ministry. 

Go to  www.raihn.org for more information. Contact Beatrice Deshommes 585-880-7029 for information on becoming a Christ Church RAIHN volunteer

SANCTUARY AT CHRIST CHURCH – Lucie Parfitt and Rev. Ruth Ferguson

“Sanctuary at Christ Church” is an outreach support team, with “sanctuary” being a symbolic term for how we serve Christ with our building and with our hearts. In addition to supporting  A Meal and More, RAIHN, and the Angel Tree, we invited parishioners to participate in “Walk for Water” for Sudan; an interfaith gathering at Temple B’rith Kodesh to support Project Homeless Connect; a harvest dinner to honor farm workers, and hosted  the Drawdown Series (climate advocacy)in the Guild Room. [Outreach Team: the Rev’d Ruth Ferguson, Lucie Parfitt, and Sue Hughes Smith]

 

 

SONG – Val Jutsum

The SONG is the newsletter for Christ Church Rochester. It is a digital publication that changes themes with the seasons of the liturgical year. The actual content changes frequently, as often as daily, sometimes. It includes eight distinct sections. They are the cover section (Song) which has an editor’s note, Ruth’s essay, and Stephen Kennedy’s music notes. The next section is a blog of Ruth’s sermons in audio form. The section called News and Events has activities and things parishioners wish to share with the other members of the parish and due to the world wide audience of the internet, the world. The music event gallery shows the ongoing music activities and contributors and the chapel gallery is a collection of photographs of the Mary Chapel intended for the private reflection of our visitors as an aid to prayer and meditation. There is a contact page where anyone can leave a message, suggestion, or comment. The archive section has all of the back issues, but because it is set up like a blog post, the most recent issue is on top and the previous issues are below in chronological order going back to the very first issue. There is also a donate section. This is set up to take credit card donations. Anyone, parishioner or casual visitor can make a donation, by credit card from this page.

We also send out a small number of paper printed copies for those parishioners who have requested it, typically people who do not have access to a computer, tablet, smartphone, or internet.

The SONG also contains in every section, lots of music and art, much of it original. It can’t be seen anywhere but here. The music is taken from our service recordings as well as professionally made recordings of the Schola Cantorum. It is world class.

Below is a breakdown of the number of visits the SONG had last year and last month.

My hope for the SONG is that people would enjoy reading it, share it with their friends, both in the parish and outside it, and invest themselves creatively by submitting items for publication. We have a very talented and dedicated group of people. I want them to use their voices. I want them to be seen and heard.

SPIRITUAL FORMATION – Kyle Liddell and Rev. Ruth Ferguson

This year we have a “formation team” planning and creating programs for study, prayer, and faith sharing throughout the 2017-2018 academic year. In October/November we held book study on NT Wright’s “Surprised by Hope: Rethinking Heaven, the Resurrection, and the Mission of the Church.” In November/December, we welcomed the Rev’d Bill Peterson to three lunch studies to present on the history and theology of Advent and its liturgies from his book, “What are We Waiting For? Re-imagining Advent for Time to Come.”  In January / February, the Rector will lead an Inquirer’s Class for those new to the Episcopal Church and/or seeking  baptism, confirmation or reception into the church.  In February/ March, the Formation Team will lead a contemplative prayer and study program, and Dr. Mark Brummit will lead a Lenten academic study on the book of Amos. Adults and youth welcome to any and all. [Formation Team: The Rev’d Ruth Ferguson, Kyle Liddell, Kristy Liddell, Jennifer Anstey, John Urban] 

STEWARDSHIP – Pru Kirkpatrick

Stewardship is the ongoing exercise of discernment for individuals and for our parish. The Stewardship Committee specifically plans and organizes the kick-off of the fall campaign. How do we best use the resources we are given?  Programs, ongoing expenses, outreach, to name a few, require dollars. The Stewardship Team works with church leaders to make our parish’s mission possible. The group begins its work in late summer to plan Stewardship events for September through November. More volunteers for this committee are very welcome! If you would like to join us, please contact Pru Kirkpatrick (585) 442-7224.

SUNDAY SCHOOL – Emily Brennan

Sunday School is comprised of two separate components, nursery for younger children, and a lesson for the older kids. Nursery, essentially, keeps younger kids entertained via toys or crafts to better allow their parents to enjoy the service. The lesson for the older kids, is made up of three parts. First, we have five to ten minutes of free time for play and socialization. Then we read one (sometimes both) of that week’s readings from The Children’s Illustrated Bible, and we finish with a craft or activity related to the reading. For questions or more information, feel free to email Emily Brennan at eeb02971@sjfc.edu.

 Crucial Need: Craft supplies, excluding crayons and colored pencils

TUESDAY BOOK GROUP – Shirley Ricker

The Tuesday morning book group reads widely, this year especially so.  We explored David Brooks’  thoughts on “an older moral ecology” in his The Road to Character. In Raymond E. Brown’s The Churches the Apostles Left Behind we read how seven apostolic communities uniquely adapted the Christian message.  We learned how being late in a fast-paced technological world that could be a blessing in Tom Friedman’s  Thank You For Being Late Most recently we discovered how the biographer A.N. Wilson views the apostle Paul in his Paul: the Mind of an Apostle.  Everyone is welcome (drop-ins included) to our worship service at 9 (Eucharist the first two Tuesdays of the month, Morning Prayer the rest of the month) and to the book discussion, coffee, and treats that follow.  Special thanks to Mary Anne Wickett for giving us Morning Prayer, and to Ruth for giving us Eucharist.  

USHERS – Joe McCutchon

The Ushers have gone through a couple of minor changes to make the offertory more inclusive of the congregation at the 11am service. Thus, the plate collection is more interactive, and the elements of bread and wine are presented by someone from the pews other than an usher. Also, it is always helpful to have new volunteers especially for holy days and evening services. 

Finance Report to Christ Church Rochester

28 January 2017

Finance Committee              

Norm Geil, Co-Chair

Meg Mackey, Co-Chair

Kathy Brennan

Ron Vukman

Committee Responsibilities

The Christ Church Finance Committee has the responsibility, in conjunction with the Vestry, Treasurer and Rector, to oversee the financial condition and well-being of the parish. It makes recommendations to the Vestry on all financial matters deemed appropriate by the Committee or requested by the Vestry, including among other activities: preparing an annual budget; monitoring investments and operating expenses and income; arranging for audits; and providing a report for the annual parish meeting.

2018 Budget

Understanding how The Church’s funds are applied – and managing them responsibly – is an important part of the Committee’s charter.

2018 Annual Pledges … Good News!

When we presented the 2017 Budget, it reflected a projected deficit of $63,500. Thanks to YOUR generosity, we reduced that amount by 60%!!! 

And that generosity has continued into 2018. As of 1/22/18, we are down just one pledging unit (household), and the amount of annual pledges has grown, notably in higher amount pledge groups. Our projected “envelopes” income for 2018 is up as well, from $194,000 in 2017, to $206,000 in 2018. Thank you, thank you, thank you!

Grant Status

While not part of the Finance Committee, the Committee supports the efforts of a small but mighty team, led by Warden Deb Vanderbilt, with support from Tom Foster, Peg Britt, Meg Mackey, and Hugh Kierig (member emeritus). 


Christmas and Epiphany 2017-2018

 photo credit and animation- David CFC Jutsum©2017

photo credit and animation- David CFC Jutsum©2017

CHRIST CHURCH        Christmas and Epiphany  2017-2018

Rochester, NY        The SONG                  vol. 3 issue  2

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Ruth's column

The Feast of The Holy Name 2018

“She will bear a son,” the angel spoke from a dream to Joseph, “and you shall call his name Jesus, for he will save his people from their sins.” As otherworldly as the announcement was, yet the naming itself is a very human moment, one bound up in the faithful religious practice of the parents, the name itself  bound up with Jesus’ own human journey. The naming is also a divine moment, one that binds Jesus’ human identity with God, his name meaning, more or less, GOD saves. We call him Jesus in English by way of the Greek: Yeshuah, possibly Yehoshua. As the child derives his own being from the being of God, so His name derives in part from God’s name: ehyeh asher ehyeh, I am who am; I will be with you as who I am – as the child himself carries all the power and promise of Yahweh’s salvation, so the child’s name carries within it all of the power and the promise of the very Name of God. All that I AM meant to the people who waited for him, for Emmanuel, for God with us, the promise of that name fulfilled in the naming of the child.

His name was called Jesus. It was a common name in his day (not uncommon in our own). But unlike other names, the name was given him by the angel before He was conceived in the womb.  Yeshuah was not merely a name Joseph and Mary gave to the child, but from all eternity this child was given the name Yeshuah, the child who is both God and man: the God who saves by becoming man.  The name signifies not only who he is: the name from the moment of the Incarnation becomes holy because it is a name from the depths of God Himself.  

If this strikes us as odd - the idea of the holiness of a NAME – it is probably because what really strikes us as odd is the very idea of the holy, period.  We say the word easily enough - we confess one holy Catholic and apostolic Church: but what does the word really mean to us today?  We can chalk it up to secularism, as always, but the loss of the holy is especially heightened in a culture of increasing narcissm. In a world where we see ourselves at the center – in all of the ways we do that- our righteous notions (guided and misguided) about human progress, consumption of self-help books, our designation of time off as “me time,” It is in true solitude (not me time) that we encounter the holy. 

Holiness can exist only if we believe that we are not the center of being, only if we accept the possibility of something or someone extraordinary beyond our comprehension, only know at least a whiff of fear and trembling at the center of our lives.  For the most part, a holy person today someone who does the right thing. The phrase: holier than thou, says it all.  That’s the narcism, because holiness is not something we aspire to. The holy is so drastically different from us, outside of us, and wholly other. It’s easy to forget this, but when you remember, it hones your vision. [reference to Starbucks coffee cup on the altar]

In its orgins, the Eucharist was actually perceived as an an action rather than human words and human activity.. an intermingling of divine and human activity. There was a time when people were in awe, and waited and watched for the glimmers into the presence of the Divine that went beyond mere doctrine about the Real Presence. That is pretty much what we witness today on the Feast of the Holy Name: the intermingling of Divine and Human activity in such a way that something as simple as a name becomes sacramental. While the rest of the world hunkers in this morning to keep warm and recover from whatever bombastic New Year’s celebrations happened last night, here, in the quiet solitude of this little chapel we witness the turning of time and the waking of new life as we celebrate the naming of a newborn long ago..as we witness the holiness of that event that still surrounds us because the name from the moment of the Incarnation became holy...and like the Eucharist we celebrate in his name, it comes from the depths of God himself.

See you in church,

Ruth+

Did you know that Ruth has a blog? It's beautiful and you can find it here-

https://christchurchrochester.tumblr.com/

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Notes from Stephen Kennedy

MUSIC NOTES FROM STEPHEN

 

The season of Advent is rich with music expressing longing, waiting, impending joy, and celebration. Below are a few examples of anthems and motets that will be performed within Sunday Eucharists by the Christ Church Choir and at Compline by the Schola Cantorum.  

 

Oculi omnium                                                   Charles Wood (1866-1926)

 

Translation: The eyes of all wait upon thee, [O Lord]; and thou givest them their meat in due season.

Thou openest thine hand, and satisfiest the desire of every living thing. Alleluia.

For my flesh is meat indeed, and my blood is drink indeed.

He that eateth my flesh, and drinketh my blood, dwelleth in me, and I in him.Alleluia.

 

Tollite hostias                                                      Camille Saint-Saëns (1835-1921)

Translation: Raise the hosts, and worship God in his holy court. 

May the heaven rejoice, and may the earth dance before the face of God, for He comes. 

Hallelujah!

 

Veni redemptor gentium                                     Jacob Handl (1550-1591)

Translation: Come, redeemer of the peoples, and show the birth from a Virgin; every age shall acclaimthat such a birth befits God.

 

The Lamb                                                              John Tavener (1944-2013)

Little Lamb who made thee 

Dost thou know who made thee 

Gave thee life & bid thee feed. 

By the stream & o'er the mead; 

Gave thee clothing of delight, 

Softest clothing wooly bright; 

Gave thee such a tender voice, 

Making all the vales rejoice!  

Little Lamb who made thee 

Dost thou know who made thee  

Little Lamb I'll tell thee, 

He is called by thy name, 

For he calls himself a Lamb: 

He is meek & he is mild, 

He became a little child: 

I a child & thou a lamb, 

We are called by his name. 

Little Lamb God bless thee.  

 

Ave Maria                                                               Camille Saint-Saëns (1835-1921)

Translation: Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou among women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and in the hour of our death. Amen.

Stephen Kennedy
Music Director
Christ Church Rochester
Instructor of Sacred Music
Eastman School of Music

Bonus!

This improvisation attempts to reflect the bold themes of the Martin Luther’s text of “Nun comma, der Heiden Heiland” which is based on text of Ambrose of Milan (340-397).  All verses of this hymn are not in our hymnal but are listed here as translated by William M. Reynolds.

1 Savior of the nations, come, 
virgin's Son, make here Thy home!
Marvel now, O heav'n and earth,
that the Lord chose such a birth.

2 Not by human flesh and blood,
but the Spirit of our God,
was the Word of God made flesh--
woman's Offspring, pure and fresh.

3 Wondrous birth! O wondrous Child
Of the Virgin undefiled!
Though by all the world disowned,
still to be in heav'n enthroned.

4 From the Father forth He came
and returneth to the same,
captive leading death and hell--
high the song of triumph swell!

5 Thou the Father's only Son,
hast o'er sin the vict'ry won.
Boundless shall Thy kingdom be;
when shall we its glories see?

6 Brightly doth Thy manger shine,
glorious is its light divine.
Let not sin o'ercloud this light;
ever be our faith thus bright.

7 Praise to God the Father sing,
Praise to God the Son, our King,
Praise to God the Spirit be
Ever and eternally. 

 

(I call it Awesome!)

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EVENTS

EVENTS and ANNOUNCEMENTS in This Issue

Capital Campaign Kickoff

Upcoming Music Event Poster

Third Sunday Lecture Series and Compline

Roger Freitas

The Counter Reformation and the Baroque Aesthetic

Latest Sunday Bulletin and Audio of the 11:00 am Eucharist

(when you click on an image below it will become full size and you can scroll through the pages)

12th NIGHT CELEBRATION- audio recording

(although it was the 26th night after Christmas)

Bulletin for the Solemnity of the Nativity 10:30 pm

audio of the Festal Eucharist

ANNUAL MEETING- January 28th, 2018

text of agenda 

Minute Ministries

Candlelight Concert Schedule 2017-2018

The Care Team

GRANTS UPDATE

Vestry Minutes

Capital Campaign Kickoff

Third Sunday Lectures and Compline

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Feast of Christmas Eve (Solemnity of the Nativity)

Christ Church     Annual Parish Meeting     January 28, 2018

Prayer and Rector’s Opening Remarks The Rev’d Ruth Ferguson    

 

Updates/Greetings from Community Partners Bleu Cease, ROCO

Lois Jones, A Meal & More

Chef Alan Callerame & William Drayton

Emily Brennan

Nominations for Warden and Vestry Kyle Liddell

  • Warden for 2-year term
  • Three vestry persons for 3-year terms
  • 1 Vestry person for 1-year fill-in term
  • Open spot for 2-year fill-in term

Open Ballot

Voting members are 18 years or older, have been baptized for at least 12 months, are regular attendants at worship, and contribute to the support of the parish.

Report on Parish ministries

Music Program Lydia Kirkpatrick

Spiritual Formation Kyle Liddell

Outreach Lucie Parfitt

Finance Committee Meg Mackey and Norm Geil

Capital Campaign Lucie Parfitt

Warden’s Remarks Deb VanderBilt

Close Ballot The Rev’d Ruth Ferguson

Closing Prayer The Rev’d Ruth Ferguson

 

REPORT on the Music Program

Stephen Kennedy, Music Director

Christ Church Music Program

Special thanks and appreciation is due to each of you for your participation in music at Christ Church. Whether singing a chant or hymn, listening to a prelude or postlude, or honing a motet in a rehearsal, we are all celebrating something important together as a family through music and we do it with love. We are grateful for the support and work of our Rector Ruth Ferguson, Wardens Deborah Vanderbilt and Kyle Liddell, the Vestry, Pat Knapp, and Moses Roland. We also want to thank our Associate organists David Higgs and William Porter for contributing so generously of their time and talent. They also help with mentoring and teaching our parish musicians and VanDelinder Fellows. Our VanDelinder Fellows Joshua Ehlebracht, Henry Webb, and Alden Wright also deserve tremendous thanks for all their great work in our parish.  Our Eastman-Christ Church Choral Scholar, Adam Sadberry; Choral Scholar, Evan Ritter; and Music Scholar, Thatcher Lyman (Assistant Director of the Schola Cantorum) also contribute greatly to music at Christ Church. It is so exciting to see such growth in liturgical music skills from these dedicated young musicians. We are also extremely grateful to Christopher Huebner, Schola librarian and coordinator, as well as our dedicated teem of Compline Ushers. Continued thanks and appreciation goes to the members of our parish ensembles as listed below:

 

Goals from 2017 – ongoing in 2018

  1. Attract more people to Christ Church through our music program Goal on target
  2. Raise the level of musicianship in CC ensembles Goal on target
  3. Raise community awareness of our rich and diverse music program Goal on target
  4. Foster the education and training of musicians in liturgical music skills Goal on target
  5. Engage people from the larger community (non parishioners) to help fund 

our parish music program Goal on target

  1. Install professional recording equipment in the church to record CC Choir, 

Youth Ensemble, Consort, CC liturgies, and concerts     Working on installation date

7.   Fundraising to support our parish music program Goal on target

8.   Strengthen existing community collaborations and partnerships in music Goal on target

 

Opportunities for individuals to assist and contribute in our parish music program  

  1. Compline ushers and Candle-lighters   Team is in place, but more are welcome
  2. Greeters at Tuesday Pipes to represent the parish   Alan Jones is our regular; others are welcome 
  3. Volunteers to help send publicity to media via e-mail   Help in this would be great
  4. People to help set up for Compline following the 11:00   CC Choir members could use assistance

Eucharist  

  1. People to assist in searching for grants and grant writing     Volunteers needed

REPORTS on Christ Church Programs and Volunteer Opportunities

Along with pledging, the donation of one’s time to parish organizations and working groups has a tremendous impact on the vitality of the church. Below you’ll see a list of all the groups and tasks working at Christ Church. Groups with a crucial need have those needs in bold print, but all the groups welcome new volunteers. Please read the list and see what might match your interests and skills. 

A MEAL AND MORE – Lois Jones

 

In order to sustain, A Meal and More, now beginning its 39th year, it takes the cooperation and effort of: Christ Church Rochester; A Meal and More, Inc. Board Members; Hundreds of Volunteers, from both Episcopal and non-Episcopal churches; an experienced and competent Chef; a pleasant and watchful Greeter and a germ conscious and helpful Dishwasher.

It is truly startling to find out that 1 out of every 6 people in the United States is considered food challenged. 8130 meals were served during 2017 by A Meal and More. The Elderly are a very consistent presence. Between 140 and 270 meals were served to them every month this year, as compared to between 150 and 200 meals per month last year. The number of meals to Children nearly doubled with 40 meals per month being served to Children compared to approximately 25 meals per month last year. Adults – make up the largest group we feed with approximately 500 meals served to this group each month which is down by about 100 meals per month from last year but those meals are now being served to the Elderly and Children. 

The 3 men who faithfully feed our Urban poor are: Allen Callerame, Chef; William Drayton, Greeter and Nick Donofrio, Dishwasher.

We want to THANK all the members of Christ Church for your faithful and continued support of A Meal and More, Inc.’s Ministry. --Lois Jones, Vice President and Kristy Liddell, Volunteer Coordinator 

ALTAR GUILD – Bill Soleim

 

The Altar Guild is a group of men and women who works mostly behind the scenes to prepare for services on Sunday. Our ministry involves caring for the vestments, vessels, and altar linens of Christ Church. We usually work in pairs to set up for Sunday’s services at 9:30 on Saturday morning (for about 1 hour). After the 11:00 service, we take about 20 minutes to wash communion vessels and put away vestments. We each serve one a week per month, but many of us also work together on Christmas and Easter to decorate the sanctuary. If you think you would enjoy serving God and our congregation in this quiet ministry, please contact Bill Soleim. 

Crucial need: A partner for an altar guild member currently serving alone on SECOND and FOURTH Sundays of the month.

ANGEL TREES – Eleanor Peet

 

This outreach program is the collection of Christmas gifts for the women clients, and their families, of the Willow Domestic Violence Center (formerly known as Alternatives for Battered Women). The Center provides us with a wish list. Paper Angels with suggestions written on them decorate two trees that are placed in the sanctuary and the Guild Room each December. Parishioners take an angel or two and bring their gifts unwrapped back to church to be brought to the Center mid-December. Willow Center says: “over 70% of domestic violence crimes are witnessed by children. A simple gesture of providing new toys during their stay can give a child in crisis a sense of normalcy and hope.”

 

BIRTHDAY CARDS – Carolyn Mauro

A delightful task that we on the birthday card team have is to send greetings to every member of our parish family whose birthday we have on record at the parish office. This is a small but, we’ve heard, enjoyed yearly acknowledgment of your importance to our parish family—you’re all a vital part of us. We’re all grateful for your presence and giving of your talents to Christ Church’s mission, so the cards are a small but sincere reminder of that to you. Crucial Need: Several members have not shared their “special day” with us, and if you have chosen not to participate, we understand. However, if you have been with Christ Church for a while and have not been acknowledged, or if you are new to us, and would like to receive a yearly card, please notify the parish office at your earliest convenience. Thank you.

A GIFT AND A PROMISE CAPITAL CAMPAIGN COMMITTEE REPORT – Joe Schaller

The members of the committee are: The Rev. Ruth Ferguson; Gail Lynch; Lucy Parfitt; Joseph Schaller, chairperson; Bill Soleim; John Urban; and Deb Vanderbilt. The committee is grateful for the opportunity to serve Christ Church.

The Christ Church building needs repair. If we are to continue to worship and fulfill our great commission, as Christians, in this building, the repairs must be done as soon as possible. Because our operating funds are insufficient to pay for the capital improvements, the Christ Church Vestry decided to initiate a capital campaign. A campaign committee was formed, and the campaign was named A Gift and a Promise. Your Gift is for our near-term needs and it is also a Promise – because it secures our future. The campaign goal is $1 million. Demonstrating their commitment to the campaign each member of the vestry has pledged a gift. 

In the spring of 2017 a capital campaign consultant was briefly retained. Dissatisfied with the consultant, the relationship was terminated, and the capital campaign committee assumed the responsibilities for the day-to-day operational management of the campaign. The committee has been meeting on a weekly basis since August 2017. Campaign polices, collateral materials and an administrative infrastructure were created. Fundraising plans were determined and initiated for parishioners, friends of Christ Church and external organizations. 

To date the campaign has raised through gifts, pledges and grants… Apologies for the tease but to find out the amount raised and other important details of the campaign, and your vital role we cordially invite you to A Gift and a Promise kick-off celebration on Sunday, February 11 following the 11 AM service. 

CARE TEAM – Norma Kurmis and Elizabeth Dugdale

The Meals Care Team has 8 active members. We have provided several meals to 4 families since the summer. The team will bring meals on a temporary basis to parishioners who have suffered bereavement, have a new baby or are home from the hospital, for example. If anyone knows of a family who could use a little extra help with a meal or two, please contact Ruth with your request. Sometimes the requests can come in quickly, so anyone who is willing to donate their time and meal-prep skills to the team would be welcomed! If you are interested in joining us, please let me know at lotusmom2000@hotmail.com.

Home Visits currently has 10 members who arrange amongst themselves to go a visit a fellow member of our church when notified who is in need of a little bit of society but cannot get to church! We have (luckily) only been called upon to arrange visits for a total of 3 fellow church members over the past year. I believe we have done a good job in dividing up the visits and find these interactions & chances to socialize highly rewarding, but as the head of this group, I confess: I have done a poor job in double checking in with my teammates and apologize...Sorry ya'll! We are always welcoming more people to add their name to the list to go visit a church family members when they are in need of some company so please email Elizabeth Dugdale at emother@gmail.com if you would like to join! (And/or if you have any suggestions).  If you need a meal or a visit from the Care Team, call or email the Rector and she will let the Care Team know.  

COMMUNICATION COMMITTEE – Kyle Liddell

The communications committee is composed of the maintainers of the CC website, The Song, the Facebook page, our paper brochures and advertisements, and other publicity efforts.  Follow our church activities in The Song and on Facebook and share them with others.

FORUM – Mary Vukman

The Forum is a study and discussion group that meets on Sunday mornings.   Most recently, we have been reading the Letter of James slowly and inquisitively.  We ask a lot of questions and toss around a lot of maybe's, hoping to better understand our our Christian heritage and calling.  Watch the bulletin for a new topic coming soon.   Then join us any Sunday 9:45 -10:45 am in the Guild Room. 

FOYERS – Val Jutsum

Foyers is our name for small informal groups of Christ Church parishioners who meet for a meal. They are a wonderful way, whether you are relatively new to the church or a long-time member, to meet and get to know other Christ Church members.

Foyers groups are composed of 6-8 people who meet once a month in each others’ homes for a simple dinner. Each person hosts one dinner during the “season,” and it is a simple dinner (not potluck) lasting from about 6 to 9 p.m.  There is no agenda, just fun and fellowship! Because of Rochester weather, the “Foyers season” at Christ Church is April to October.  

Do you have small children? In the past, we have offered the choice to specify if you would like to be in a group with others with small children. Please note your choice about that when signing up below.

Are you thinking “I don’t have space for 8-10 people to sit around a dining table”? Don't let that stop you! Dinners can be informal--we can balance plates on our laps! We can picnic! All who want to be part of Foyers are welcome.

This past Foyer Season didn’t occur. The number of interested participants wasn’t enough to make a group(s). 

Crucial need: Interested people to eat a meal and have fun.

CHANCEL TEAM: Acolyte, Crucifer, Subdeacon, Thurifer, Verger – Jim Bement

 

At all celebrations of the Liturgy, it is fitting that the principal celebrant, whether bishop or priest, be assisted by other priests, and by deacons and lay persons.” (BCP, 322 & 354).  When serving at the altar, members of the chancel team are fulfilling those directions of the Book of Common Prayer. We are aware that the purpose of assisting at the altar is “that God may be glorified.” Since last year’s report, we have added 5 members to the Team including 1 youth.  To reinitiate the position of Verger in our services we will need two or three additional members.  Training as to what to do as well as why we do it will be provided at your convenience.  Please contact me or the Rector if you wish to explore this service to our parish and to God. --Jim Bement, 585.734.5756, jhbement@rochester.rr.com

JAZZ FESTIVAL – Carlos Mercado

 

Each June, our parish welcomes over 6,000 music lovers to our building to enjoy what has become one of the four top jazz festivals in the world and the largest gathering of British Isles musicians outside of England.  This was the tenth year that we have hosted the “Made In the UK” Series, and it is possible only because of a group of dedicated parish and community volunteers.  Having been designed as a Community Outreach event, it covers our out-of-pocket costs and affords an opportunity to showcase our historic building.  As a result of the festival and press coverage, the name “Christ Church Rochester, NY” is well known in UK jazz circles, and we enjoy an excellent reputation for our hospitality and the quality of our facilities.  We look forward to our 11th year in just a few months. Team: Carlos Mercado. Joe and Vicki McCutcheon

COFFEE HOUR, SCHOOL 9, MEALS for NEW PARENTS, WEDDINGS & SPECIAL EVENTS [phew!]         – Vicki McCutchon

Coffee hour is a well- oiled machine.  We have a great crew that continue to provide tasty and quenching treats and bring us all together to catch up with one another.

This is a fun year for weddings and Meals for New Parents, because we have sisters having babies within weeks of one another and we have two parishioner weddings this summer.  In addition to our two parishioner weddings there are 4 other weddings on the books.  The goal is eight weddings a year and I do believe we will make our goal.  The church hosted 8 weddings in 2017.

I am happy to say that School #9 has quite a few churches helping them out.  My contact still wants us to stay on board for school supplies which I do in conjunction with Christ Church Pittsford.  I always enjoy working with the ladies from CCP as we put the school bags and uniform items together for the excited students.  School #9 knows though they can always contact us if there is a need.

We continue to host our annual events of the Antiphon celebration in December and 12th Night or in this year’s case our Epiphany Celebration and the Annual Meeting Luncheon held in January.  A wedding reception and dinner was held after a small wedding service this past November and was very well received.  Three funeral receptions were held also this past year.  We also had a going away luncheon for Marianne this past summer.

GARDEN – Deb VanderBilt

The garden group—Kitty Jospe, Lois & Alan Jones, Deb VanderBilt, Tom Foster, Joe McCutchon and other parish members and Sagamore residents—had a good year in the garden due to plentiful rain. Many neighbors and visitors are in our garden on a daily basis, and we get appreciative comments about its beauty all the time. We love sharing the garden with ROCO art as well.  We dealt with vandalism to the center urn by strengthening its core, and believe it is more immune from efforts to push it over now. We can always use more hands during the early summer weeding season and the fall leaf-raking season. Contributions that go primarily toward mulching costs (about $2,000/year) are always welcome. 

Crucial Need: We announce our garden work days in advance in the bulletin and responses to those work days are what would be most helpful for this group. 

LECTORS AND INTERCESSORS – Kevin Finnigan

The Lectors and Intercessors are responsible for reading the lessons and Prayers of the People at services throughout the year.  Parishioners who are interested and not yet members of “the team” are encouraged to join us.  Lectors read about 4-5 times a year, and Intercessors about once a month. 

PROPERTY COMMITTEE – Kyle Liddell

The Property Committee monitors the status of the building and property, and works with external organizations for larger repair efforts. Over the past year, we have been working towards our Lawn Street Wall repair (which will happen this summer!), coordinating with the Campaign Committee in planning for the remaining work in the nave, investigating lighting improvements, and managing roof and other building maintenance.

QUILTERS – Ann Piato

We have presented 36 handmade quilts to newly baptized members as they join Christ Church, 31 for infants and 5 for adults (3 for staff). We also made the quilt hanging in the hallway in honor of the 150th anniversary of the founding of the Church. Lucy Alonzo and Marianne Sickles received quilts in honor of their service to Christ Church, and we made a quilt for Ruth Ferguson to honor her first year as our rector (with pieces of fabric donated by the congregation). The quilters of Christ Church are Eleanor Peet, Ann Piato and Pat Kingsley.

RAIHN – Beatrice Deshommes

Rochester Area Interfaith Hospitality Network (RAIHN) helps homeless families become independent by providing shelter, food and case management.  Community churches provide housing and/or volunteers to support this work. We are in need of more volunteers to help sustain this ministry. 

Go to  www.raihn.org for more information. Contact Beatrice Deshommes 585-880-7029 for information on becoming a Christ Church RAIHN volunteer

SANCTUARY AT CHRIST CHURCH – Lucie Parfitt and Rev. Ruth Ferguson

“Sanctuary at Christ Church” is an outreach support team, with “sanctuary” being a symbolic term for how we serve Christ with our building and with our hearts. In addition to supporting  A Meal and More, RAIHN, and the Angel Tree, we invited parishioners to participate in “Walk for Water” for Sudan; an interfaith gathering at Temple B’rith Kodesh to support Project Homeless Connect; a harvest dinner to honor farm workers, and hosted  the Drawdown Series (climate advocacy)in the Guild Room. [Outreach Team: the Rev’d Ruth Ferguson, Lucie Parfitt, and Sue Hughes Smith]

 

 

SONG – Val Jutsum

The SONG is the newsletter for Christ Church Rochester. It is a digital publication that changes themes with the seasons of the liturgical year. The actual content changes frequently, as often as daily, sometimes. It includes eight distinct sections. They are the cover section (Song) which has an editor’s note, Ruth’s essay, and Stephen Kennedy’s music notes. The next section is a blog of Ruth’s sermons in audio form. The section called News and Events has activities and things parishioners wish to share with the other members of the parish and due to the world wide audience of the internet, the world. The music event gallery shows the ongoing music activities and contributors and the chapel gallery is a collection of photographs of the Mary Chapel intended for the private reflection of our visitors as an aid to prayer and meditation. There is a contact page where anyone can leave a message, suggestion, or comment. The archive section has all of the back issues, but because it is set up like a blog post, the most recent issue is on top and the previous issues are below in chronological order going back to the very first issue. There is also a donate section. This is set up to take credit card donations. Anyone, parishioner or casual visitor can make a donation, by credit card from this page.

We also send out a small number of paper printed copies for those parishioners who have requested it, typically people who do not have access to a computer, tablet, smartphone, or internet.

The SONG also contains in every section, lots of music and art, much of it original. It can’t be seen anywhere but here. The music is taken from our service recordings as well as professionally made recordings of the Schola Cantorum. It is world class.

Below is a breakdown of the number of visits the SONG had last year and last month.

My hope for the SONG is that people would enjoy reading it, share it with their friends, both in the parish and outside it, and invest themselves creatively by submitting items for publication. We have a very talented and dedicated group of people. I want them to use their voices. I want them to be seen and heard.

SPIRITUAL FORMATION – Kyle Liddell and Rev. Ruth Ferguson

This year we have a “formation team” planning and creating programs for study, prayer, and faith sharing throughout the 2017-2018 academic year. In October/November we held book study on NT Wright’s “Surprised by Hope: Rethinking Heaven, the Resurrection, and the Mission of the Church.” In November/December, we welcomed the Rev’d Bill Peterson to three lunch studies to present on the history and theology of Advent and its liturgies from his book, “What are We Waiting For? Re-imagining Advent for Time to Come.”  In January / February, the Rector will lead an Inquirer’s Class for those new to the Episcopal Church and/or seeking  baptism, confirmation or reception into the church.  In February/ March, the Formation Team will lead a contemplative prayer and study program, and Dr. Mark Brummit will lead a Lenten academic study on the book of Amos. Adults and youth welcome to any and all. [Formation Team: The Rev’d Ruth Ferguson, Kyle Liddell, Kristy Liddell, Jennifer Anstey, John Urban] 

STEWARDSHIP – Pru Kirkpatrick

Stewardship is the ongoing exercise of discernment for individuals and for our parish. The Stewardship Committee specifically plans and organizes the kick-off of the fall campaign. How do we best use the resources we are given?  Programs, ongoing expenses, outreach, to name a few, require dollars. The Stewardship Team works with church leaders to make our parish’s mission possible. The group begins its work in late summer to plan Stewardship events for September through November. More volunteers for this committee are very welcome! If you would like to join us, please contact Pru Kirkpatrick (585) 442-7224.

SUNDAY SCHOOL – Emily Brennan

Sunday School is comprised of two separate components, nursery for younger children, and a lesson for the older kids. Nursery, essentially, keeps younger kids entertained via toys or crafts to better allow their parents to enjoy the service. The lesson for the older kids, is made up of three parts. First, we have five to ten minutes of free time for play and socialization. Then we read one (sometimes both) of that week’s readings from The Children’s Illustrated Bible, and we finish with a craft or activity related to the reading. For questions or more information, feel free to email Emily Brennan at eeb02971@sjfc.edu.

 Crucial Need: Craft supplies, excluding crayons and colored pencils

TUESDAY BOOK GROUP – Shirley Ricker

The Tuesday morning book group reads widely, this year especially so.  We explored David Brooks’  thoughts on “an older moral ecology” in his The Road to Character. In Raymond E. Brown’s The Churches the Apostles Left Behind we read how seven apostolic communities uniquely adapted the Christian message.  We learned how being late in a fast-paced technological world that could be a blessing in Tom Friedman’s  Thank You For Being Late Most recently we discovered how the biographer A.N. Wilson views the apostle Paul in his Paul: the Mind of an Apostle.  Everyone is welcome (drop-ins included) to our worship service at 9 (Eucharist the first two Tuesdays of the month, Morning Prayer the rest of the month) and to the book discussion, coffee, and treats that follow.  Special thanks to Mary Anne Wickett for giving us Morning Prayer, and to Ruth for giving us Eucharist.  

USHERS – Joe McCutchon

The Ushers have gone through a couple of minor changes to make the offertory more inclusive of the congregation at the 11am service. Thus, the plate collection is more interactive, and the elements of bread and wine are presented by someone from the pews other than an usher. Also, it is always helpful to have new volunteers especially for holy days and evening services. 

Finance Report to Christ Church Rochester

28 January 2017

Finance Committee               

Norm Geil, Co-Chair

Meg Mackey, Co-Chair

Kathy Brennan

Ron Vukman

Committee Responsibilities

The Christ Church Finance Committee has the responsibility, in conjunction with the Vestry, Treasurer and Rector, to oversee the financial condition and well-being of the parish. It makes recommendations to the Vestry on all financial matters deemed appropriate by the Committee or requested by the Vestry, including among other activities: preparing an annual budget; monitoring investments and operating expenses and income; arranging for audits; and providing a report for the annual parish meeting.

2018 Budget

Understanding how The Church’s funds are applied – and managing them responsibly – is an important part of the Committee’s charter.

2018 Annual Pledges … Good News!

When we presented the 2017 Budget, it reflected a projected deficit of $63,500. Thanks to YOUR generosity, we reduced that amount by 60%!!! 

And that generosity has continued into 2018. As of 1/22/18, we are down just one pledging unit (household), and the amount of annual pledges has grown, notably in higher amount pledge groups. Our projected “envelopes” income for 2018 is up as well, from $194,000 in 2017, to $206,000 in 2018. Thank you, thank you, thank you!

Grant Status

While not part of the Finance Committee, the Committee supports the efforts of a small but mighty team, led by Warden Deb Vanderbilt, with support from Tom Foster, Peg Britt, Meg Mackey, and Hugh Kierig (member emeritus). 

Advent 2017

  above cover-  Advent- acrylic on canvas ©2007 Tim Jutsum

above cover-Advent- acrylic on canvas ©2007 Tim Jutsum

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An open letter to Go Bags

Dear Go Bags,

I hope you won’t think me impertinent, referring to you by your new name. But, in fact I only learned of your name last week while listening to a news report about the fires in California. We had been companions on other adventures a few years ago. Perhaps you remember? You would be  ready with various things in anticipation of the arrival of a new member of our family. I admit that I mostly neglected you on those outings. As it turned out, I never stayed long enough to need your services. I commend your faithfulness, though. You were always at the ready and always on the job.

I understand that your new work is much more stressful. I heard that you wait by the door, as you did for me. But, now, instead of a baby, a dangerous undertaking in itself as I’m sure you’ll agree, you wait for notice of evacuation to flee an inferno. I admit I had not considered, at all, the dark side of your purpose. Yet, now that it has come to my attention I realize you have always done such work. You are the bag to take when people need to go. You are the bag that carries their choices of what is really important.  

Oh Go Bag, I realize now, that you are just the thing to consider when thinking about Advent.  Be ready. Be vigilant. Know what is important. It is Go or No Go. Be ready to GO.

I realize you were with Them. You made the trip from Nazareth in Galilee to Judea, to the city of David called Bethlehem. That time you were waiting for a baby. So many envy you that trip, although, at the time, I’m sure it didn’t appear to be what it actually was, the WORD made flesh, come among us. Although, a few figured it out. We aren’t waiting for a baby anymore. We do wait in joyful hope of the personal appearance of God again, but, not a baby this time. This time will be the change of everything. Yes, we wait in joyful hope. 

It turns out that hope is what you’re all about, isn’t it? People flee with you in hope of a salvation from war, horror, oppression, famine, fire. You represent our hope as you force us to decide what we care about, what we can go on with. You are bigger than your physical identity. You, Go Bag, by representing Advent, will always be with us, now. You inspire us to be ready to choose to cast away the works of darkness and put on the armor of light now…that at the last day we may rise with Him to Life immortal. I once heard God’s Grace defined as His Love active. We chose to have you hold Grace for us and in that way we will be ready for our dearest longings. Thank you, dear Go Bags, thank you.

Best Wishes,

Val Jutsum

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A sense of something deep, of something more: don’t stop being ready: a few short musings on Advent; SPOILER ALERT: there is no strong conclusion. 

by- David Jutsum

Advent is my favorite season in the church year (which is probably true about every season. But, right now, it’s Advent, so Advent wins, right now.) In Advent we are given a sense of something deep, something more, something in the form of a longing. There’s a feeling in your spirit that there is something on the outside that is reaching out to you, on the inside. There is something coming, there’s more, it’s going to happen. It is like a giant storm, full of beauty, majesty, awe. Advent is about deep things, things too deep for words. things of the spirit. In all probability, the most important things, because, what could be more important than that which the whole Christian world has looked forward to since the first coming? This message comes through words, through hymns, through images, hints and deeply personal experiences.

Advent is a cliffhanger. The Lord is coming again, at a time when we least expect him. When will that be? Nobody knows. Will it happen? Yes, definitely. In the old Saturday morning movie serials, the cliffhanger from last week would be resolved in mere moments: the barrel of dynamite which was about to explode bounced out of the wagon when it rolled over a bump, and exploded harmlessly in some sagebrush. Now, onto this week’s plot. The Advent cliffhanger is a two way street: he is coming in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye: will we be ready?  The five foolish virgins who did not have enough oil stopped being ready. Will I? We are perpetually left waiting for the beginning of the next episode. As of yet, it remains unresolved.

Advent is also like reading science fiction. There is all kinds of wildness, weirdness, creatures, warning, foreboding. You know, end of the world stuff.

Advent is about death. In my way of looking, the Second Coming happens every time someone dies, at least for that person. That which is mortal is swallowed up by Life. “Hark, a thrilling voice is sounding: Christ is nigh, it seems to say!”

Advent is also the time of many important life events for me, personally. My mother died in Advent, when I was sixteen years old. Six  years later, I entered into a deep personal relationship with God, during Advent. two years later, our first son was born, seven weeks premature, on the second Sunday of Advent. 

Advent is a time when God has frequently spoken to me. (I do not hear voices when God speaks to me. Usually, there is a scripture passage which pierces into some place deep inside what I call my spirit. Other times it could happen when someone says something. “Give it to the Lord” is such an example from our lives. We would bring our laundry list of complex problems to our parish priest, and his answer was often, “Well, just give it to the Lord”.  At first it was infuriating, but it stood the test of time, and has achieved mantra status.)

Do you believe in the Holy Spirit? I do. I believe in the Holy Spirit. Let’s talk about the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit is God, but we hardly ever talk about him. Sometimes I do. But I kind of put Him on a shelf, if I had to be honest about it. Maybe it’s possible that the Holy Spirit is the home of the mysterious, the brooding, the wonderful, the communication to your spirit from God. You get these inklings, these hints, this super sense of Otherness; Otherness which is there, but not in any hurry to reveal itself, yet it’s there for the taking. You can’t just like manhandle it. You can’t just grab it. I don’t know how you get it. I guess, you mostly just receive it. Back in the old days, it could come in vague feelings. Those WOW moments when it was like, “Wow! I just experienced something intense! I wonder what it was?” I remember some large foundation stones on a church on St. Paul Street, on the way to work. They were marked with moisture stains in melancholy patterns,  which evoked this sense of grandeur and sadness. I believe that was one way the Holy Spirit was informing me that I was actually involved in the midst of drama of the highest degree.

I want to end this mishmash by giving an example from when our first child, David Charles Frederick Cook Jutsum, was born way too soon. After several days, while he was still in intensive care, we sat in the hospital cafeteria, at our wits’ end. A bible verse came to mind: “I go to prepare a place for you. Let not your heart be troubled. For I shall return and dwell with you. Neither be afraid.” It was like magic. We realized that our job was to go home and prepare Davey’s place. It was implied, God would take care of the rest. He was home, under the tree, before Christmas. 

Oftentimes, the Book of Common Prayer has the knack of translating an intensely personal experience into beautiful words: We beseech thee, Almighty God, to purify our consciences by thy daily visitation , that when thy Son Jesus Christ cometh he may find in us a mansion prepared for himself; through the same Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen

 art above: Hannah Sommers ©2011 watercolor

art above: Hannah Sommers ©2011 watercolor

Ruth's column

The Second Sunday of Advent in the Early Morning

When I entered the sacristy early last Sunday morning,  the colors in the windows were  beginning to emerge in the early morning light - light from the dark. When a rich yellow morning beam shone a path across the floor, I stepped into it and declared to Norm and Paddy, our faithful 8:00 am sacristan and deacon, “Look at that light! The Kingom of God has come!”

Soon, we would enter the chapel where the second candle of Advent would be lit to signal our preparation for the Master of this House. I was reminded of the old adage, “It is better to light a single candle than to curse the darkness.” We do find ourselves cursing the darkness, cursing change, cursing the economy, cynical about the prospects of peace for Jerusalem or anywhere on earth, frenetic  and frustrated in our complicity with the commercialization of Christmas and getting our shopping done.

Then, I thought, we will soon light the third candle of Advent, and then the fourth , they will burn quietly at our altar, another sign in this season of new life to come. It is such a simple act, to light a candle, yet how incredible profound! Just as God acted out our salvation in the simple act of giving a child to a peasant woman – a strange prescription, was it not, for the sickness of humanity? St. Paul said it so well when he wrote of the “foolishness of God” being wiser than the “wisdom of men.”

These tiny flames, lit by the parishoners of Christ Church each week of Advent, signal a hope burning in the midst of our turbulent times – a hope whose fulfillment is beyond the understanding of economists, world leaders, philosophers and theologians.  Who can understand or explain this event we are awaiting? Words fail us. But when I rang the bell for the early morning service, I wasn’t thinking about what words I could use. I was thinking about the light that had shone in the sacristy, and the light that would be burning on two purple candles in the chapel.

See you in church,

Ruth+

 

The Feast of All Saints

“O blest communion, fellowship divine!

We feebly struggle, they in glory shine;

Yet all are one in thee,

For all are thine.

Alleluia, alleluia!”

 

  • Hymn #287, “For all the saints, who from their labors rest”

 

As many of you know, I fully engage in that hallmark of our Anglican identity, which is openness to ambiguity! My faith is as much about the love of questions as the certainties. When it comes to All Saints Day, I am blessed with certainty.  For as long as I can remember, it has never occurred to me that the people I love who have died don’t hear me when I pray for them.  In fact, before I was taught anything different, I used to pray TO my grandmother. She was the first person I loved and lost. We called her “Angel.” 

For a time after Angel died, she became a regular fixture in my bed time prayer routine. After the Lord’s Prayer, I would give my attention to Angel. I went through God, of course.  I asked God to quiet the streets of heaven so that a message could get through and be heard by my grandmother. It never occurred to me that God didn’t quiet everyone in Heaven briefly to sound my message through the streets by broadcasting my own voice saying the words to Him: “Hi, Angel, it’s Ruth. How are you doing? I am doing fine. I miss you. I love you.”

All of these years later, it still does not occur to me that the ones I love and see no longer do not receive my prayers and join me there. It never occurs to me that we have not been knit together into one communion and fellowship in the mystical body of Christ.

I no longer picture cobbled, Heavenly streets with people bustling about but pausing when prayers and other announcements are given over the celestial intercom. When I am in that space where wordless, contemplative prayer delivers me, I am one with the God who is all in all. All who came before, all who are now, all who will come after; all of time, before time, and beyond time; all of what we can see, know, or believe and all of what we can’t see, know or believe.  The mystics call this “unitive seeing,” but it’s not reserved for mystics only. In this seeing, or “space,” I know beyond any doubt that I am communing with God in whom we live, move and have our being, and communing with all being that lives, moves, and has itself in God! 

Baptisms, Eucharists, music, prayer, liturgies – these guide us to the crossroads, the touch stone,  of the Saints in Heaven and on Earth. But Heaven and earth are also joined together within us when we give ourselves fully over to the presence of God. I no longer envision a veil between Heaven and earth that is temporarily lifted from time to time. I imagine that the great cloud of witnesses surrounding us is as near and present as Lawn Street is outside my office window. As are the saints of God, the souls of our loved ones died to this life, we ourselves and every other living thing that fills the overflowing cup who is God.

See you in church,

Ruth+

 

Did you know that Ruth has a blog? It's beautiful and you can find it here-

https://christchurchrochester.tumblr.com/

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Notes from Stephen Kennedy

MUSIC NOTES FROM STEPHEN

 

The season of Advent is rich with music expressing longing, waiting, impending joy, and celebration. Below are a few examples of anthems and motets that will be performed within Sunday Eucharists by the Christ Church Choir and at Compline by the Schola Cantorum.  

 

Oculi omnium                                                   Charles Wood (1866-1926)

 

Translation: The eyes of all wait upon thee, [O Lord]; and thou givest them their meat in due season.

Thou openest thine hand, and satisfiest the desire of every living thing. Alleluia.

For my flesh is meat indeed, and my blood is drink indeed.

He that eateth my flesh, and drinketh my blood, dwelleth in me, and I in him.Alleluia.

 

Tollite hostias                                                      Camille Saint-Saëns (1835-1921)

Translation: Raise the hosts, and worship God in his holy court. 

May the heaven rejoice, and may the earth dance before the face of God, for He comes. 

Hallelujah!

 

Veni redemptor gentium                                     Jacob Handl (1550-1591)

Translation: Come, redeemer of the peoples, and show the birth from a Virgin; every age shall acclaimthat such a birth befits God.

 

The Lamb                                                              John Tavener (1944-2013)

Little Lamb who made thee 

Dost thou know who made thee 

Gave thee life & bid thee feed. 

By the stream & o'er the mead; 

Gave thee clothing of delight, 

Softest clothing wooly bright; 

Gave thee such a tender voice, 

Making all the vales rejoice!  

Little Lamb who made thee 

Dost thou know who made thee  

Little Lamb I'll tell thee, 

He is called by thy name, 

For he calls himself a Lamb: 

He is meek & he is mild, 

He became a little child: 

I a child & thou a lamb, 

We are called by his name. 

Little Lamb God bless thee.  

 

Ave Maria                                                               Camille Saint-Saëns (1835-1921)

Translation: Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou among women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and in the hour of our death. Amen.

Stephen Kennedy
Music Director
Christ Church Rochester
Instructor of Sacred Music
Eastman School of Music

Bonus!

This improvisation attempts to reflect the bold themes of the Martin Luther’s text of “Nun comma, der Heiden Heiland” which is based on text of Ambrose of Milan (340-397).  All verses of this hymn are not in our hymnal but are listed here as translated by William M. Reynolds.

1 Savior of the nations, come, 
virgin's Son, make here Thy home!
Marvel now, O heav'n and earth,
that the Lord chose such a birth.

2 Not by human flesh and blood,
but the Spirit of our God,
was the Word of God made flesh--
woman's Offspring, pure and fresh.

3 Wondrous birth! O wondrous Child
Of the Virgin undefiled!
Though by all the world disowned,
still to be in heav'n enthroned.

4 From the Father forth He came
and returneth to the same,
captive leading death and hell--
high the song of triumph swell!

5 Thou the Father's only Son,
hast o'er sin the vict'ry won.
Boundless shall Thy kingdom be;
when shall we its glories see?

6 Brightly doth Thy manger shine,
glorious is its light divine.
Let not sin o'ercloud this light;
ever be our faith thus bright.

7 Praise to God the Father sing,
Praise to God the Son, our King,
Praise to God the Spirit be
Ever and eternally. 

 

(I call it Awesome!)

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EVENTS

EVENTS and ANNOUNCEMENTS in This Issue

Upcoming Music Event Poster

Lessons and Carols

3rd Sunday Lecture series with Nancy Norwood "What about Joseph?"

      Latest Sunday Bulletin and Audio of the 11:00 am Eucharist

(when you click on an image below it will become full size and you can scroll through the pages)

 Minute Ministries

Candlelight Concert Schedule 2017-2018

Episcopal Relief and Development

The Care Team

GRANTS UPDATE

Vestry Minutes


Episcopal Relief and Development

How about some lovely farm animals as a gift this Christmas? Or maybe a nice micro loan? I have to admit that I've never put farm animals on my list of things to get. I'm actually not a fan of farm animals. I have, however, wished for a micro loan, back in the day when we were a younger family. The opportunity to be creative is something that is so close sometimes, yet just out of reach for some of us. This is particularly true if you live in a place where food security is more hope than reality. A lot of people live in that place. It's not always just about location. Helping people make their hopes of opportunity come true this Christmas may be the very thing God is asking you to do. If you are inclined to want to make this a farm animal Christmas for someone who has this at the top of their wish list, check this out- http://www.episcopalrelief.org


The Care Team

is here to help

 

The Christ Church Care Team is a volunteer ministry to help parishioners on a temporary basis as they recover from surgery, suffer the death of a loved one, are home bound or in the hospital, or need support due to another kind of loss or difficult transition. The Care Team assists parishioners in need with the following: shopping, meals, pet care, house help, phone calls to check in, and home and hospital visits. Please notify the Rector if you or someone you know could use Care Team support. [Care Team Leaders: Shirley Ricker, Norma Kurmis, Lydia Worboys, Peg Britt, Elizabeth Dugdale, Kyle Liddell and Jim Blake]


Grants Update

WE GOT GRANTS!

GRANT UPDATE- December 19, 2017

 

The Christ Church grant team is thrilled to announce that the church was granted a New York State historical preservation grant for just over $106,000. The grant team applied for these funds to fix the six clerestory windows, which have damaged sills, frames, and panes, and therefore have let water into the building, which is partially responsible for the piece of the ceiling that fell from the North Aisle a couple of years ago. (The other element responsible was the roof on that aisle, which has already been repaired.) This work will be scheduled for Summer 2020. The grant team was inspired by the successful application by Ron Vukman to get a similar grant from NYS in 2009. It is rare to get a second grant in such a short time, and the grant team is grateful to everyone who helped by supplying us with information, especially Stephen Kennedy and Norm Geil. We are also so grateful for our partners Meal & More and The Father’s House, whose leadership wrote supporting letters to us, and to those in the community who also wrote letters supporting our application. 

 

Deb VanderBilt is also especially grateful to Val Jutsum, who happened to be at home within reach of her phone at the moment before Deb hit the “Submit” button on the grant website. Val and Deb claimed the verse “where 2 or 3 are gathered” and prayed for a successful outcome.  : )   Thanks to the whole grant team:  Deb VanderBilt, Tom Foster, Meg Mackey, Peg Britt, and Hugh Kierig.

 

This brings our grant total for repair work to $148,000.  These grant funds will go a long way toward helping the church pay for repair of the Lawn St. wall and the Nave repair and repainting projects.

Below is the original posting about our Grant process and hopes. I left it in to underline how wonderfully these prayers were answered.-ed.

 

old news

[The grant-writing team (Deb VanderBilt, Tom Foster, Meg Mackey, Peg Britt, and Hugh Kierig) has finished this year’s round of applications. In general, grants are available in the historic preservation category; in other words, we have to specify a building project and the grant will go toward repairs. Here’s an update on where we are with our grants.

 

In January, we applied for a grant from Sacred Sites (a part of the New York Conservancy Trust) for $50,000 for our buckling wall on Lawn Street. We received $25,000, which the grant administrator told us is typically the upper limit of what they award. We must match that grant 50-50 (no problem, since the wall repairs will cost at least $130K).

 

In May, we applied for two grants for the wall as well: to the Rochester Community Foundation Grant for $25,000 and to the Partners for Sacred Places for an unspecified amount (the first step is a “letter of intent”). We should hear from RCF in October, and we already heard we did not make the first cut from Partners for Sacred Places.

 

In July, we applied to New York State for a Historic Preservation Grant. Because our church is in a zip code that is characterized by high poverty, if we get this grant it will be a 75/25 match (we pay 25%). We applied for the grant for clerestory window repair, since the criterion for the grant is urgency. Water infiltration caused part of the ceiling under these leaky windows to fall down, so we believe we have a good case that window repairs are urgent. The application was for about $120,000, and we will hear in January about whether or not we receive it. 

 

We also applied in May for a Congregational Development Grant from the Diocese. This grant can be used for our deficit, so it is very different from the historic preservation grants. If we get it, we are eligible to be on a 5-year cycle of grant renewal, but it will be less each year as we work toward sustainability. To apply for the grant, the team worked on a plan of action to “develop” our congregation: communicating better about what we do to the community and other ways of growing our congregation. We applied for $35,000 and we will hear in September or October from the diocese if we get the grant.  They can say no, give the full amount we asked for, or give a lesser amount based on the total they have to allocate within the diocese.

 

It’s because of this final grant that Ruth, Deb, and Joe were required to attend the College for Congregational Development, to learn tools that will help us grow Christ Church both “inside,” in what we do to develop spiritual lives and fellowship in our church, and outside, in what we do to live out our mission and attract others to work with us on that mission.]


Vestry Minutes,  November 2017

 

Vestry Minutes November 21, 2017

 

1. UPDATES:

a. Nominating Committee. We have not received any “yesses” to our requests to parishioners. Deb has written a job description that can be used when telling people who are not familiar with what the Vestry does about the position.

 

b. Amsden Fund: Bishop Singh has recommended a seminarian for us to support with Amsden funds. She will be sending her spiritual autobiography.

 

c. Diocesan Convention report: Deb’s report has been published in the SONG. Hannah Sommers presented a stirring talk on “What does faith mean to you?” Deb is our current parish rep to convention, and encourages others to self-nominate as delegates next year.

 

2. REPORT FROM LIAISONS 

a. Peg Britt reported to Vestry on Outreach

 

RAIHN - Beatrice  Deshommes

• Thanks to CC members who showed support for RAIHN’s  biggestfundraiser event  “CAR CITY”.

• RAIHN is always looking in need of volunteers

• Bea is arranging for CC and Two Saints to meet to create networking opportunities, hoping for once or twice per year

 

JAZZ FESTIVAL,  SCHOOL #9 - Vicki McCutchon

• Vicki strategized with Ruth to discuss how to get better participation with requests for items for Meal and More Christmas bags, as well as for the ongoing food collections for both M&M and the Pittsford Food Cupboard.

• 2017 was a successful year with 10 weddings.  There are 8 weddings set so far for 2018, and at this time there are 6 paid for and 1 tentative wedding date.

• CC is not as involved with school #9 as in years past.  #9 is happy to report that lots of churches are helping the school out at this time.  We do contribute fall school bags along with CC Pittsford, and Vicki touches base with CC Pittsford a few times a year to see if #9 is in need of any items or reading tutors.

ANGEL TREES - Eleanor Peet

• CC will be doing the Angel Trees again this year for 2 weeks in Dec.

b. Report from Communications: The communications committee has been meeting and working on improvements for FB and other communication venues.

3. PROPERTY UPDATES

• Val reported on the lighting meeting with Illuminfx. The meeting was attended by Alan Jones, John Fields, Stephen Kennedy, Kyle, and Val. Illuminfx will send ideas so we can talk more. Val will send them an e-mail stressing urgent need for a ball park figure. Finding ways to light beauty which we cannot see was discussed, as were types of bulbs, replacement timing, burning out problems, and how to obtain a lift to reach them were discussed tonight. Kyle will look into lift options.

• Also discussed was the walk through which John Fields had with persons involved with community development, on the day before the vestry meeting. Kyle will seek a report on what happened.

4. CAPITAL CAMPAIGN UPDATE: Work “behind the scenes” continues, currently with materials being drafted for various audiences. Joe made a motion for the vestry approve a $20,000 budget request to cover consultant/ copy/printing/collateral materials. Carolyn seconded. The motion passed, unanimously. 

Ruth is drafting a campaign prayer.

5. VESTRY ON CALL: There have been comments on the length of the Sunday service. A longer service pushes back coffee hour, which then affects Meal and More. Efficient and friendly sharing of space is the goal. 

Also, improvements to the bulletin were discussed. Carolyn and Kristy Liddell will champion this cause. 

6. RECTOR’S TIME: Ruth spoke of a number of newcomers. Their varied interests spotlight the wide variety of spiritual expressions which make Christ Church so vibrant. 

Lucie offered the closing prayer. Congratulations to Jim Kurmis, who had just become a Great Uncle. He is bringing cookies to the December meeting. Now, that’s an action item.

Respectfully submitted, Dec. 4. 2017 by David C. Jutsum.

 

 

Pentecost and All Saints 2017

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 Christ Church, please welcome our NEWEST sub-deacon, Jim Blake, and our NEWEST acolyte, Monesty Howard.  Thanks to Jim and Monesty for answering the Appeal for Altar Crew volunteers!

Christ Church, please welcome our NEWEST sub-deacon, Jim Blake, and our NEWEST acolyte, Monesty Howard.

Thanks to Jim and Monesty for answering the Appeal for Altar Crew volunteers!

For all the saints, who from their labors rest,
who thee by faith before the world confessed,
thy Name, O Jesus, be forever blessed.
Alleluia, Alleluia!

Thou wast their rock, their fortress and their might;
thou, Lord, their Captain in the well-fought fight;
thou, in the darkness drear, the one true Light.
Alleluia, Alleluia!

 O may thy soldiers, faithful, true, and bold, fight as the saints who nobly fought of old, and win with them, the victors crown of gold.
Alleluia, Alleluia!

O blest communion, fellowship divine!
We feebly struggle, they in glory shine
yet all are one in thee, for all are thine.
Alleluia, Alleluia!

And when the strife is fierce, the warfare long,
steals on the ear the distant triumph song,
and hearts are brave, again, and arms are strong.
Alleluia, Alleluia!

The golden evening brightens in the west;
soon, soon to faithful warriors cometh rest;
sweet is the calm of paradise the blest.
Alleluia, Alleluia!

But lo! there breaks a yet more glorious day;
the saints triumphant rise in bright array;
the King of glory passes on his way.
Alleluia, Alleluia!

From earth's wide bounds, from ocean's farthest coast,
through gates of pearl streams in the countless host,
singing to Father, Son, and Holy Ghost:
Alleluia, Alleluia! 

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Editor note: Members of our Stewardship team have been sharing heartfelt thoughts regarding Christ Church, and this seems a great place to highlight them. We have Joe Schaller, Pru Kirkpatrick, Steve Remy, and John and Kathy D'Amanda. 

 

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Because I believe in the grace of God, and all that it implies in my present life, and a life hereafter, it is my only reasonable response to be grateful for God’s grace. Gratitude is an action word. It’s not a slogan, not something that merely receives an occasional nod and a few words of thank you Lord for what you have given me. Gratitude is a call to action. And like many things spiritual, meaning God centered, it’s a call to taking inconvenient actions. Actions which rub against my nature for a life free of responsibilities. It’s a call to leave my own personal garden of Eden.

It is my experience that the strength of our church body, is that it nourishes my soul.  And it is only through this nourishment that I can transform my reluctance, my hesitation, and my proclivity to whine into a service rendered with a grateful and cheerful heart. It is the power of love in our Eucharist that is gifted to me, not in isolation, but as given to all. 

I believe that all God-centered spiritual activity plays out in our physical reality. Faith is found in community and as a community we have chosen to meet and worship here for more than 100 years. We believe it is God’s call on our lives. We believe that we have a legacy which God would have us to continue to refine and improve and to carry out with gratitude for his grace. 

Christ Church has also is given me a connection to a community of believers so that I may stand with a light in my hand in a world of great darkness. The Holy Spirit has lit the candle, but so have you.  Christ Church has given me a profound spiritually-based liturgy. It has given me the loving and powerful word of the good news of the gospel: exclaimed from our pulpit by a minister dedicated to the betterment of all, including our community both near and far. It is given me a soaring and majestic music which tells me that we can aspire to be what God has called us to do.  

By making a commitment to our annual stewardship program I am linking up my hands, with you in Christ.  I give secure in the knowledge that I have answered the call of God in my life. I stand here this morning because I have received, from God and through you, the courage to take the halting and inconvenient and maybe in some cases dangerous steps that that call of God’s will as expressed in this body requires of me. I give to the best of my ability. I give my talent, my time, my treasure. I give to give. I do not give to get. I am redeemed whether I give or not. That is a great joy! Giving is an expression of my gratitude for that great joy and for your steadfast and holy fellowship. Giving is an action word!

Joseph Schaller

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We are standing on the shoulders of giants. I am reminded of this when I enter our building at the Lawn Street entrance and walk past the portraits of the clergy, past and present, or when I read the "In memory of..." plaques in the sanctuary. These persons, working with generations of devoted parishioners, managed to ensure that Christ Church survived and thrived the many vicissitudes of the past 160 years. Now we find ourselves uniquely positioned to be Christ's light in our world. We have been given enough. In the of my favorite Offertory Sentence, "All things come of thee, O Lord, and of thine own have we given thee."

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                                                                                                    -- Sonja Shelton

 Hannah Sommers ©2011  watercolor

Hannah Sommers ©2011  watercolor

Ruth's column

 

“O blest communion, fellowship divine!

We feebly struggle, they in glory shine;

Yet all are one in thee in thee,

For all are thine.

Alleluia, alleluia!”

 

  • Hymn #287, “For all the saints, who from their labors rest”

 

As many of you know, I fully engage in that hallmark of our Anglican identity, which is openness to ambiguity! My faith is as much about the love of questions as the certainties. When it comes to All Saints Day, I am blessed with certainty.  For as long as I can remember, it has never occurred to me that the people I love who have died don’t hear me when I pray for them.  In fact, before I was taught anything different, I used to pray TO my grandmother. She was the first person I loved and lost. We called her “Angel.” 

For a time after Angel died, she became a regular fixture in my bed time prayer routine. After the Lord’s Prayer, I would give my attention to Angel. I went through God, of course.  I asked God to quiet the streets of heaven so that a message could get through and be heard by my grandmother. It never occurred to me that God didn’t quiet everyone in Heaven briefly to sound my message through the streets by broadcasting my own voice saying the words to Him: “Hi, Angel, it’s Ruth. How are you doing? I am doing fine. I miss you. I love you.”

All of these years later, it still does not occur to me that the ones I love and see no longer do not receive my prayers and join me there. It never occurs to me that we have not been knit together into one communion and fellowship in the mystical body of Christ.

I no longer picture cobbled, Heavenly streets with people bustling about but pausing when prayers and other announcements are given over the celestial intercom. When I am in that space where wordless, contemplative prayer delivers me, I am one with the God who is all in all. All who came before, all who are now, all who will come after; all of time, before time, and beyond time; all of what we can see, know, or believe and all of what we can’t see, know or believe.  The mystics call this “unitive seeing,” but it’s not reserved for mystics only. In this seeing, or “space,” I know beyond any doubt that I am communing with God in whom we live, move and have our being, and communing with all being that lives, moves, and has itself in God! 

Baptisms, Eucharists, music, prayer, liturgies – these guide us to the crossroads, the touch stone,  of the Saints in Heaven and on Earth. But Heaven and earth are also joined together within us when we give ourselves fully over to the presence of God. I no longer envision a veil between Heaven and earth that is temporarily lifted from time to time. I imagine that the great cloud of witnesses surrounding us is as near and present as Lawn Street is outside my office window. As are the saints of God, the souls of our loved ones died to this life, we ourselves and every other living thing that fills the overflowing cup who is God.

See you in church,

Ruth+

 

Did you know that Ruth has a blog? It's beautiful and you can find it here-

https://christchurchrochester.tumblr.com/

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Notes from Stephen Kennedy

We celebrated All Saints at Christ Church at the Sunday Eucharist with two anthems from the 20th century. "Give Laud Unto the Lord" by Ernest Bullock (1890-1979), and "How Beauteous Are Their Feet", by Charles Villiers Stanford (1852-1924).  These sacred choral anthems are staples in the Anglican repertoire.  Their texts, outlined below, are rich in imagery of All Saints.  Sacred choral works such as these were not performable at Christ Church until the advent of the Hook & Hastings organ.  We are grateful for our collaboration withe the Eastman School of Music which has brought about the possibility of expanding our repertoire to include such works.

"Give Laud Unto the Lord"                            
Text: Give Laud Unto the Lord, from heaven that is so high. Praise him in deed and word, above the starry sky: an also ye his Angels, all, armies royal, praise joyfully. Ye boundless realms of joy, exalt your maker’s fame, his praise your song employ.  Ye Cherubim and Seraphim, to sing his praise.

"How Beauteous Are Their Feet" 
Text: How beauteous are their feet
who stand on Zion's hill
who bring salvation on their tongues
and words of peace instil! How happy are our ears
that hear this joyful sound
which kings and prophets waited for
and sought, but never found. How blessèd are our eyes
that see this heavenly light
Prophets and kings desired it long
but died without the sight. The Lord makes bare his arm
through all the earth abroad
let every nation now behold
their Savior and their God.


Stephen Kennedy
Music Director
Christ Church Rochester
Instructor of Sacred Music
Eastman School of Music

 "Cobbs Hill"  Tim Jutsum©2006 acrylic on canvas

"Cobbs Hill"  Tim Jutsum©2006 acrylic on canvas

EVENTS

EVENTS and ANNOUNCEMENTS in This Issue

Upcoming Event Music Poster

      Latest Sunday Bulletin 

(when you click on an image below it will become full size and you can scroll through the pages)

Baptism on All Saints Sunday

Report on the Diocesan Convention 

Candlelight Concert Schedule 2017-2018

Old News, but Good News

Meet the new VanDelinder Fellows for 2017

Episcopal Relief and Development

The Care Team

Christ Church Open House

GRANTS UPDATE

Vestry Minutes

1 Crown him with many crowns,                                 2 Crown him the Son of God
the Lamb upon his throne;                                             before the worlds began,
Hark! how the heavenly anthem drowns                    and ye, who tread where he hath trod, 
all music but its own;                                                      crown him the Son of man;
awake, my soul, and sing of him                                  who every grief hath known
who died for thee,                                                           that wrings the human breast,
and hail him as thy matchless King                              and takes and bears them for his own,
through all eternity.                                                         that all in him may rest.

3 Crown him the Lord of life,                                      4 Crown him of lords the Lord, 
who triumphed over the grave,                                     who over all doth reign,
and rose victorious in the strife                                     who once on earth, the incarnate Word, 
for those he came to save;                                               for ransomed sinners slain,
his glories now we sing,                                                  now lives in realms of light, 
who died, and rose on high,                                           where saints with angels sing
who died, eternal life to bring,                                       their songs before him day and night, 
and lives that death may die.                                         their God, Redeemer, King.

5 Crown him the Lord of heaven,
enthroned in worlds above;
crown him the King,to whom is given, 
the wondrous name of Love.
Crown him with many crowns,
as thrones before him fall,
crown him, ye kings, with many crowns,
for he is King of all.

All Saints Sunday Johan Riley Blackman received the sacrament of Holy Baptism

We rejoice and welcome Johan into the family of God at Christ Church and congratulate his family.

Report on Diocesan Convention

Report on Diocesan Convention 2017

I had the pleasure of representing Christ Church at this year’s Diocesan Convention, which was held at RIT on October 28th. The convention passed two significant resolutions. 

 

The first was brought by Roja Singh and Dawn Gandell, “Against Caste-and Descent-Based Discrimination 2017.” Roja mentioned how a large majority (around 70%) of Christians in India are Dalits, or so-called “Untouchables.” The resolution asked that the Episcopal Diocese of New York “acknowledge the fundamental injustice of caste-and descent-based discrimination, a clear human rights violation; engage in legislative advocacy and education to raise awareness of the pervasive nature of this human rights violation; and that the Episcopal Diocese of New York charge the India Network with the preparation of an e-mail document outlining caste-and descent-based discrimination and the atrocities associated with it, such document to be distributed to all Diocesan parishes before the next Convention of the Episcopal Diocese of New York.”  The resolution passed and will be forwarded to the National Convention for their approval as well.

 

The second resolution was that the South Wedge Mission be entered into union with the Diocese of Rochester. The South Wedge Mission is a congregation supported jointly by the Lutheran Church and Episcopal Diocese of Rochester. It is accepted as a mission church, and “agrees to abide by and conform to all canonical and legal requirements of mission churches in union” with the Diocese of Rochester. You can find a wonderful description by Rev. Matthew Nickoloff of how the mission has grown and all their activities on the Diocesan website. 

http://www.episcopalrochester.org/sites/default/files/RESOLUTION%20B%20-%20South%20Wedge%20Mission-2.pdf

The Convention was livelier than in the past, in my opinion. In addition to the business of the day (approving the audit report, passing the budget, and electing people to Diocesan committees), the Diocese had ministry highlights from various congregations on videos produced by our new Communications Specialist Steve Richards. And there were some other informal but informational presentations, one presenting the work and objectives of an anti-racism group in Rochester, and one featuring Diocesan young people speaking about what faith means to them. All the kids were excellent speakers and had great things to say, and our own Hannah Sommers was the final speaker in the group.  She talked about her experiences in the church that help her say “I am not afraid for the future of the church” because she’s seen people act in faith outside church walls: she talked about her trip to Standing Rock and witnessing others going to court and advocating for refugees and migrants. She was so articulate and passionate, and she got a standing ovation!  And there were multiple moments of worship, prayer, and getting to know our table mates from all over the Diocese.

 

We will be looking for three delegates for next year’s convention. Please consider spending a fulfilling day in the company of Episcopalians from all over the Finger Lakes region of New York. It’s a wonderful opportunity!  --Deb VanderBilt


Candlelight Concerts, Compline, and Music Events

at Christ Church 2017-2018

Old News, but, Good News

This is some of the things that happened during the summer and in previous weeks. Some are things that you may have already seen and know about and others may be new to you. Seeing them as memories or for the first time reminds us of the many wonderful things that we shared. Cheers!

Pet Blessing

The Feast of St. Francis, October 4th, was the inspiration for the blessing of our pets as a part of the liturgy at the 11:00 on October 8th.

Goodbye, Marianne!

Jazz Fest

Report to the Rector, Wardens, and Vestry

2017 Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival

Made in the U.K. Series

 

Each year for nine days at the end of June, the East End becomes this Musical Oasis with thousands walking in the neighborhood enjoying all sorts of good music, good food and drink, and the kind of community spirit that makes a city a good place to be.  Since 2008, Christ Church has been a major part of this annual event known as The Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival, considered to be one of the top four in the USA.  We welcome 6,000 people through our doors for two performances each evening and our front lawn becomes a place for people to relax and enjoy music emanating from the free stages and other locations.  This year, A Meal & More held a successful earring sale on our front lawn to support their food ministry to this neighborhood all year long.  

 

Our participation in XRIJF began in 2008, and the first year we were designated the venue for Made in the UK was 2009.  Prior to that, the parish hosted a jazz-style mass as our neighborhood participation.  XRIJF is the largest public event at Christ Church each year.

 

The attendance figures for the 2017 XRIJF are as follows:

 

No other event draws this kind of attendance, and no other event involves nine straight days.  When we first got together with the Jazz Festival people, our intent was for this to be a major Public Relations/Community event.  Fund raising was not a part of the decision, but we were intent that it be “revenue neutral” or our out-of-pocket expenses be minimal.  Our current agreement calls for a $1,500 payment from the Festival for Moses’ extra time and paper supplies for the bathrooms.  The Festival pays Adamski Moving directly to move the piano and Mitch Moore from Eastman to tune the piano daily during the Festival.  Our out-of-pocket expenses are the cost of additional water and electricity.  This is approximately $50 for the water and less than $100 for the electricity.

 

We are staffed by a loyal crew of volunteers – about 5 each night – to usher, give out bottled water (which this year resulted in $400 of donations), and watch over the nave and hallways.  About 2/3 are parishioners.  We can say with absolute certainty that people regard Christ Church as one of the top venues and the most hospitable.  We know the British musicians feel this way, as we have received high praise in such publications as British Downbeat magazine and in what they say here and abroad.  Each night, we conduct several tours of interested people and after each performance we hear very kind words about the beauty of the church and how well we treat festival-goers.  Several of the ensembles are interviewed by the newspapers and television stations with flattering shots of our building, and committee members are likewise called upon for TV interviews.  We also give the opening announcements each evening at both shows and use this as an opportunity to invite people back to see us after the Festival.  Between XRIJF print and web material, the news media, and word on the street, the name “Christ Church” and its beauty is constantly in front of the community for nine days each June!

 

Our involvement as an XRIJF venue began at the same time the Craighead-Saunders Organ was being installed.  We believed that this unique organ would draw a great deal of local, national, and international attention to Christ Church.  Opening our doors to a major music festival would be yet another opportunity for the parish to showcase its building and its community to a large audience.  Our experience over the years has taught us that more people than we can imagine have a very positive image of Christ Church and its role in the Downtown Community, especially in the area of music and the fine arts.  We are limited only by our imagination to further exploit such opportunities.

 

Looking ahead to 2018 and beyond, we look for suggestions as to how we might improve our participation and also how to best work with things like potential repairs to the nave.

Respectfully submitted,

Joe and Vicki McCutchon, Carlos Mercado

Ad hoc Jazz Festival Committee

 

Here is the link to an excellent documentary on Made in the UK: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=efcH47HYh0U


Meet Our VanDelinder Fellows for 2017-2018

More about the Roy E. VanDelinder, Jr. Fellowship Program at Christ Church Rochester.

Through the combined resources of Christ Church’s Liturgical Music Program and the Eastman School of Music’s Organ Department, this exciting program offers vocational training and practical application in liturgical music skills for Eastman organ students who are pursuing a career in liturgical music. Fellows will receive a scholarship for participating in this program, and a large cash prize is awarded each year to the Fellow who demonstrates the greatest diligence and achievement. Under the leadership of Music Director Stephen Kennedy, Fellows will receive training and experience in improvising, composing, arranging, hymn playing, anthem and motet accompaniment, chanting, conducting, and rehearsing choirs and instrumentalists as well as other components within a church music program. This program is made possible by a generous gift from the Roy E. VanDelinder, Jr. Fund of Rochester Area Community Foundation.

Fellowship in Liturgical Organ Studies

Fellows will be selected by the VanDelinder Committee.  This committee will base their decision on the student’s résumé, playing skills, and two letters of recommendation. Fellows will receive a scholarship of around $4,700 for the academic year.  This amount will be re-figured this year, so it may be slightly more than this amount.  Fellows may participate in this program for up to three years but the VanDelinder Committee makes the selection of Fellows each year.  

Prize in Liturgical Organ Skills

Each year, the VanDelinder Committee will select one acting Fellow to receive the Roy E. VanDelinder, Jr. Prize in Liturgical Organ Skills that includes a cash prize of $8,000 above the scholarship. This prize will be awarded to the VanDelinder Fellow that demonstrates the greatest diligence and achievement. The prizewinner will be expected to remain in active duty as Fellow for a negotiated number of Sundays beyond the school term.  Fellows who do not win the prize will be excused at the end of the school term. 

Past Winners of the Roy E. VanDelinder, Jr. Fund of Rochester Area Community Foundation Prize in Liturgical Organ Skills

Käthe Wright Kaufman in 2014

Käthe Wright Kaufman in 2015

Jeremy Jelinek in 2016

Madeleine Woodworth in 2017


Episcopal Relief and Development

How about some lovely farm animals as a gift this Christmas? Or maybe a nice micro loan? I have to admit that I've never put farm animals on my list of things to get. I'm actually not a fan of farm animals. I have, however, wished for a micro loan, back in the day when we were a younger family. The opportunity to be creative is something that is so close sometimes, yet just out of reach for some of us. This is particularly true if you live in a place where food security is more hope than reality. A lot of people live in that place. It's not always just about location. Helping people make their hopes of opportunity come true this Christmas may be the very thing God is asking you to do. If you are inclined to want to make this a farm animal Christmas for someone who has this at the top of their wish list, check this out- http://www.episcopalrelief.org


The Care Team

is here to help

 

The Christ Church Care Team is a volunteer ministry to help parishioners on a temporary basis as they recover from surgery, suffer the death of a loved one, are home bound or in the hospital, or need support due to another kind of loss or difficult transition. The Care Team assists parishioners in need with the following: shopping, meals, pet care, house help, phone calls to check in, and home and hospital visits. Please notify the Rector if you or someone you know could use Care Team support. [Care Team Leaders: Shirley Ricker, Norma Kurmis, Lydia Worboys, Peg Britt, Elizabeth Dugdale, Kyle Liddell and Jim Blake]


Christ Church Open House- Sacred Sites

Dear Christ Church,

Thank you to all who made our Stained Glass open house a big success!  We had about 70 visitors, including a group of 40 on a group tour led by Pike Studios, and they were unbelievably enthusiastic--asked a million questions, took a million pictures--in fact, the tour guide couldn't get them out of there and on to their next venue!

 

The volunteers made this open house possible. They were welcoming and generous hosts.  I've attached 2 pictures--one which Vicki McCutchon entered into the Sacred Sites Photo Contest after the weekend, and one which shows the beautiful way Carlos set up the front of the church.

 

Huge kudos and thanks to all who helped.

Deb VanderBilt

Warden

Grants Update

 

The grant-writing team (Deb VanderBilt, Tom Foster, Meg Mackey, Peg Britt, and Hugh Kierig) has finished this year’s round of applications. In general, grants are available in the historic preservation category; in other words, we have to specify a building project and the grant will go toward repairs. Here’s an update on where we are with our grants.

 

In January, we applied for a grant from Sacred Sites (a part of the New York Conservancy Trust) for $50,000 for our buckling wall on Lawn Street. We received $25,000, which the grant administrator told us is typically the upper limit of what they award. We must match that grant 50-50 (no problem, since the wall repairs will cost at least $130K).

 

In May, we applied for two grants for the wall as well: to the Rochester Community Foundation Grant for $25,000 and to the Partners for Sacred Places for an unspecified amount (the first step is a “letter of intent”). We should hear from RCF in October, and we already heard we did not make the first cut from Partners for Sacred Places.

 

In July, we applied to New York State for a Historic Preservation Grant. Because our church is in a zip code that is characterized by high poverty, if we get this grant it will be a 75/25 match (we pay 25%). We applied for the grant for clerestory window repair, since the criterion for the grant is urgency. Water infiltration caused part of the ceiling under these leaky windows to fall down, so we believe we have a good case that window repairs are urgent. The application was for about $120,000, and we will hear in January about whether or not we receive it. 

 

We also applied in May for a Congregational Development Grant from the Diocese. This grant can be used for our deficit, so it is very different from the historic preservation grants. If we get it, we are eligible to be on a 5-year cycle of grant renewal, but it will be less each year as we work toward sustainability. To apply for the grant, the team worked on a plan of action to “develop” our congregation: communicating better about what we do to the community and other ways of growing our congregation. We applied for $35,000 and we will hear in September or October from the diocese if we get the grant.  They can say no, give the full amount we asked for, or give a lesser amount based on the total they have to allocate within the diocese.

 

It’s because of this final grant that Ruth, Deb, and Joe were required to attend the College for Congregational Development, to learn tools that will help us grow Christ Church both “inside,” in what we do to develop spiritual lives and fellowship in our church, and outside, in what we do to live out our mission and attract others to work with us on that mission.

 

It’s also in connection with the Diocesan grant that you took the survey about what attracted you to Christ Church and why you stay. Here are the results of that survey (except the comments, which even though anonymous we are treating as confidential:

 

Member Survey: 63 responses

 

Question 1: What caused you to visit Christ Church for a church service (other than Compline) the first time? (Click all that apply)

I was looking for a faith community 50.00% 26

Heard about it from someone I know 46.15% 24

Found it through the website 13.46% 7

Was in the neighborhood and was curious 13.46% 7

Attended Compline, then came to a service 7.69% 4

Read about it in the newspaper 1.92% 1

Found it via Facebook 1.92% 1 

Attended Jazz Festival then came to a service 0.00% 0

Question 2: What was it about Christ Church that caused you to attend regularly or become a member? (Click all that apply.)

The music 70.4% 43 

The preaching 63.9% 39 

The Christ Church community 59.0% 36 

The way the service is conducted (the liturgy) 57.3% 35

The physical space (Sanctuary) 47.5% 29

The outreach initiatives of Christ Church 34.4% 21

Question 3: If you had to pick a PRIMARY reason why you attend Christ Church regularly or are a member, what would you pick?

The music 26.6% 16 

The Christ Church community 26.6% 16 

The liturgy 20% 12 

The preaching 18.3% 11 

*Question 3 responses by those at CC 8 or fewer years: 

The preaching 31% 9 

The Christ Church community 24.1% 7 

The music 20.6% 6 

The liturgy 17.2% 5


Vestry Minutes,  October 2017

 

Vestry Minutes October 17, 2017

 

1. Report from Treasurer: Vestry welcome Norm Geil for his quarterly visit to the Vestry. He noted an end of month surplus in March and April. He is anticipating that Quickbooks will generate a statement of contributions, according to the expectations of the Quickbooks consultant working on our system. A third checking account has been opened for the Capital Campaign. The Vestry decided to hold an open budget meeting to promote transparency, along with a 15 minute tutorial on how to read budgets. The meeting will be Dec. 7.

 

2. Capital Campaign Committee Report by Joe Schaller

Committee members: Ruth Ferguson; Gale Lynch; Lucy Parfitt; Joe Schaller, Bill Soleim; John Urban; Deb Vanderbilt

A Gift & a Promise

Goal: $1,000,000

Contributions: $107,500

Pct. of Goal: 11%

 

• Mailing to the neighborhood: Sagamore, Gibbs/Selden St. neighborhood, Tower 280, and Manhattan Square Apartments. Approximately 100 pieces were mailed. Purpose of the mailing was to inform nearby residents of programs at Christ Church. Included in the mailing was a note from the Rector, a card listing programs and a Schola Cantorum CD. 

• Farash Foundation: A tour with the Executive Director will be scheduled. The foundation has previously made a grant to Christ Church and we will request a second grant.

Case statement – with capital projects

• Case statements for multiple audiences were previously completed, to be used in the solicitation of external organizations/individuals. 

• A State of Christ Church working draft is being reviewed.

• Capital projects were prioritized. Total cost of projects will equal the campaign goal of $1 million.

• A limited Conditions Report for our project areas from Bero is expected in the next 6 weeks. This is a very important step in presenting our case for support especially from the community, who know less about the state of our building.

Campaign Policies

• Completed policies were presented to the Vestry for approval

• Naming/Recognition policy being finalized

3. Deb moved that policies for the Capital Campaign donations be approved by the Vestry. Val seconded. Motion passed unanimously.  

4. Vestry Liaison Reports 

Reports from Vicki regarding special events, weddings, and meals:

 

• Right now Vicki has 5 weddings paid for in-full for 2018. The goal is 8 weddings for 2018, which would bring in $12,000 total. Vicki has overseen 7 weddings this year and one included a small reception.

• Vicki does not need further resources at this point, and reports that she loves working with Moses and Stephen, and is also happy to have Lydia as a backup as needed.

 

Report on Care Team—Ruth 

 

• The Care Team was split into different categories in July: Pet Care, Food Prep, Phone Calls, Home visits, Housekeeping, Hospital Visits

• Norma Kurmis took the lead on helping to organize volunteers for the food prep service. Meals have been brought to parishioners on a rotating basis since July. 

• The response from parishioners receiving meals has been mostly positive, with only a few hiccups in terms of communications.

 

Report on Foyers—Val 

Foyers has been on hiatus due to low turnout. Three parishioners signed up for the last round of foyers. We will advertise Foyers further in advance in 2018.

 

5. Rector’s time: A huge welcome to Pat Knapp, the new church secretary! Ruth is very excited to have her on board. 

n liturgy news, December 24th will be a full day at Christ Church. It is both Advent 4 AND Christmas Eve. There will be a 10 a.m. Advent 4 Eucharist; a 5:30 (said) Christmas Eve Eucharist and a 10:30 (sung) Eucharist. Also, Easter Vigil will be a joint venture this year with the clergy, choirs, and people of St. Thomas' and St. Paul's joining us. Rob Picken will sing the Exsultet, Leslie Burkhardt will preach, and Ruth will preside. The people of St. Thomas' and St. Paul's will share the lectern with us as readers, and members of both choirs will be invited to join the CC choir and the music performed under Stephen Kennedy's direction. The idea is that the Vigil, which has been shrinking in numbers for all three churches, will be a movable feast, and we will join St. Paul's next year and St. Thomas' the year after.

he last part of the meeting was given over to Evening Prayer. “Defend us from all dangers and mischiefs, and from the fear of them; that we may enjoy such refreshing sleep as may fit us for the duties of the coming day.”

 

Vestry Minutes September 2017

 

Vestry Minutes Tuesday, September 19, 201

1. Nominating Committee: Deb VanderBilt, Carolyn Mauro, and Meg Mackey will serve from Vestry, and Deb will recruit members from Parish. 

2. Worship Liaison report: Carolyn Mauro reported on needs of the groups for which she is liaison. 

• Altar Guild: Bill Soleim would like us to have one fair linen for each altar, totaling three. We currently have one. Ruth will suggest a fair linen for memorial gifts for those who inquire.

• More ushers would be helpful to the team. The teams are now two official ushers, with helpers to bring up the elements. Carolyn will consult with worship leaders again, after Advent and Christmas. 

3. Sponsorship Policy Proposal: The vestry passed a sponsorship policy proposal, for use of the church’s name in activities we want to sponsor officially. Any church member can request this, and we would ask them to follow the protocol (attached). 

4. Amsden Fund monies will be awarded to a seminarian, approximately $5,000. Ruth will work with the Bishop and the Diocesan Commission on Ministry on identifying a student with financial need.

5. Capital Campaign: Joe Schaller’s gave a report on the committee’s activies (which will be included in a handout to the parish). Deb reported that the outcome of vestry pledges was 100% participation. Combined number, including vestry pledges and two grants equals $107,450. If the vestry is representative of the entire parish (10 people pledging $65,450 = 100 people pledging $650,000), our goal of $1,000,000 is within reach!  

A new initiative coming out of Campaign discussions is the third Sunday Lecture Series beginning October 15, 8:15-8:45P.M. We will encourage people to attend, using every communication avenue we have!Ruth led the Vestry in a healing service in which each one had the opportunity for the laying on of hands in prayer, and anointing with oil.

The Spirit was moving, but the house was not shaken, which was a good thing, considering the Lawn St. wall and all. 

Vestry meetings as of October will begin at 7:00 P.M.

Respectfully submitted by David C. Jutsum, clerk of the vestry.

SPONSORSHIP GUIDELINES – Christ Church, Rochester NY

Passed by the Vestry on September 19, 2017

 

Purpose

Christ Church is committed to “justice and peace for all people,” according to our mission statement. The following policy outlines how Christ Church will proceed in sponsoring events or activities, including lending the name of Christ Church as an endorsing or sponsoring organization to another non-profit or its activities.

 

“Sponsorship” by Presence of Rector

The presence and voice of the Rector of Christ Church at events promoting social justice is within the individual rights of the Rector. This includes the Rector being associated with the church in media reports.

Sponsorship (in writing) of an Outside Organization by Proposal to the Vestry

Official sponsorship (in writing) of an event may be requested by any parishioner or the Rector. This might include co-sponsoring an event, providing rent-free space, placing an ad in a program, or hosting a fundraiser. If a special collection is part of the activity, the organization must be a 501(c)(3) organization.

A sponsorship proposal to the Vestry should be submitted to the Wardens and Rector:

• Briefly describe the activity, including date, time, location, and audience.

• State how the activity supports the Church’s mission.

• Estimate staff and/or volunteer time required, if any.

• Estimate the cost to the Church, if any.

• Indicate the duration of the sponsorship requested.

• Describe any potential for financial loss or other liability.

The Vestry will give priority to organizations whose mission is congruent with the Church’s mission. If approved, the sponsorship, when appropriate, should use wording that clarifies the sponsoring organization (“The Sanctuary Group” or “The Vestry”).

Other kinds of sponsorship

No advocacy or sponsorship of activities in support of political candidates or parties is allowed.

If sponsorship of an activity of an outside organization involves a contractual agreement, Vestry approval is required. Only the Rector is authorized to sign sponsorship contracts with outside organizations. 

 

Pentecost and Trinity 2017

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Prizes have been awarded to the VanDelinder Fellows for 2017

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More about the Roy E. VanDelinder, Jr. Fellowship Program at Christ Church Rochester.

Through the combined resources of Christ Church’s Liturgical Music Program and the Eastman School of Music’s Organ Department, this exciting program offers vocational training and practical application in liturgical music skills for Eastman organ students who are pursuing a career in liturgical music. Fellows will receive a scholarship for participating in this program, and a large cash prize is awarded each year to the Fellow who demonstrates the greatest diligence and achievement. Under the leadership of Music Director Stephen Kennedy, Fellows will receive training and experience in improvising, composing, arranging, hymn playing, anthem and motet accompaniment, chanting, conducting, and rehearsing choirs and instrumentalists as well as other components within a church music program. This program is made possible by a generous gift from the Roy E. VanDelinder, Jr. Fund of Rochester Area Community Foundation.

 

Fellowship in Liturgical Organ Studies

Fellows will be selected by the VanDelinder Committee.  This committee will base their decision on the student’s résumé, playing skills, and two letters of recommendation. Fellows will receive a scholarship of around $4,700 for the academic year.  This amount will be re-figured this year, so it may be slightly more than this amount.  Fellows may participate in this program for up to three years but the VanDelinder Committee makes the selection of Fellows each year.  

 

 

 

Prize in Liturgical Organ Skills

Each year, the VanDelinder Committee will select one acting Fellow to receive the Roy E. VanDelinder, Jr. Prize in Liturgical Organ Skills that includes a cash prize of $8,000 above the scholarship. This prize will be awarded to the VanDelinder Fellow that demonstrates the greatest diligence and achievement. The prizewinner will be expected to remain in active duty as Fellow for a negotiated number of Sundays beyond the school term.  Fellows who do not win the prize will be excused at the end of the school term. 

 

Past Winners of the Roy E. VanDelinder, Jr. Fund of Rochester Area Community Foundation Prize in Liturgical Organ Skills

 

Käthe Wright Kaufman in 2014

Käthe Wright Kaufman in 2015

Jeremy Jelinek in 2016

Madeleine Woodworth in 2017

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EVENTS

EVENTS and ANNOUNCEMENTS in This Issue

Candlelight Concert Schedule 2017-2018

Meet the new VanDelinder Fellows for 2017

The Care Team

Christ Church Open House

GRANTS UPDATE

Vestry Minutes

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Christ Church VanDelinder Fellows for the 2017-2018 season

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The Care Team

is here to help

 

The Christ Church Care Team is a volunteer ministry to help parishioners on a temporary basis as they recover from surgery, suffer the death of a loved one, are home bound or in the hospital, or need support due to another kind of loss or difficult transition. The Care Team assists parishioners in need with the following: shopping, meals, pet care, house help, phone calls to check in, and home and hospital visits. Please notify the Rector if you or someone you know could use Care Team support. [Care Team Leaders: Shirley Ricker, Norma Kurmis, Lydia Worboys, Peg Britt, Elizabeth Dugdale, Kyle Liddell and Jim Blake]

Christ Church Open House

Dear Christ Church,

Thank you to all who made our Stained Glass open house a big success!  We had about 70 visitors, including a group of 40 on a group tour led by Pike Studios, and they were unbelievably enthusiastic--asked a million questions, took a million pictures--in fact, the tour guide couldn't get them out of there and on to their next venue!

 

The volunteers made this open house possible. They were welcoming and generous hosts.  I've attached 2 pictures--one which Vicki McCutchon entered into the Sacred Sites Photo Contest after the weekend, and one which shows the beautiful way Carlos set up the front of the church.

 

Huge kudos and thanks to all who helped.

Deb VanderBilt

Warden

Grants Update

 

The grant-writing team (Deb VanderBilt, Tom Foster, Meg Mackey, Peg Britt, and Hugh Kierig) has finished this year’s round of applications. In general, grants are available in the historic preservation category; in other words, we have to specify a building project and the grant will go toward repairs. Here’s an update on where we are with our grants.

 

In January, we applied for a grant from Sacred Sites (a part of the New York Conservancy Trust) for $50,000 for our buckling wall on Lawn Street. We received $25,000, which the grant administrator told us is typically the upper limit of what they award. We must match that grant 50-50 (no problem, since the wall repairs will cost at least $130K).

 

In May, we applied for two grants for the wall as well: to the Rochester Community Foundation Grant for $25,000 and to the Partners for Sacred Places for an unspecified amount (the first step is a “letter of intent”). We should hear from RCF in October, and we already heard we did not make the first cut from Partners for Sacred Places.

 

In July, we applied to New York State for a Historic Preservation Grant. Because our church is in a zip code that is characterized by high poverty, if we get this grant it will be a 75/25 match (we pay 25%). We applied for the grant for clerestory window repair, since the criterion for the grant is urgency. Water infiltration caused part of the ceiling under these leaky windows to fall down, so we believe we have a good case that window repairs are urgent. The application was for about $120,000, and we will hear in January about whether or not we receive it. 

We also applied in May for a Congregational Development Grant from the Diocese. This grant can be used for our deficit, so it is very different from the historic preservation grants. If we get it, we are eligible to be on a 5-year cycle of grant renewal, but it will be less each year as we work toward sustainability. To apply for the grant, the team worked on a plan of action to “develop” our congregation: communicating better about what we do to the community and other ways of growing our congregation. We applied for $35,000 and we will hear in September or October from the diocese if we get the grant.  They can say no, give the full amount we asked for, or give a lesser amount based on the total they have to allocate within the diocese.

It’s because of this final grant that Ruth, Deb, and Joe were required to attend the College for Congregational Development, to learn tools that will help us grow Christ Church both “inside,” in what we do to develop spiritual lives and fellowship in our church, and outside, in what we do to live out our mission and attract others to work with us on that mission.

It’s also in connection with the Diocesan grant that you took the survey about what attracted you to Christ Church and why you stay. Here are the results of that survey (except the comments, which even though anonymous we are treating as confidential:

Member Survey: 63 responses

Question 1: What caused you to visit Christ Church for a church service (other than Compline) the first time? (Click all that apply)

I was looking for a faith community 50.00% 26

Heard about it from someone I know 46.15% 24

Found it through the website 13.46% 7

Was in the neighborhood and was curious 13.46% 7

Attended Compline, then came to a service 7.69% 4

Read about it in the newspaper 1.92% 1

Found it via Facebook 1.92% 1 

Attended Jazz Festival then came to a service 0.00% 0

Question 2: What was it about Christ Church that caused you to attend regularly or become a member? (Click all that apply.)

The music 70.4% 43 

The preaching 63.9% 39 

The Christ Church community 59.0% 36 

The way the service is conducted (the liturgy) 57.3% 35

The physical space (Sanctuary) 47.5% 29

The outreach initiatives of Christ Church 34.4% 21

Question 3: If you had to pick a PRIMARY reason why you attend Christ Church regularly or are a member, what would you pick?

The music 26.6% 16 

The Christ Church community 26.6% 16 

The liturgy 20% 12 

The preaching 18.3% 11 

*Question 3 responses by those at CC 8 or fewer years: 

The preaching 31% 9 

The Christ Church community 24.1% 7 

The music 20.6% 6 

The liturgy 17.2% 5

Vestry Minutes,  August 2017

1. Joe Schaller reported on the work of the CAPITAL CAMPAIGN committee.  The Vestry was asked to pledge early as a “leadership gift”—this amount will be announced to the congregation in September. We have a 25,000 matching grant to add to this total. There will be a public kick-off with an event early in 2018. Deb added that Deb, Joe, and Ruth had met with ESM CFO Michelle Gibson in August to talk about the campaign.

2. WORSHIP/FORMATION. Kyle reported a meeting was held Wednesday, August 9, in which a group of parishioners with varied spiritual interests were asked to help formulate ideas about CC activities with “spiritual drive and umph.” Ruth has asked several participants to process and plan based on feedback from that evening.

3. Report on the College for Congregational Development: Deb reported on a very busy and inspiring week for herself, Ruth, and Joe Schaller. The basic thrust was teaching tools proven to work, not trends; and organizational development: diagnosing issues, designing meetings, dealing with conflict. Often, this material was presented in the context of case studies (one goal: CC does not end up as one of their negative case studies). Each participant must plan and carry out one project related to Congregational Development. Deb will also share the reading list which the College assigned with the vestry, and put it in The Song.

4. PROPERTY DISCUSSIONDeb has been corresponding with Swiatek Studios. They can do windows and plaster restoration work at once. This is a way to cut the loss of organ time for ESM. Doing both at the same time will also mean the loss of only one year of weddings and Jazz Fest. Vestry recommends the work on the nave be done in 2020 so we can give ESM 3 years advance notice. Also, it will then take place in the third year of the capital campaign. We will still fix the Lawn St. wall in 2018, with no effect on ESM or other activities.

MOTION: The Vestry approves the date of Summer 2020 for both Nave plaster repair and painting and window repair. Motion passed.

5. YOUTH FELLOWSHIP STARTUP DISCUSSION.  Ruth presented an update for 2017-2018. Plans are afoot for various activities scheduled on a monthly basis, including a possible shared lock-in with St. Thomas’s. Food, fun, faith, and fellowship in different formats will be planned according to when participants can attend.

This was Gale Lynch’s last vestry meeting. She was commended for her many contributions to the life of the parish for 16 years. She and her family will be missed.

6. Ruth led a short service for the vestry, and Carolyn Mauro ended the meeting with a prayer, and the meeting adjourned.

Respectfully submitted,

Dave Jutsum, Clerk

Vestry Minutes July 18,2017

Highlights of Vestry Meeting July 18, 2017

1.       The vestry shared reflections on the vestry retreat of June. Ruth and the wardens are going to take these many comments and prioritize items from the action item brainstorming session.

2.       The vestry discussed the weekly schedule for use of the sanctuary. Communication is of the utmost importance; as new volunteers come on board committees, they need to be oriented to the policy of shared space.  ESM would prefer 2 weeks’ notice for interruption of their time. For events besides property repairs, notification means sending an email to David Higgs, with copies to Alice Meyer (Organ Department secretary), and to his teaching assistant and copying in Ruth and the CC office.

3.       The Property report was given by Kyle. He discussed Lawn St. wall repair, sealing of clerestory windows, and nave plaster repair. The timing of these events is in flux. There are many question for Swiatek, the company we have used in the past. Deb will write Brett Swiatek, copying Kyle, and in future Kyle will communicate with Swiatec, and keep John Fields, head of Property Commission, in the loop.

The recommendation of the Property and Finance committees is that Lawn St. wall work be done in summer 2018. Based on Swiatek’s time estimate and grant outcomes, the vestry expressed a preference for both window and nave work to be done in 2020. If they can’t be combined, then the recommendation is windows in 2019 and nave in 2020.

4.       Ruth, Deb, and Joe will be attending the week long College for Congregational Development. Thanks to them and to their families for sharing in this endeavor.

5.       Vestry on Call involved a question about the Capital Campaign, and where it is at. Joe will write a notice for the bulletin in August. A meeting with Michelle Gibson, CFO ESM, is planned for August 14. The Capital Campaign Committee will develop a message to the parish in the bulletin providing an update in September. Joe said Hugh Kierig is moving out of town. His help has been invaluable. Gale Lynch will also be sorely missed. She plans to continue to help from Manhattan. Lucie Parfitt and John Urban are joining the committee.

6.       Rector’s Report: Ruth was approached as to whether Christ Church would be interested in participating as a sponsor of the Witness Palestine Film Festival, to be held Sept. 15-Oct. 21.  She described it as a pro-peace film series: common thread, common humanity. She requested a vote on the following question: “Are you ok to support a film series which raises human rights abuses through the lens of Palestine?” After some discussion, a show of hands produced this result: 6 in favor; 4 abstaining. Next meeting the vestry will work on developing a sponsorship policy.

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Easter 2017

 Easter banner canvas and acrylic © Tim Jutsum 2005

Easter banner canvas and acrylic © Tim Jutsum 2005

CHRIST CHURCH                       EASTER 2017

Rochester, NY                 The SONG          vol. 2 issue  5

This Te Deum window is a Tiffany masterpiece!
Open House for Stained Glass Tours
Christ Church Rochester May 20-21
Tours Saturday 1-5, Sunday 1-4 and Organ Demonstration Saturday 4-5, Sunday 3-4. Parking in RGE Lot off Lawn Street!

 

SPECIAL EASTER PRESENT!

EASTER COMPLINE!


Schedule for Holy Week services at Christ Church Rochester 141 East Avenue Rochester New York

 

HOLY SATURDAY

GREAT VIGIL OF EASTER7:00 p.m.

 

EASTER DAY

Holy Eucharist 8:00a.m.

Solemn Choral Eucharist 11 a.m. 

 Sing, men and angels, sing,

For God our Life and King

Has given us light and spring

And morning breaking.

Now may man's soul arise

As kinsman to the skies,

And God unseals his eyes

To an awaking.

 

 Sing, creatures, sing; the dust

That lives by lure and lust

Is kindled my the thrust

Of life undying;

This hope our Master bare

Has made all fortunes fair,

And man can on and dare,

His death defying.

 

After the winter snows

A wind of healing blows,

And thorns put forth a rose

And lilies cheer us;

Life's everlasting spring

Hath robbed death of his sting,

Henceforth a cry can bring

Our Master near us.

 Rite of Spring

Rite of Spring

Editor note:

 

Alleluia! The Lord is risen! 

 

Last year, for the Easter issue of this publication, I wrote about my house because we were deep in the throes of planning to renovate the chancel. If you wonder how these fit together you can find the original article here- http://songforchristchurch.org/archive/ just scroll down until you get to Easter 2016. (There is a bit of scrolling to do because every issue is reposted there. It’s like taking a stroll, or in this case a scroll, down memory lane). A couple of months before this the north aisle ceiling had fallen and Ruth had gathered some bits, placed them in a jar, and done a very prophet-like thing. She had placed it on the altar and said, first to God, then to God’s people, “So, do your see this? Do you? Well, what are you going to do about it, huh?”  I may be paraphrasing a little. No matter. The thing got done. The ceiling got fixed. The scaffolding got put up and taken down, stuffing the entire chancel with hope for what could be, and now the chancel is more beautiful than it has ever been. The Narthex was renewed as well. 

 

We still have hopes. We hope things for our community here as lovers of God at Christ Church. We still have hopes for the ways we can bring beauty, power and peace to each other’s lives and the larger world around us. We hope to be able to give some more attention to the physical needs of the building, too. Do you have wishes and stories? You can use this publication. The SONG can change, literally, every few minutes. Anyone can send anything, songs, poems, memories, video, cartoons, prayers, longings, art, short works of fiction, anything you wish to reveal of yourself. It can be published. We will grow as friends.

 

 Speaking of friends, consider joining a FOYER group. Foyers are groups of three families, even families with only one person, that meet for a meal, one time per family. That’s three times total. The meal can be at the home of the host family or someplace else if the host chooses that. The group decides how they want to organize it. The idea is to have fun. Because…fun. The way to submit something and the way to join a FOYER is, believe it or not, the same. Click on the link here- https://songforchristchurch.org/contact/  and you will find two separate forms. The first one is to join a FOYER group, and the second one is to leave a comment or submit something for the SONG.

 

I hope you do.

 

Christ is risen indeed! Alleluia!

 

Val Jutsum

EASTER SUNDAY

2017

 

Mark writes that the two Mary’s, the mother of James and Salome, came to the tomb to anoint Jesus’ dead body with spices, anguishing over who might roll the stone away for them, only to find that it had already been rolled away.  A young man dressed in white robe was sitting by the tomb.  “Do not be alarmed.  You are looking for Jesus of Nazareth, who was crucified.  He has been raised.  He is not here.  Look there is the place they laid him.”

Luke tells us Joseph of Arimathea and a number of women who had followed arrive to anoint his body and, upon finding the stone rolled away and the empty tomb, there were two men who essentially asked them why they were looking for Jesus in a graveyard: “Why do you seek the living among the dead?  He is not here, but has risen.”  John writes that Mary Magdalene stood weeping where the stone had been rolled away, when two angels appear, “Woman, Why are you weeping?”  And Jesus himself asks her the same, although she doesn’t recognize him and believes him to be the gardener.  “Why are your weeping?” he asks, “Who are you looking for?”  And when he calls her by name, she rushes to embrace him, but, for the mystery of his resurrected substance, is told she cannot yet touch him.

Matthew tells us, however, that the two Mary’s arrive at the tomb but the stone is not rolled away.  The angel descends and rolls it away in front of their eyes.  Not to let Jesus out(he’s already out) but to let the witnesses in.  But in all four Gospels, the empty tomb is the first to announce the resurrection.  The announcement is made here, for an empty tomb is where the dark of the cave meets the light of day.  But the announcement does not change: he is not here, he has risen, why do you seek the living among the dead, why are you weeping, he has been raised.  This is the core announcement (it is not an explanation) He has been raised.  This is the proclamation (not explanation) that called into being a church around it.  Whatever we believe about the resurrection or physical resuscitation – the announcement gathers us in, Sunday after Sunday, and fills these pews ever fuller on the day we celebrate the it.  Easter Sunday.  He is raised.

Try as we might, we cannot explain, we cannot even elaborate on “he has been raised.”  We cannot contain its wildness, joy, and terror in our creeds and doctrines, we think we can elaborate on it in a seminary education but we can’t.  Our theologies and Christologies can never, in their impossible vocabulary words, reflect the original announcement at the tomb.  The stark and shining brevity of “he is raised” defies what we write or teach or elaborate or believe.  Those of us who don’t go in for organized religion have taken the announcement and spun it into poetry, and in some cases, have tapped into the mystery and danger of it, lending truth and beauty to the worship of the church.  But the older I get, the more wary I am of using art to express or fathom the announcement.  While some art exposes the darkness and beauty of these words, “he is raised” is not an interpretation.  Even our own worship does not fully comprehend the dark side of this announcement: the guards who shook like dead men, the ones who rushed to touch him but were turned away, the joy of his walking away from his grave, but the confusion and complexity of his refusal to stay.  “He is raised” must always attest to the emptiness of his earthly absence, and, more importantly, to the violence that is brought to bear on those who give voice to it: He is raised.

As guardian of the announcement, the Church must preserve it in all of it danger, beauty, and benediction.  We must preserve its weepingly beautiful of its joy on the breath of the angel at the tomb.  But we must also preserve it in all of it terror and fierceness, for the angels of God descend to many tombs.  I hear the voice of the angel who has descended to the rubble of Aleppo, and the angel who stands over the lifeless tomb of the child who has been gassed, and if the light of day meets the dark of this cave, it is not readily visible to us.  Hovering over the child’s corpse, I hear “he is raised,” but it is ravaged by the anger of God as he announces it to the dark powers and principalities of this world.  We must hear in the announcement that brings us to Easter the terrible justice that will be brought to crimes against humanity, the sounds of the storming the gate of hell to rescue all of us – especially the child who has been gassed – from the dark that would overcome us.  “He is not here.  He raised.”  If it is not about the Syrian child, if it is not meant for his [I don’t care, God doesn’t care if they’re Muslin], they I don’t know how to hear it.

If it’s all a metaphor, I don’t want anything to do with it.  Neither do the parents of children dead and dying from war and famine the world over.  I don’t want a religion that escapes reality, but religion that plunges into it.  We Episcopalians are enlightened and proud of our enlightenment; we are proud of our educated agnosticism, and our generosity toward the sentimental expressions of hymns and Easter lilies.  But does it ever occur to us that cynicism is as easy an answer to this as is sentimentality?  That cynicism, like sentimentality, lacks the imagination, the moral vision, lacks the stomach required to even consider “he is raised.”  Cynicism domesticates, domesticates the holy and horrific alike.  And it is of no use to those whose lives are too ravaged to celebrate Easter or any other religious holiday.  Perhaps the most authentic and courageous response to the Easter announcement is not to believe it – faith is never about what you believe, but what you know to be true – but to hold on to it as a light I the darkness.  Perhaps the most courageous response is to actually hear it and hold it in every fiber of our being “he is raised,” for ourselves, for the world, for those who cannot hear it, not because they’re cynical or they lack imagination, but because they and their are dying in streets of rubble.  And if you can’t properly say you know it to be true, then let the words burn in your heart as hope, a hope that consumes you: He is not here.  He has conquered death.  The light shone in the dark but the darkness could not over come it.  He is not here. He is raised.

Ruth+

Bonus

Ruth published an article in Metro Justice which is republished below-

 (Continued from page 1)  we all were: a blizzard of wind gusts up to fifty miles an hour with wind chills of twenty below. Those in the camps who needed to evacuate couldn’t get out. The rest of us couldn’t get in. Thankfully, there were no deaths. Stranded in the Ramada Inn in Bismarck, we witnessed firsthand how Bismarck is itself a “ground zero” of sorts, including our motel, for the descent of all manner of people and caus- es. We slept for two nights under the same roof as had veterans, people from native tribes the world over, big oil people and other corporatocracy, clergy, the media, the military, advocates for Native Amer- icans and environmentalists, and even under cover security, one of whom said to me and my colleague as we waited out the blizzard: “It’s the liberal eco-terrorists we have to fear the most.” Somehow, my col- league (wearing his clergy collar) found it in himself to laugh: “Then I guess you’re talking to some liberal eco-terrorists!”  The road into Standing Rock was clear by Wednesday morning, though littered with cars abandoned in snow drifts and ditches. Father Floberg drove us to visit Oceti Sakowin, stopping along the way to unload his winch and command all our man power to help a driver get his SUV out of a ditch. Upon our arrival, we hauled the precious firewood Father Floberg had stashed to a medical tent, had our picture taken by the flag of the Episcopal Church that the Sioux erected alongside the flags of the many nations, and sat quietly by the sacred fires. A native woman stirring pots of hot tea smiled when I asked her if she held any hope in Obama’s denial of easement, and simply said, “No.” Nonetheless, Dave  Archambault and the Cannon Ball Tribal District, with the support of the entire tribal council, asked that the camps close and the protectors go home. We pulled away from Oceti Sakowin December 7th with the blessings of Dave Archambault and a new charge: return to your homes and ask yourselves, “whose land am I living on? How can I protect its water and its air? How can I be in relationship with the ones whose land I am on?” We pulled away with renewed hope.  That was then.  Today, as our new president com- mands expediency for the easement of the Dakota Access Pipeline and its snaking through the land of the Sioux (their sa- cred burial grounds, their drinking water), there are yet again eyewitness accounts of deadly police brutality against unarmed protectors. Convoys of construction vehi- cles and armed military have descended on Standing Rock in full force. Thankful- ly, so have the UN Committee on Trans- national Corporations and Human Rights  Abuses, the International Indian Treaty Council, and the Water Protector Legal Collective. Yet again, a call has gone out to veterans to return to protect the protectors at Standing Rock. Yet again, a call has gone out to interfaith leaders to speak and act against the government’s repression. Yet again, a call has gone out to all of us to resist these crimes against humanity and the earth.  But it is not so simple. So many of us, including those in the Lakota and Dakota nations, are divided as to where the fight is and whether the multitudes should return to Standing Rock, but this is only to be expected. Any resistance movement must always confront its own internal divisions, even as it confronts the external powers that would repress it. We who consider ourselves activists must also commit not only our external efforts to the cause, but commit our internal work as well: we must do some very deep soul searching and self-examination so that we can join whatever the movement with unwavering consciences yet open minds. Having done this work, we can accept and embrace that some of us will return to Standing Rock in the same spirit of sol- idarity that will keep some of us at home.  Having been to Standing Rock and having conversed with natives of differing opinions about how people like me can be supportive, I know this much: the work at Standing Rock is the work we must do across the country and the globe. We must ask ourselves: whose land are we on here in upstate New York? How can we build relationships with those from whom we stole it? How can we work with them to protect it? And how can we stand in solidarity with THEM? How can we as  Americans join with Native Americans to stand up to our own government, whose repression of self-determined peoples in other countries has now been unleashed upon its own citizens? And, as a religious leader, I cannot help but ask: how can we join the resistance in the steadfast spirit of prayer and non-violence of the Standing Rock Sioux, and keep the sacred fire lit in our hearts and spirituality? ■

(Continued from page 1)

we all were: a blizzard of wind gusts up to fifty miles an hour with wind chills of twenty below. Those in the camps who needed to evacuate couldn’t get out. The rest of us couldn’t get in. Thankfully, there were no deaths. Stranded in the Ramada Inn in Bismarck, we witnessed firsthand how Bismarck is itself a “ground zero” of sorts, including our motel, for the descent of all manner of people and caus- es. We slept for two nights under the same roof as had veterans, people from native tribes the world over, big oil people and other corporatocracy, clergy, the media, the military, advocates for Native Amer- icans and environmentalists, and even under cover security, one of whom said to me and my colleague as we waited out the blizzard: “It’s the liberal eco-terrorists we have to fear the most.” Somehow, my col- league (wearing his clergy collar) found it in himself to laugh: “Then I guess you’re talking to some liberal eco-terrorists!”

The road into Standing Rock was clear by Wednesday morning, though littered with cars abandoned in snow drifts and ditches. Father Floberg drove us to visit Oceti Sakowin, stopping along the way
to unload his winch and command all
our man power to help a driver get his SUV out of a ditch. Upon our arrival,
we hauled the precious firewood Father Floberg had stashed to a medical tent, had our picture taken by the flag of the Episcopal Church that the Sioux erected alongside the flags of the many nations, and sat quietly by the sacred fires. A native woman stirring pots of hot tea smiled when I asked her if she held any hope in Obama’s denial of easement, and simply said, “No.” Nonetheless, Dave

Archambault and the Cannon Ball Tribal District, with the support of the entire tribal council, asked that the camps close and the protectors go home. We pulled away from Oceti Sakowin December 7th with the blessings of Dave Archambault and a new charge: return to your homes and ask yourselves, “whose land am I living on? How can I protect its water and its air? How can I be in relationship with the ones whose land I am on?” We pulled away with renewed hope.

That was then.

Today, as our new president com- mands expediency for the easement of the Dakota Access Pipeline and its snaking through the land of the Sioux (their sa- cred burial grounds, their drinking water), there are yet again eyewitness accounts of deadly police brutality against unarmed protectors. Convoys of construction vehi- cles and armed military have descended on Standing Rock in full force. Thankful- ly, so have the UN Committee on Trans- national Corporations and Human Rights

Abuses, the International Indian Treaty Council, and the Water Protector Legal Collective. Yet again, a call has gone
out to veterans to return to protect the protectors at Standing Rock. Yet again, a call has gone out to interfaith leaders to speak and act against the government’s repression. Yet again, a call has gone out to all of us to resist these crimes against humanity and the earth.

But it is not so simple. So many of
us, including those in the Lakota and Dakota nations, are divided as to where the fight is and whether the multitudes should return to Standing Rock, but this is only to be expected. Any resistance movement must always confront its own internal divisions, even as it confronts the external powers that would repress it. We who consider ourselves activists must also commit not only our external efforts to the cause, but commit our internal work as well: we must do some very deep soul searching and self-examination so that
we can join whatever the movement with unwavering consciences yet open minds. Having done this work, we can accept and embrace that some of us will return to Standing Rock in the same spirit of sol- idarity that will keep some of us at home.

Having been to Standing Rock and having conversed with natives of differing opinions about how people like me can be supportive, I know this much: the work
at Standing Rock is the work we must
do across the country and the globe. We must ask ourselves: whose land are we on here in upstate New York? How can we build relationships with those from whom we stole it? How can we work with them to protect it? And how can we stand in solidarity with THEM? How can we as

Americans join with Native Americans to stand up to our own government, whose repression of self-determined peoples in other countries has now been unleashed upon its own citizens? And, as a religious leader, I cannot help but ask: how can we join the resistance in the steadfast spirit of prayer and non-violence of the Standing Rock Sioux, and keep the sacred fire lit in our hearts and spirituality? ■

 

 

Prizes have been awarded to the VanDelinder Fellows for 2017

Madeleine Woodworth, winner of the the Roy E. VanDelinder, Jr. Prize in Liturgical Organ Skills. This prize is awarded to the VanDelinder Fellow that demonstrates the greatest diligence and achievement in the program. 

I’m thrilled to be serving as one of this year’s three VanDelinder Fellows. In the fall of 2014, I came to Eastman to study organ with Nathan Laube, and I was fortunate enough to join Schola Cantorum as a freshman. Working under the direction of Stephen Kennedy inspired me to participate as a choir member at Christ Church starting in February 2015. I grew up singing in choirs at Grace Episcopal Church in Oak Park, IL, so my passion for singing and conducting has been well nourished from an early age. Watching everyone work together here, I’ve truly fallen in love with what this music program has to offer. I’m constantly realizing the profound joys of sacred music and hope that this path makes itself present in my future. Sacred music brings so much spiritual balance and peace to my life, and the quality of musicianship at Christ Church continually serves to nurture my soul. I’m so grateful for this unique opportunity, and I look forward to serving this community in what I know will be a wonderful year.

Alden Wright, awarded the Casparini Prize for the best hymn playing

I am honored to serve as a VanDelinder Fellow in your parish!  I am a freshman here at Eastman, where I study with Nathan Laube.  I am a native of Salisbury, NC and I am truly excited to be living in Rochester.  In Salisbury, I served as music director and organist at Milford Hills United Methodist Church from January 2015 – June 2016.  Now, of course, I will continue my experience in church music in your parish.  Though only a freshman, I have visited your sanctuary on several occasions, the first being during last summer’s High School Organ Week, a program of the ‘Summerat Eastman’ series.  I will always remember the day that I first heard the two fabulous instruments at Christ Church.  I did not imagine at the time that I would have the opportunity in my first year to serve the parish on those instruments and study with your wonderful music director, Stephen Kennedy.  I am truly looking forward to serving God and this parish while furthering my knowledge of the timeless liturgy of the Church.  

Jiaqi Shao, awarded the Hook and Hastings Prize for the greatest advancement in liturgical music skills

I am a sophomore pursuing my BM in Organ Performance in the studio of Professor David Higgs at Eastman School of Music. I was born in 1997 in Shanghai, China, and began studying piano at the age of four. As a pianist, I won the second prize in the 16th Annual Music Open Competition in the United States (2008). I studied in the Music Middle School (affiliated with the Shanghai Conservatory of Music) from 2009-2015. I have studied organ since 2011, and was the winner of the teenage group in the Second International Electronic Organ Competition in Beijing, China in 2011. Now being an organ student at Eastman School of Music, I performed in “Pipedreams Organ Concerts” in Rochester this April and played in student improvisation concerts at Christ Church. I sang in Christ Church Choir last year and am very much looking forward to being with you as a VanDelinder Fellow this year. 

More about the Roy E. VanDelinder, Jr. Fellowship Program at Christ Church Rochester.

Through the combined resources of Christ Church’s Liturgical Music Program and the Eastman School of Music’s Organ Department, this exciting program offers vocational training and practical application in liturgical music skills for Eastman organ students who are pursuing a career in liturgical music. Fellows will receive a scholarship for participating in this program, and a large cash prize is awarded each year to the Fellow who demonstrates the greatest diligence and achievement. Under the leadership of Music Director Stephen Kennedy, Fellows will receive training and experience in improvising, composing, arranging, hymn playing, anthem and motet accompaniment, chanting, conducting, and rehearsing choirs and instrumentalists as well as other components within a church music program. This program is made possible by a generous gift from the Roy E. VanDelinder, Jr. Fund of Rochester Area Community Foundation.

Fellowship in Liturgical Organ Studies

Fellows will be selected by the VanDelinder Committee.  This committee will base their decision on the student’s résumé, playing skills, and two letters of recommendation. Fellows will receive a scholarship of around $4,700 for the academic year.  This amount will be re-figured this year, so it may be slightly more than this amount.  Fellows may participate in this program for up to three years but the VanDelinder Committee makes the selection of Fellows each year. 

 

Prize in Liturgical Organ Skills

Each year, the VanDelinder Committee will select one acting Fellow to receive the Roy E. VanDelinder, Jr. Prize in Liturgical Organ Skills that includes a cash prize of $8,000 above the scholarship. This prize will be awarded to the VanDelinder Fellow that demonstrates the greatest diligence and achievement. The prizewinner will be expected to remain in active duty as Fellow for a negotiated number of Sundays beyond the school term.  Fellows who do not win the prize will be excused at the end of the school term. 

Past Winners of the Roy E. VanDelinder, Jr. Fund of Rochester Area Community Foundation Prize in Liturgical Organ Skills

Käthe Wright Kaufman: Winner in 2014 

Käthe Wright Kaufman: Winner in 2015 

Jeremy Jelinek: Winner in 2016


Christ Church Music Notes From Stephen Kennedy

Christ Church celebrates Easter with Renaissance masterworks such as Surrexit Christus Hodie by Samuel Scheidt (1587-1654), Jubilate Deo by John Ireland (1879-1962), and indigenous works to our parish composed by Music Director Stephen Kennedy, Scott Perkins and Marc Laroussini. Both Scott and Marc participated in our parish’s liturgical music-training program. We are a parish who lives and affirms a mission of transforming people’s lives through music. Happy Easter everyone!

 

Surrexit Christus Hodie (translation)

Christ is risen today Alleluia!

For the comfort of all people. Alleluia!

Rejoice in this Easter Day. Alleluia!

Let us give thanks to God. Alleluia!

He suffered death the day before. Alleluia!

He suffered for us all. Alleluia!

Praise the Holy Trinity. Alleluia!

Give thanks to God. Alleluia!

 

Jubilate Deo (translation)

O be joyful in the Lord, all ye lands:

serve the Lord with gladness, and come before his presence with a song.

Be ye sure that the Lord he is God;

it is he that hath made us, and not we ourselves;

we are his people, and the sheep of his pasture.

O go your way into his gates with thanksgiving, and into his courts with praise;

be thankful unto him, and speak good of his Name.

For the Lord is gracious, his mercy is everlasting;

and his truth endureth from generation to generation.

 

Stephen Kennedy

Music Director

Christ Church Rochester

Instructor of Sacred Music

Eastman School of Music

The above recordings were made by me on an iphone during the service. It is kind of like a family thing with a home movie quality. We are family. I'm sure you'll enjoy this. And, for all of the people who visit this website but can not come to Christ Church because of situation, I hope this makes you feel more connected to us. For all who have not yet come to Christ Church I hope that you visit us soon because even in this rough state you can experience the awesomeness. This is our weekly experience of worship.  ed. note

EVENTS and ANNOUNCEMENTS in This Issue

The Bishop's Visit

Foyers Groups

Driving through the Fog

Sanctuary at Christ Church -

Voices From Exile, No One Left Behind, and The Giving Board

 


Bishop Singh visit and Confirmation

 Just click on this link-   http://songforchristchurch.org/contact/

Just click on this link- http://songforchristchurch.org/contact/

Driving through the fog May 7th, after church, lunch provided

Ever driven through the fog, headlights on, but still you can only see a few feet ahead of you?  This is what climate action can feel like.  But, did you still make it to your destination despite the fog?  Well, we can solve the climate crisis too.  Local organizations are advocating for changes at the community level and at the federal level.  Ever wondered about those oil tank cars?  Want renewable energy to be less expensive?  Think markets are efficient and effective?  Come and learn about three initiatives and consider adding your voice!  

Please let me know if you are planning to attend the "Driving Through the Fog" conversation this Sunday led by Benny Smith and his mother, Sue Smith. We want to have plenty of sandwiches.

 

PLEASE RSVP to rector@christchurchrochester.org

 

See you in church!

Ruth+

  Dear Christ Church,    I encourage you join the efforts of Sanctuary at Christ Church in whatever ways you can as part of your Lenten observation. The following effort is led by myself, Shirley Ricker, and the youth of Christ Church. If you would like to donate a baked good, please contact me at  rector@christchurchrochester.org . Please bring neighbors and friends.    See you in church,    Ruth+ 

Dear Christ Church,

I encourage you join the efforts of Sanctuary at Christ Church in whatever ways you can as part of your Lenten observation. The following effort is led by myself, Shirley Ricker, and the youth of Christ Church. If you would like to donate a baked good, please contact me at rector@christchurchrochester.org. Please bring neighbors and friends.

See you in church,

Ruth+ 

No One Left Behind

Dear Christ Church,

I encourage you join the efforts of Sanctuary at Christ Church in whatever ways you can as part of your Lenten observation. The following effort, "The Giving Board," is led by Lucie Parfitt and Vicki McCutchon as part of a larger effort of the No One Left Behind project. 

WHAT IS THE GIVING BOARD?

It is a way that Christ Church is helping Afghan and Iraqi refugees and friends that are moving to the US through the No One Left Behind Project.  Christ Church is working with Asbury First Methodist Church to help in this project.

Please take a card from a bulletin board in either the hall or in the back of the church and then next week bring the items in and fill the tote that is located in the back of the church.

If you have any questions about the project please see or email LUCIE PARFITT, luciem3773@gmail.com.

Please give any monetary or gift card donations to Lucie or to Vicki McCutchon.  Money or gift card donations can also be put in the offering plate in one of the envelopes provided at the back of the church.  If there are questions on items to be provided Lucie or Vicki will be happy to answer any questions.

LET'S FILL THE TOTES CHRIST CHURCH!!!!!

Thank you Christ Church!

 

Bulletin Insert from Finance Committee (beginning 3/19)

 

From the Finance Committee

Thanks to all who responded so generously to our request for increased giving. We anticipated a deficit of $10,000 at this point in the calendar year and find ourselves, instead, with a small surplus. The hard work is far from over, with another 10 months to go, but this is great news – THANK YOU!

 

February YTD

Income:  $67,507.60

Expenses: $57,704.49

Balance YTD: $9,803.11

Lent 2017

Doors of Corn Hill  © Barbara Ford (pictured above)

For everyone who asks receives, and the one who seeks finds, and to the one who knocks it will be opened.

PASSION SUNDAY

Eucharist    8 a.m.

Palms Liturgy & Sung Eucharist11 a.m.

  

MAUNDY THURSDAY

Eucharist    12:05 p.m.

Solemn Choral Eucharist    7:00 p.m.

 

GOOD FRIDAY

Chanted Passion12 Noon

 

HOLY SATURDAY

GREAT VIGIL OF EASTER7:00 p.m.

 

EASTER DAY

Holy Eucharist 8:00a.m.

Solemn Choral Eucharist 11 a.m. 

1488396505314.jpeg

Ash Wednesday Holy Eucharist and ashes  5:30

 The 2nd Station of the Cross  Jesus Takes up His Cross   ©T. Jutsum

The 2nd Station of the Cross

Jesus Takes up His Cross   ©T. Jutsum

My song is love unknown,
my Savior's love to me,
love to the loveless shown
that they might lovely be.
O who am I
that for my sake
my Lord should take
frail flesh and die?

Here might I stay and sing,
no story so divine:
never was love, dear King,
never was grief like thine.
This is my friend,
in whose sweet praise
I all my days
could gladly spend.

 

I Walked Alone in a Dark Wood  ©T. Jutsum 2005

Editor note:

 

So, imagine that you're in a room, sitting on a chair, talking to someone you trust about some stuff that bothers you. You're pouring your heart out. You're really letting all the broken things out; the hurt, the anger, the loneliness, the awful sense that you deserve to have satisfaction instead of frustration, the deep hole lined with anxious worry, the fear that you're wrong about everything as you try to convince yourself, and the friend you trust, that you're mostly right, right enough. Your friend can't even begin to touch this pain. It is one big ball of horrible.

 

You look up, for no reason at all. Jesus is there. It isn't like there was a moment when he appeared. He just was there. And, he is huge. Actually, he is getting bigger and bigger. Then you notice that the chair is gone. Then you notice that the room is gone. Then you notice that there is only him. He laughs. It is the sound of perfect joy. It is the only thing that you want. He laughs again and says in a voice that is big as the sea or sky, " You make me so small." Then, he laughs again. 

 

This is the heart of Lent. It is the season of supernatural remembering. The tools that the Spirit of God uses are ash, to remind us that we live in a bigger world than the one we can see, and bread and wine, the food with the power to nourish the life we live there. We have been given the unimaginable gift of experiencing it together. It is all about him and how really big he really is.

 

Val Jutsum

I made this in college. It was the season of Lent, but I was not going to church in those days. I was angry with the Church for trying to contain the Uncontainable, as though the Church should somehow, unlike other human institutions, be free from human hypocrisy or small mindedness.

 

Anyway, when I drew this and wrote the words that go with it, I was trying to express the wilderness exile of simply being human. I still feel it, but I don't suffer it anymore. "Home" will always feel like "wilderness," and "wilderness" will always be "home" because, as children of God, we walk with one foot in this world and the other foot not.

Ruth +

Christ Church Music Notes From Stephen Kennedy

Listening can be an incredibly active and participatory state.  Listening can awaken our thoughts and stir our emotions.  Listening can connect us to others in the present and across the centuries.  Listening can guide our meditation, reflection, and contemplation.   Listening makes us think and realize that we are not alone.  The Lenten season is filled with incredibly rich and moving liturgical music.  We invite everyone who attends Christ Church liturgies to fully participate by listening as well as engaging in chanting and singing. 

 

Stephen Kennedy

Music Director

Christ Church Rochester

Instructor of Sacred Music

Eastman School of Music

 Room with a view © Renate Eckart

Room with a view © Renate Eckart

EVENTS

 

EVENTS and ANNOUNCEMENTS in This Issue

Sanctuary at Christ Church -

Voices From Exile, No One Left Behind, and The Giving Board

 

Latest Sunday Bulletin *

*(New feature- when you click on an image below it will become full size and you can scroll through the pages)

Finance Report

Candlelight Concert with Compline- see below

A meditation from Mary Pietrzykowski

a Memory of Michelle Stanley by her daughter Alexandra 

A Spiritual Autobiography by Ron Hilton

Homily for Morning Prayer by Mary Anne Wickett 

R.A.I.H.N.

Pittsford Food Cupboard

Episcopal Relief and Development

Vestry Minutes from February

From the Archives

 Just click on this link-   http://songforchristchurch.org/contact/

Just click on this link- http://songforchristchurch.org/contact/

Dear Christ Church,

I encourage you join the efforts of Sanctuary at Christ Church in whatever ways you can as part of your Lenten observation. The following effort is led by myself, Shirley Ricker, and the youth of Christ Church. If you would like to donate a baked good, please contact me at rector@christchurchrochester.org. Please bring neighbors and friends.

See you in church,

Ruth+ 

No One Left Behind

Dear Christ Church,

I encourage you join the efforts of Sanctuary at Christ Church in whatever ways you can as part of your Lenten observation. The following effort, "The Giving Board," is led by Lucie Parfitt and Vicki McCutchon as part of a larger effort of the No One Left Behind project. 

Afghan New Year Dinner

with No One Left Behind Tuesday, March 21: 6:00-9:00 pm

Asbury First United Methodist Church, 1050 East Avenue, Rochester, NY 14607

Our Afghan and Iraqi friends arrive in Rochester with only one suitcase with their hopes of peace after years of service to our military forces. They need apartments, furniture, and personal supplies. Join us on March 21st- the celebrated New Year (and first full day of spring), to raise money to pay for each family's first month's rent and security, food, bus passes, and a modest car grant so they can get jobs. Please join us for a celebratory dinner and to learn more about No One Left Behind. We will have traditional Afghan/Iraqi food, a silent auction, music, and a short program of NOLB stories from our Rochester Chapter. For more information, or to volunteer, or purchase a ticket, please contact Lucie at luciem3773@gmail.com.

Sanctuary at Christ Church is co- sponsoring this event.

 

WHAT IS THE GIVING BOARD?

It is a way that Christ Church is helping Afghan and Iraqi refugees and friends that are moving to the US through the No One Left Behind Project.  Christ Church is working with Asbury First Methodist Church to help in this project.

Please take a card from a bulletin board in either the hall or in the back of the church and then next week bring the items in and fill the tote that is located in the back of the church.

If you have any questions about the project please see or email LUCIE PARFITT, luciem3773@gmail.com.

Please give any monetary or gift card donations to Lucie or to Vicki McCutchon.  Money or gift card donations can also be put in the offering plate in one of the envelopes provided at the back of the church.  If there are questions on items to be provided Lucie or Vicki will be happy to answer any questions.

LET'S FILL THE TOTES CHRIST CHURCH!!!!!

Thank you Christ Church!

Bulletin Insert from Finance Committee (beginning 3/19)

 

From the Finance Committee

Thanks to all who responded so generously to our request for increased giving. We anticipated a deficit of $10,000 at this point in the calendar year and find ourselves, instead, with a small surplus. The hard work is far from over, with another 10 months to go, but this is great news – THANK YOU!

 

February YTD

Income:  $67,507.60

Expenses: $57,704.49

Balance YTD: $9,803.11


Lenten Reflection

As we move toward this year's Lenten journey, many of us are considering how best to fulfill our calling as Christians to "represent Christ and his Church; to bear witness to him wherever we may be; and, according to the gifts given them, to carry on Christ's work of reconciliation in the world; and to take their place in the life, worship and governance of the Church."  (BCP, pg. 855)

Personal reflection on how my faith motivates me toward action has led me to take part in Education for Ministry (EFM) which is a four year program that includes Biblical study, Church History, Theology and Ethics, and importantly, a way of reflecting where God acts in my life.  

I am in year two of the program the focus of which is a study of the New Testament.  Each week our group meets to discuss our readings and to explore our own questions about our faith.  Within this setting, I have deepened my understanding of my faith and increased my ability to listen with care to different points of view.   I have been and continue to be nourished by exposure to the thoughts of theologians like Teilhard de Chardin.  Here is a sampling from today's reading in our reflection guide:  "God, in all that is most living and incarnate in him, is not far away from us, altogether apart from the world we see, touch, hear, smell and taste about us.  Rather, he awaits us every instant in our action, in the work of the moment.  There is a sense in which he is at the tip of my pen, my spade, my brush, my needle-of my heart and of my thought."  (The Divine Milieu)

This reflection is animating as it elevates human activity away from the mundane and toward leading a life of purpose and resolve.

My reflection may read more like an adverisement for EFM than a Lenten meditation, but I wanted to share with you how important EFM has been in my life, and could be in yours, as well.  If you feel that you might be interested, you can contact Nancy Grear at 585-305-5727 or Donna D'Angio at 585-381-0363..  

Mary Pietrzykowski


a Memory of Michelle Stanley by her daughter Alexandra

Shared by Mary Schultz, Michelle's mother

20 years ago I entered this world into the arms of my mom, my dad, and all the amazing family that surrounded me then and still surrounds me now, especially today. But never did I know the abundance of love I would receive, and the person that I would become because of that love and all else that my mom taught me.

You fought a long, hard battle Mom, but you always managed to have a smile on your face. It was never about you, only about making sure that everyone else was taken care of before yourself. You held on for so long, and we know that it was just because you were worried about leaving us behind. But we will be ok because of the person you were and the people you helped us all to become. You gave everyone such special memories and pieces of you to hold onto. You gave me the best 5 siblings, an amazing dad, and the rest of your family and friends to remember you, love you, and laugh with forever. And I know you'll be up there watching us all grow up into the people you showed us, with your love, how to become.

This isn't easy, and it never will be. But Mom, the person you were and the friendships you created for yourself and for all of us are what makes it a little easier. There are endless stories to share and happy memories to dwell on. You were full of so much love and had such a strong faith, and every person that you touched in your 44 years could feel it. There will be hard times for sure. I will miss waking up to the smell of pancakes and blueberry sauce cooking, and I'll miss sending you pictures of my outfit so you can tell me how to make it better. And I'll think of you every time I smell lavender lotion, the leaves candle, when I'm sitting on the beach and it's just the perfect weather, when "My Wish" comes on the radio, or when someone talks about why dunkin' donuts coffee is the best. But there will be good times too. Like when I get to tell people where I learned to cook so well, when I get to tell my kids why I love birthdays so much, and when I get to tell my kids, and everyone, that everything I do right with them is because of you.

The past few years have been hard, and I know they were much harder for you than you let yourself show. You're the strongest person I know, and we all have peace of mind knowing that you are in a much better place and painless now. You used to always say to me, "you'll be all grown up and I'll still be worrying about you, I'll still be watching over you." I'm holding you to that one now mom!! I love you to the moon and back!!

 

Alexandra Stanley, Mary Schultz's granddaughter,  wrote this on her Facebook page on the evening after her mother died. 

My Spiritual Autobiography

Ron Hilton, 12/04/2013; edited 03/06/2017

I was six years old, or thereabouts, when my mother and I charged out, just the two of us, toward Trinity Church in Geneva from our home on Colt Street on the windiest, and some would say coldest, day of the year.  We would have held hands, but our hands were buried in oversized gloves for her, mittens for me.  I don’t remember much about the service, but I know it was at 8:00, that my mother received Holy Communion but I did not, and that the return trip was just as cold as the trek to church 45 minutes before.  But there was a difference.  Just two blocks from our house, and short blocks at that, my mom said, “How would you like to stop at Eisenman’s for a hot chocolate?”  I almost trembled at the thought.  We were as poor as any Depression family, and we almost never went to restaurants.  But we went, and I still can remember, now 75 years later, the decorative whipped cream on top and the package of crackers on the side.  And no hot chocolate has tasted quite so good ever since.  And no time with my mother was ever closer.

About the church, I was almost certain as I stood with my nose on the back of the pew in front of us, that I could smell the wood.   (More about this later.)

In my early teens I nearly died from pneumonia, the result in part of being a civilian when antibiotics were reserved for the military in WWII.  A year later I was diagnosed with a potentially fatal kidney infection, so serious that it required the removal of that kidney.

The specialist’s office was almost across the street from Trinity Church (no longer my church, since we had moved a few years before to Penn Yan, and St. Mark’s Church, where I had been an acolyte and a communion recipient for four years) Mom and I went into the church and prayed, both fervently, and again I thought I smelled the wood.  I felt more closely connected to God and this particular church than I ever had before.  When three months later, in Rochester rather than Geneva, with another surgeon, I found my surgery delayed for five days because of a cold, I was immensely relieved to see my doctor enter the room—a four-bed room with three other children, all of whom seemed much sicker than I---to explain the surgery, and that for the first time.  Tom Talley knew that surgeon (Tom a nephrologist and Dr. Kobilak a urologist), and thought very highly of him.

For some reason I was quite convinced that I would not survive the surgery.  That evening and early the next day I prayed with great earnestness—and with a greater sense of peace than I had ever before experienced—that God might spare me or take me, whichever made more sense to him.  The sense of great peace continued until the next morning when I discovered my mom would not be there to say goodbye to me as I was wheeled out.  I found out later that she had run into unusual traffic and the route (without 490 or a thruway) which normally took two hours, took at least a half hour more.  When I woke up from surgery, I thought my first job was to cheer her up.  That was very hard to do since I was violently sick to my stomach twice an hour for 24 hours.  She stayed overnight with some friends in Rochester, and by the next afternoon I had begun to heal.  The aura of peace did not leave for several days, and I’ve often thought how comforting, how deeply peaceful, it was to relax in arms of the Lord, and really believe it.  It has been my reference point for spiritual centeredness ever since.

Yet another six years forward and I made a terrible discovery, as my first year at Geneseo drew to a close.  A smell associated with an illness I had had nearly all my life, was causing my housemates to ask, in my absence as they thought, “What could possibly cause such a terrible odor?”  “If he could have done something about it, don’t you think he would have?”  I sat half way up the stairs to my room, listening, slowly sobbing, trying to be absolutely quiet.  I went for a walk before reentering my room, which was where that conversation had been taking place, my roommate a participant.

Only three months and two miracles later, I sat among some fellow camp counselors on Silver Lake, NY, when the camp doctor (with whom I learned that night, the first night of a six-week camp experience, we all would gather almost every night to talk about anything anybody wanted to), said, “It’s time to break up.  But you, young man, I wish you’d stay a minute,” and of course I did.  After all my new associates had left, he said he thought I wanted to talk to him privately about something.  In another hour, he knew my awful story, and convinced me that he could write the AMA in Chicago that very night, and we would learn within the six weeks we would be there, whether there was anywhere in the world that was successfully treating atrophic rhinitis.  Seven weeks later another counselor and I hitchhiked to Philadelphia, PA, he for the jaunt and I to meet Dr. Matthew Ersner.  

By Christmastime I had the miraculous operation that only he could perform (the other two doctors treating this condition were in Norway and Brazil).  By that time too, I had formed a close friendship with the rector of St. Michael’s parish in Geneseo and the Episcopal chaplain to the College at Geneseo, Fr. Walter Muir.  Before I graduated two and one half years later, he asked me whether I’d ever thought I might be called to the ministry.  I replied that I hadn’t, and that I was pretty committed to trying my hand at teaching, but that I would think about it hard and long.

Nearly thirty years later I thought I had received that call, but despite the support of my parish priest and the vestry of St. Luke’s Brockport, and even with my psychotherapist on the Commission on Ministry, that group thought otherwise.  Then as now, I believe, there is no recourse to those denied by the commission (except diocese jumping, more common than I would have imagined at the time).  By that time as well I had been hospitalized six times for mental illness, placed on and weaned off more than a dozen psychotropic drugs, been an active member of four Episcopal churches—as Sunday School teacher, lay reader, lay preacher, and what was then called Eucharistic minister—married and divorced twice, completed a Ph.D. at Syracuse University, and just named full professor at RIT, where I had been working for nearly twenty years.  I was also a department chair of a rather large department in the College of Continuing Education.  Unlike many institutions, the chairs at RIT, however selected, serve for long periods of time, I for 25 of my 30 years there.

In those days Bill Cosby had a great routine about getting Novocain in a dentist’s office.  The punch line, after the dentist had sent smoke spiraling from his mouth, was “nebby mind, nebby mind.”  Well, although I did not think that the Lord spoke in Cosbyesque language, then or now, I did have the sense of his hand on my shoulder, subduing my smoldering anger and convincing me that I would find my ministry some other way, in a way that would not require ordination; neither would it require my leaving the Episcopal Church.

So, never mind, thou good and faithful fifty-one-year old servant, I said to myself, in 1983.  I trusted that the Lord would guide me. Shortly thereafter, I felt guided to Christ Church, not really because a recent former student of mine, Sharon Scott, was a member there, but that didn’t hurt.  I worshiped here before she and I began to date, and we dated then for two years before we married.  Most folks think we have been married for at least one lifetime, and I guess I do too. In my 35 years at Christ Church, I have been a vestry member at least three times, a Sunday school teacher for only a day, and a senior warden for something like eight months.  I’ve cooked for A Meal and More, provided food and shoes and coats and sweaters for its guests, served on the Finance Committee for nearly fifteen years, and gotten at least not to feel like an interloper here.  

In the last three years I spent training as a pastoral visitor, a fairly rigorous program of instruction and life examination for those who feel called to visit the sick and the dying.  It has been a peculiarly satisfying late-life vocation, sitting by David Sisson and recalling his late wife Janet before he was called—he firmly believed—to visit her and to meet Jesus

I cannot say I have no regret that the Commission on Ministry did not find me a suitable candidate for priesthood, but neither am I dissatisfied with my role as an active lay

Christian.  It is curious that a person who grew up in St. Mark’s Church Penn Yan, as our diocese refers to it, would or could become so fully at home amidst the bells and smells and relatively high church ways of our parish.

I firmly believe a little sentence learned in Marriage Encounter many years ago:  “God’s not finished with me yet.”  I also believe an expanded version of this that I have learned largely at Ruth’s tutelage:  “God’s absolutely delighted with you just the way you are, but God’s not finished with you yet.”  Now, at nearly 85, I look forward in no great haste to my continuing education and formation as a Christian and as an Episcopalian.

HOMILY FOR MORNING PRAYER ON MARCH 22, 2016

 Mary Anne Wickett

For one whole glorious year, my husband Tom and I had a church in Florida.  We had a beautiful parsonage that sat on the banks for the Alafia River.  Tom and I used to take long walks every morning, and as soon as we had finished, Tom would go and start breakfast, and I would go to my favorite tree and pray.  This tree hung over the river and I found a nice spot where I could sit and be as far away from the fire ants as I could possibly be.   Now I have to tell you, that it was not until later, that I found out there were alligators in the river. A bit scary when I think about it. But as I sat there, I would look at the Palm trees that surrounded our home, and I couldn’t help thinking of Jesus’ triumphant entry into Jerusalem.  

I was afraid to pick up the Palm fronds that had fallen onto the ground for fear of the fire ants, but I imagined the crowds, as they picked the palms and used them to welcome Jesus.  It must have been an exciting time – Word about his coming had spread throughout the countryside. He was a healer, a teacher and a leader.  He had become a celebrity and now he was coming to Jerusalem – but there were some who were not so happy about Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem.  These were the Sadducees who were an aristocratic society in Israel that dominated the higher ranks of the priesthood.  They had no desire to have Jesus take their status away from them, and so, even as the crowd waves its palm branches and shouts its hosannas, the shadow of the cross looms in the background.

Can you imagine the emotions that surging through Jesus’ mind as he rode the humble donkey into Jerusalem that day? He was not fooled by the crowd’s adoration.  He knew that public opinion could turn on him at any moment.  He knew what lay ahead of him and he did not welcome it.  Rejection, pain, death – it was not the cup he would have chosen for himself.  He had no martyr complex.  He did not willingly seek to die.  He merely sought to be obedient to God.  Can you imagine the disappointment Jesus felt as he looked into the faces of the people around him on that first Holy Week?

• Disappointment with the crowds who would shout “hosanna” one moment and “crucify him” the next.

• Disappointment with Judas who would betray him

• Disappointment with his most trusted disciple, Peter, who would deny him

• Disappointment with his three closes disciples, who couldn’t even stay awake on the job while he agonized over the cup the Father had set before him.

After all Jesus had been to them, can you imagine the hurt he must have felt?  We are never quite prepared, are we, when someone close to us sticks a knife into our hearts. You expect your enemies to betray you, but someone you love and trust.  Unfortunately, it happens – Friends betray friends, family members betray family members.  Even members of the Body of Christ have been known to betray other members – just as Judas betrayed Jesus.  But what happened to Judas?  Why did he betray Jesus?  Christians have been asking that question for two thousand years.  Was it jealousy?  Every leader has to deal with the envy of people who resent his or her position and authority.  Was it the thirty pieces of silver?  Maybe!  Money certainly has a way of corrupting some people.  In the Gospel according to St. John, it tells us that Jesus was eating a meal in the house of Mary, Martha and Lazarus.  Mary used expensive oil to anoint Jesus’ feet and Judas was very upset about it.  “The money could be given to the poor,” says Judas.  

Maybe the scholars are right when they speculate that Judas was trying to force Jesus’ hand – was Judas a radical?  Maybe Judas was tired of hearing about a kingdom that was YET TO COME.  Maybe he wanted Jesus to right the wrongs of the world HERE AND NOW.  There are a lot of maybes’ and I don’t think that we will ever really know the answers.  The only thing we do know is that Judas regretted what he did to Jesus – For it tells us in the Book of Matthew that “Judas repented and brought back the thirty pieces of silver to the chief priests and the elders”.  And he said to them, “I have sinned by betraying innocent blood.”  We all know what happened next – after betraying Jesus for just thirty pieces of silver, Judas couldn’t live with his regrets and so he hung himself.  Have you ever been filled with regret for something you did?  There is probably not one of us that hasn’t done something that they have regretted.

Famous writer Antoine de Saint-Exupery, author of such works as The Little Prince, was called back into active duty with the French Air Force.  While flying an unarmed observation mission, his plane was shot down by a young German flyer, and the great French writer was killed.  Now, it just so happened that the young pilot who shot Saint-Exupery down, had been in the process of writing his doctoral dissertation on the life and works of this very same author.  The pilot was an avid admirer of the Frenchman and worshiped the ground he walked on.  When he learned who it was that he had shot down, he suffered a nervous breakdown.  All he could do was repeat over and over again, “I have killed my master!  I have killed my master!”

There are few emotions that can tear the fabric of the human soul more profoundly than guilt and regret.  The question is, do our actions, our words, and our misdeeds stand as a barrier between ourselves and God?  I believe they do.  I believe that it is possible to live in a world of brokenness and betrayal for so long that you think that it’s the real world – even the right world.  Look at what is happening in our world today – especially as we think of Brussels this morning – it seems it’s OK to rant and rage about who is the best politician.  It’s OK to do the thing you know are not right.   So, YES, our misdeeds, our transgressions, our sin can be a barrier between ourselves and God.  But thank goodness we know that we have a God that never gives up on us.  The tragedy of Judas’ life is NOT that he betrayed Christ, because “All have sinned and fallen short of the glory of God.” No, the tragedy was that Judas did NOT discover Christ’s grace.  He thought that his situation was so hopeless that his only way out was death.  But his situation did NOT constitute death as the only way out – that is was the cross is all about. God loves each one of us with a deep and abiding love, and I don’t have the slightest doubt in the world, that God loved Judas – If only Judas hadn’t given up! Jesus went into the Garden of Gethsemane knowing that there was no way to avoid the pain of the cross, and so Jesus let go of his own will and surrendered to God’s will.  Judas realized his mistake and repented, but he didn’t surrender to God’s will – he didn’t have enough faith.  Do you or I have enough faith to let go and let God – It’s a hard thing to do, isn’t it?  But Holy Week is a time to remember Jesus’ submission to the will of God.  It is a time when we remember that because of Jesus’ suffering, because he went to the cross on our behalf, we can have, not only an abundant life on this earth, but eternal life in heaven.  It is a time when we acknowledge that our God is a gracious God, who will never give up on you or me.  

R.A.I.H.N.

 **Next RAIHN volunteer week is scheduled for MARCH 19-25 (there are currently 5 families(14 individuals) in the RAIHN program this month.

**There are still a few volunteer openings for the hospitality and overnight shifts (see description below) Contact Beatrice at 585-880-7029 if you'd like to volunteer

7-9pm Hospitality Volunteer – Provide friendly companionship during the guests’ stay.  (Volunteers have brought along fun activities with them to hospitality hour such as books, family friendly videos, crafts, games,  instruments etc , but no accessories are necessary, sometime just being there is all a guest may need of you.)

9PM-7AM- Overnight Volunteer- Spend the night at Two Saints (were family are housed for the week). Volunteers have separate rooms. Volunteers are present to help trouble shoot with guest for any concerns. Volunteers are supported by Coordinator John Burr by phone for any matters they cannot address. There are usually two volunteers on this shift.

**SAVE THE DATE for Car City 2017 - Saturday, May 6th – Sunday, May 7th at Asbury First United Methodist Church.  The donor drive site is now open for registration:

http://familypromise.donordrive.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=donorDrive.event&eventID=745

**2017 Volunteer Trainings   

·         Thursday, April 6, 2017, 6:30 pm, Mary Magdalene Church, 1008 Main St., East Rochester

·         Wednesday, June 7, 2017, 6:30 pm, St. Paul's Episcopal Church, 25 Westminster Rd., Rochester

·         Second Level Training for experienced volunteers - Thursday, March 23rd, 2017, 6:30 - 8:00 pm, Third Presbyterian Church, 4 Meigs St., Rochester

RAIHN Donation needs: 

RAIHN DAY CENTER NEED – Double or queen mattresses – it you have one to donate, please give us a call!  Thank you.

 Theophany © 2003 Tim Jutsum

Theophany © 2003 Tim Jutsum

PLEASE HELP FILL THE FOOD CUPBOARD BASKET

The Pittsford Food Cupboard supplies over 4,000 households totaling over 9,400 people.  They provide food and other items to 6 different zip codes:  E Rochester, Pittsford, Brighton and 3 in Rochester.  Some items they are always in need of:

  • Pasta and pasta sauce
  • Canned fruits and vegetables
  • Hearty soups and tuna
  • Cereals

The items are dropped off to the food cupboard once a month.  The volunteers are always so appreciative. Thank you Christ Church for helping to fill the basket that is in the back of the church every Sunday.


Episcopal Relief and Development: Healing a Hurting World

 

This is a reminder to make a donation to Episcopal Relief and Developmentduring Lent.   The website www.episcopalrelief.org gives this summary of their work:  Episcopal Relief & Development reaches over 3 million people annually, through long-term programs and disaster response efforts with local partners in approximately 40 countries. We work directly with Anglican Communion and other partners to carry out our mission of empowering people to find lasting solutions to poverty, hunger and disease.

By working through local church people and connecting with local relief partners in these 40 countries, ERD has access to individuals who know the people and the region, allowing relief to be delivered as quickly and efficiently as possible in times of disaster, before specially trained teams and additional supplies are able to reach the area from outside.

On the ERD website, you can learn about on-going programs in particular countries, and you can direct donations to one of twelve designated areas, including South Sudan, clean water, United States disaster relief, economic empowerment, child survival, and so on.   

Click on "Gifts for Life" to see more specific options, such as training and equipment to be a beekeeper (a means of support that requires very little land) or a flock of chickens or a small cooking stove that will not explode.  ERD has done the ground work to enable us to change lives---one life, one family, one village at a time.

You can make a donation online or by phone 1-855-312-4325 or by mail to

Episcopal Relief & Development

P.O. Box 7058 

Merrifield, VA 22116-7058.


Christ Church Vestry Minutes

February Vestry Minutes

Rector’s Report: 

Ruth reported on the Capital Campaign: "Perhaps the most eventful news of the month is that we will not be working with the Klote firm on a capital campaign. Your wardens, campaign team, and I agree: while it's been a hard learning curve, it is not time to run a professional campaign on the scale we'd planned. I was advised that a campaign as ours (drawing heavily on the support of our neighborhood community) is best undertaken when we know more who our potential leaders are and what kinds of gifts they can lead with. While this feels like a big setback, it is not unusual for consultants and clients to mutually agree that there are reasons they should not go forward together with a campaign. As I wrote to the parish: the campaign team and I will "go back to the drawing board."

Ruth also announced that Marianne Sickels who has worked for Christ Church for more than 30 years plans to retire on June 29, 2017. We are working on an up-to-date job description and will embark on a search for a new parish secretary. We will miss Marianne terribly, and we will work together to celebrate her time with us and give her a send-off in June.

And finally, she talked about past and upcoming events. The Youth Formation Group had a meaningful retreat at the Abbey of the Genesee. In March, Ruth will offer an Adult Formation class for adults seeking confirmation, reaffirmation of vows, reception into the Episcopal Church, or simply forum for prayer, study, and faith sharing.

Sanctuary at Christ Church has evolved into a parish and community network for sharing information about outreach efforts and interfaith work in Rochester. Christ Church co – sponsored “An Inauguration of Hope” at the First Unitarian Church on Winton in January, and we are now supporting the youth hosted “Voices in Exile” at Christ Church on March 18th, an interfaith fundraiser for refugee resettlement in Rochester. We are also co-sponsoring the No one Left Behind Organization’s fundraising event – an Afghan New Year Celebration Dinner March 21 at Asbury Methodist Church. This is an organization that brings Iraqi and Afghan military personnel who fought alongside Americans in the Iraq war to America and helps them start a life here, away from violence and threats to their lives. Finally, there will be a Lenten book study (“Tears We Cannot Stop: A Sermon to White America” by Michael Eric Dyson) along with an opportunity to do the Stations of the Cross.

Guest: Todd Rubiano, CFO of Diocesan (apportionment & deficit conversation)

We invited Todd to talk about the process of determining apportionment. Diocesan information he discussed with us included the following:  Apportionment is set on the basis of the Operating Expenses and does not include a church’s endowment or savings account. Many of our parishes operate at a deficit - the key is "how big" and for "how long"?  A prudent rate to draw on savings/endowment is in the range of 4-6%. Churches usually run out of people before they run out of money.

Jazz Festival

·       CC needs to charge the Jazz Festival a fee for use of the church with piano moving and services of the sexton included.  The Jazz Festival is now a for-profit organization.

·       The piano is tuned every night and this is unusual wear and tear on the instrument. Something between $50-$100 per day would be a reasonable fee for us to consider. This fee should be directed into a CC instrument fund to help secure maintenance.

·       Professional movers must be employed to move the piano if it is to be moved into the Chancel.  CC should arrange for the piano movers and the bill should be figured into the church rental fee. They have on occasion not used professional movers in the past and our piano has been damaged.

·       Deb will ask JF committee to discuss this with the JF organizers when they meet.

Care Team update:

Kevin, Josie, Carolyn and Jim will work on a description of what the Care Team offers. After that description, people who offered help to Care Team on “Call Me” cards will be contacted. And possibly the whole congregation will be offered the opportunity to volunteer with specific services again.

Guest: Paddy Collins-Bohrer

The Vestry welcomed Paddy as he updated us on where he is in his journey toward ordination. He has applied to be ordained to the diaconate. The Vestry enthusiastically supports this step.

Finance Committee Report

Committee will meet every second Sunday, following the 8:00 service, beginning March 12. Please submit any requests for Committee review by the preceding Friday.

January Financials (from Norm Geil, dated 2/8/17)

  • 2017 deficit so far:  $1,600
  • End of January target for the budget was 8.3%:
  • Income was at 10% (envelopes $4k higher than Jan ’16)
  • Expenses were at 9%
  • Deficit was at 3%.
  • Account Balances: Checking: $99,600, Fidelity: $297,000, Amsden: about $225,000, Flower Fund: $11,000

2017 Annual Meeting Appeal Update: 11 “YES” cards received to-date, totaling $6,340 (annual) increase

Property Committee Report

The Property Committee continues to meet to review potential preventive maintenance projects for the parish as well as address immediate repairs. The Committee met on February 9th to discuss and develop a capital projects list. This list development continues.  The Committee is addressing the leak in the Sacristy with the help of CSTM Roofing.  Additionally, the flashing on the roof by the apartments. CSTM will be fixing that as well.  An employee of Sacred Sites will be on site on March 8th to conduct a walk-through for our grant application. Jennifer Ahrens from Bero Architecture will attend this meeting to assist on questions regarding the Lawn Street façade.  Finally, the Property Committee has been meeting with Go Green LED International to look at examples for the Chancel lighting improvements.


From the Archives

Thanks to the loan of books from Christ Church archivist Mary Schultz, The Song will be highlighting some excerpts about Christ Church history in this and future issues. We are fortunate to have two history books that were written about the church, Christ Church: A Story-Chronological, by Jane Marsh Parker, covering the years 1854-1905, andChrist Church Rochester: The First Hundred Years 1855-1955,  by James Demcey Hendryx.

Part V Please watch this space: we are looking into the histories of some of the donated items in Christ Church such as the angel where the lectors read, the statue of Mary, and other beautiful items.

Epiphany 2017

Word made Flesh© Tim Jutsum 2005

 Lamb of God  ©David Jutsum 2017

Lamb of God  ©David Jutsum 2017

And the Word became flesh and lived among us, and we have seen his glory, the glory of the only begotten of the Father, full of grace and truth...No one has ever seen God. It is God the only Son, who is close to the Father’s heart, who has made him known.

Baptism of Jesus © James He Qi http://www.heqiart.com

Editor note:

Sermon at Calvary Episcopal Church, January 8, 2017, baptism of Elijah James Marble

The Rev’d Steven T. Metcalfe

 

“And in the temple of the Lord, all are crying, ‘Glory’”.   How could we help but sing “Glory” when we allow our true, God given selves to shine in the shadows of worldly ignorance?  We cry “glory” today because here and throughout the Christian world we celebrate the “coming out”, so to speak, of the savior Jesus Christ.  Following in the footsteps of his Messianic enlightenment in baptism, we celebrate the baptism of one more precious soul, and maybe thousands throughout the world.  Here, Elijah James will be bound to Christ as a brother, an eternal child of God…..As have all of us. So many have sort of let their baptism lapse into routine religiosity-- at best.   How perilous it is to let our baptism slip away, ending up as a crumpled slip of paper in the back of that old junk drawer holding its treasure of parking tickets not paid, apologies not sent, and half burned candle stubs.  I can’t stress this enough: the world appears to be getting even murkier and more dangerous, signaling the time for this Body of Christ to wake up, “come out” of hiding, be the Glory which engulfs the forces of mayhem.

Inevitably, we think of ourselves as creatures of earth.  The product of this reasonable ignorance is obsession with what happens here in our societies.  Why would we imagine anything different? Ties to earth are extremely strong.  Born into families with other human beings, growing older, having experiences, caring for our bodies, contributing to the goings on in our world, living as an individual being among millions of other beings, it’s difficult to remember we are citizens of heaven. We’re unconsciously taught that “me” is what can be seen, touched, heard, smelled, or tasted.  Aren’t we defined mostly as a being “the person” who looks like this or that, thinks certain ways, seems to possess certain characteristics and qualities? Being formed of the earth, these bodies wear out or are damaged, peppering life with pain and loss, as attached as we are.

  Life itself seems to chain us to this half-truth about who we are.  You and I are more truly spiritual beings, sharing Universal Christ Consciousness, who have been baptized into the life of Christ, who is fully Love incarnate.  If we don’t own that, don’t long to have our minds “renewed” in his, as St. Paul puts it, if we cannot pull away from this ego-driven world which unconsciously spawns animosity, hunger for power and treachery of every sort, then our ties to Christ will certainly atrophy.

Holy Baptism is, in earthly terms, quite simple.  That’s because to the unopened eye it is only water, prayers, a little oil and a few snapshots. St. John says, “no one has ever seen God.” We cannot, in our physicality, experience The Holy One directly.  Whoever surrenders her life to Spirit, which shows up in love, compassion, empathy, forgiveness and acceptance, is guided by the Spirit.  God is spirit.  Whoever sees Christ in human life has surrendered to the power of this Spirit and also seen God, “In whom we live and move and have our being.”  Christ saves by revealing our shared life and welcoming us into eternal life with him in God.  That’s what happens in baptism.  Sort of.  If anyone could adequately translate Spiritual truth into human language, then all the mystery of unseen realities would have long ago been articulated, logged and universally accepted.  That has not and will not be possible.  What we do have are stories, liturgical drama, prayer and sacraments—instruments of God’s grace.

So, Elijah, by the grace of God, we are given the power to open the door of the spiritual world to you.  This is not really a place, but an attitude where love is all powerful.  No one wants to hurt another, there are no traps for the unwary, no punishments for the lost.  Come through the entrance of the life of grace which calls you to see yourself and others as God does.  You will be free to let your heart soar with gratitude for whatever life brings as everything and everyone will be your teacher.  You will know you are a precious, loved expression of the divine Self which creates, sustains and inspires.  You will also be hungry for wisdom, discerning what is love, what is not empathy, what is compassion, what is forgiveness and what is not accepting. Help us as we will help you not to squander the person you are in a desperate struggle for approval, power over others, and the pitiful pleasure of indulging your whims.

My friends, this morning, pay close attention to the baptismal vows and the renewal of our baptismal covenant.  These few words describe how citizens of heaven live in a world determined to lead us to destruction.  You are evidence that God still creates human beings, not smart, biological machines.  We all want a better world.   I do not believe that can be accomplished politically. I know no other way than to intend and welcome personal transformation, to be the person who, for himself, embraces the baptismal covenant as the guide for his life. That is probably all any of us can do.  All we can do?  Love is the unfathomable creative power of God.  That is what all of us can bring to our world to overwhelm the fury of human blindness.

Rejoice in the Lord always; again I will say, Rejoice. Let your gentleness be known to everyone. The Lord is near. Do not worry about anything, but in everything by prayer and supplication with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God. And the peace of God, which surpasses all understanding, will guard your hearts and your minds in Christ Jesus. Finally, beloved, whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is pleasing, whatever is commendable, if there is any excellence and if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things. Keep on doing the things that you have learned and received and heard and seen in me, and the God of peace will be with you.

Philippians 4:8 ff

 Wandering toward the Jordan River © V. Jutsum 2017

Wandering toward the Jordan River © V. Jutsum 2017

 Baptism of Jesus- Icon

Baptism of Jesus- Icon

 Angels proclaim- M.V. Hill © 1990

Angels proclaim- M.V. Hill © 1990

                                               Rector's Notes

“For a star to be born, there is one thing that must happen: a gaseous nebula must collapse. 

So collapse. 

Crumble.

This is not your destruction. 

This is your birth.”

            Nikka Ursula

 

I feel so much compassion for the wise men who followed the star. When I was a child, my compassion surfaced as pity. No matter which crèche or nativity seen, I always read them the same: they were sad because the real king was this baby. And they had been told to give away the things that made them so kingly. To give them to the baby. Later in life my compassion surfaced as sympathy. They were the last to make it to the manger. The angels burst open the night sky with song and light for the shepherds, but not for the wise men. Far away from those angel lit skies, the wise men had to study and question all on their own the star that appeared. The slowness of their long journey seemed symbolic of the slowness of their understanding - punishment even, for living inside their heads as astrologers, as scholars.

Midlife opens a new perspective. They are wise because they don’t care about the knowledge they’ve amassed. Maybe at one point in their lives they did, but not now. These old men want to concede their power to the child – they don’t take it personally. They know that in every age there is an old order, and the old order must die to the new – they don’t take this personally, either.

They’ve lived long enough to know that true power is surrender. Surrender of possessions that otherwise possess us, whether those possessions are in our bank accounts or in our heads.  They know that every beginning is preceded by an ending, and they are comfortable enough in their own skin to be known in their period of history as “the ending.” 

And yet this changing of the guard at the manger will not mean a swift transition into the new order. Laying their crowns at the baby’s manger is not such a big deal.  What makes them wise, what makes them stand apart from everyone else, what makes them fit to be kings is how they are willing to live out the rest of their lives as strangers instead of kings. Leaving their crowns with the baby is the easy part. The hard part, the part they came all this way for, is the return journey. They won’t be the same after the manger experience (no one ever is). They won’t fit in. And they probably know that no one back home will listen to them, let alone believe them. There are journeys we make that are the stuff of legends, that are even Biblical in proportion. The journey of the magi, led by the star, is one of them.

 But it’s this other journey that fills me with compassion for the magi. It’s not so much that they won’t be the kings they once were but, (in the words of T.S. Elliot) they will live out the rest of their lives “no longer at ease in the old dispensation,” which is a hard way to live. And yet it’s the only life to live if you’ve seen and understood what the wise men have.

Maybe they’ll become prophets.

Ruth+

 Light of the Gentiles (Star of Bethlehem) ©T. Jutsum 2004

Light of the Gentiles (Star of Bethlehem) ©T. Jutsum 2004

 Gifts of the Magi wood carving- photo credit Stephen Kennedy

Gifts of the Magi wood carving- photo credit Stephen Kennedy

Christ Church Music Notes From Stephen

Program Report for Annual Meeting

 

Submitted to the parish by Stephen Kennedy January 13, 2017

Music Director

Christ Church Rochester

 

Goals from 2016 (ongoing in 2017)

 

1. Attract more people to Christ Church through our music program Goal on target

2. Raise the level of musicianship in CC ensembles Goal on target

3. Raise community awareness of our rich and diverse music program Goal on target

4. Foster the education and training of musicians in liturgical music skills Goal on target

5. Engage people from the larger community (non parishioners) to help fund

our music program Goal on target

6. Install professional microphones in the church to record CC Choir,

Youth Ensemble, Consort, CC liturgies, and concerts Not yet reached

7. Provide more opportunities for youth participation and involvement in

Liturgies through music Goal on target

8. Enhance the church’s acoustic in light of the Chancel repair and renovation Goal attained

9. Fundraising to support our parish music program Goal on target

10. Strengthen existing community collaborations and partnerships in music Goal on target

 

Opportunities for individuals to assist and contribute in our parish music program  

 

1. Compline ushers and Candle-lighters

2. Greeters at Tuesday Pipes to represent the parish

3. Volunteers to help send publicity to media via e-mail

4. Additional Youth Ensemble members

5. Additional Christ Church Choir members

6. People to help set up for Compline following the 11:00 a.m. Eucharist

7. People to assist in searching for grants and grant writing

 

Detailed information on above stated music program goals:

 

1.  Attract more people to Christ Church through our music program

We are preparing for the population increase of the East End and we want our new neighbors to find clear and irresistible reasons to call Christ Church home. We strive to attract these people through traditional as well as uncommon means.  Obviously, music is traditionally integral to our liturgy. However, our program goes much further.  It educates, captures the attention of the larger community, provides reasons for outsiders to donate funds to our parish, and collaborates with renowned institutions. Our musically rich and distinctive liturgies, ensembles for all ages, our building and acoustics, our partnership and collaboration with one of the world’s finest music schools, and Eastman’s two internationally significant pipe organs in our sanctuary are the major building blocks of this program.

Compline is perhaps the largest weekly congregation in the Diocese of Rochester. Compline attendance (October through April) from 2013-14 was 4,929. This number grew to 5,274 in 2015-16, and 2016-17 it is continuing the same trend in growth. Compline plate offering (marked for parish general operating income) from October 2015 to April 2016 was $3,630. Pru Kirkpatrick and Vicki McCutchon host fantastic Compline receptions each First Sunday of the month. These receptions provide a meeting place for newcomers, regulars, and musicians to interact and enjoy fellowship. Over the years, we have gained new parish members through their initial attraction to Compline.

Our Tuesday Pipes noon concert series collaboration with Eastman brings about 40-60 people into the Nave each week of the year.  Many have become faithful followers of this concert series and some have been attending other parish events and liturgies.  This group includes downtown office workers, students, retirees, and a regular contingent of disabled who find the organ and space to be a kind of necessary and uncommon therapy. This series provides an essential and important ingredient in the weekly lives of these attendees. David Hunt greets the public, hands out programs and parish information, schedules tours for groups, answers questions about the church and parish, and I give a welcome address on behalf of Christ Church.

We have also been enhancing avenues of communication with the parish, visitors, and the general public.  Deb Vanderbilt and I designed a new “Welcome to Christ Church” flyer, and I designed a new “Christ Church Music” flyer. Both are in full color with lots of photos and information on how to become active in the parish.  These flyers are available in the back of the church and in the hallways of the parish house. Vicki McCutchon, Val Jutsum and I have been working on the re-design of the church bulletin boards.  You will see more development on these as time progresses. We have a Friends of Music email list with a subscription of 311 people, 540 likes on the Schola Cantorum Facebook site, and 309 likes on the Christ Church Facebook site. Thanks to Pat Kingsley, Deb Vanderbilt, and Val Jutsum, we also communicate with people about parish music activities through our church website and The SONG.

We greatly appreciate everyone’s participation in music at Christ Church. Whether singing a chant or hymn, listening to a prelude or postlude, or honing a motet, we are all celebrating something important together as a family. We are grateful for the support and work of our Rector Ruth Ferguson, Wardens Josephine Dewey and Deborah Vanderbilt, the Vestry, Marianne sickles and Moses Roland.

 

2.  Raise the level of musicianship in CC ensembles

Raising the level of quality in our liturgical music ensembles benefits everyone. Striving to achieve this goal fosters interest and gives people a sense of accomplishment in doing what they love to do: making something beautiful for others.  This is a precious gift to give and to receive. Progress and improvement are contagious whether engaging in music performance or through the action of listening. It is clear that the level of musicianship in all CC ensembles has increased over the past few years.  This is essential to our education program for musicians, growing parish ensembles, and appropriately adorning our liturgies with the great music of our church traditions. We thank each member of our various parish ensembles for their dedication and commitment to their craft. Our program could not exist without their devotion to our cause and their contributions of time and talent. Beauty feeds the soul.  

 

3. Raise community awareness of our rich and diverse music program

This goal is also important for parish growth. Compline and the Schola Cantorum are extremely popular in the Rochester Community.  The Nave is nearly full each Sunday night with diverse people of all ages and faith backgrounds. Jeff Spevak, Arts and entertainment, Staff reporter from the D&C wrote about Compline in his “Resolutions for 2017.” Jeff stated that he is “going to visit places like the Memorial Art Gallery, Artisan Works, Christ Church for the Schola Cantorum Sunday-night Compline, and Kodak Hall at Eastman Theatre for a Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra show. Not because I’m writing a story. But because I just want to go.” Rochester Magazine named Candlelight Concerts & Compline the “coolest, most unusual experience in the city…” The Schola procures community interest for the parish through concerts, recordings, and radio broadcasts. Our Compline Usher and Candle-lighter team made up of: Lucy Alonzo, Patti Blaine, Bruce Blaine, Greg Hammonds, Emily Hammonds, Joan Hunt, Kathryn Jospe, Pru Kirkpatrick, Lydia Kirkpatrick, John Kirkpatrick, Kristy Liddell, Kyle Liddell, Mary Schultz, Sonja Shelton, and Marti St. George is organized by Christopher Huebner. Some of these people also set up for Compline following the 11:00 a.m. Sunday Eucharist.  Christopher cares for all the candles and manages the Schola music library and music binders.  All of these people are key to making Compline happen at Christ Church. The richness and diversity of our music program enriches our community in vital ways, grows our church, affects students from all over the world who come here to study, and impacts the quality of church music nationally.

 

4. Foster the education and training of musicians in liturgical music skills

Since about 2007, Christ Church has fostered ministry in liturgical music training.  Our Liturgical Music Initiative provides our parish with opportunities to benefit from education grant money such as what we have received over the years from the Episcopal Diocese. In 2012, a bequest from Roy VanDelinder by way of the Rochester Community Foundation enabled us to establish our VanDelinder Fellows Program in collaboration with the Eastman School of Music. This program not only provides “on the job” training for future leaders in church music but also gives our parish unique and distinctive mission. Last year’s VanDelinder Prize winner was Jeremy Jelinek.  Jeremy is currently studying in Paris at the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique et de Danse as well as being a student of the School of Gregorian Chant of Paris. He will return to ESM next fall to continue his studies. In the two years before that, Käthe Wright Kaufman was the VanDelinder Prize winner.  Käthe is currently the Organ Scholar at Truro cathedral in Cornwall U.K. where she is furthering her studies in sacred music skills.  Käthe will return to ESM in the fall.  Current Fellows are Jiaqi Shao, Madeleine Woodworth, and Alden Wright. You may read more about them on the church website under VanDelinder Fellows.  We can celebrate our parish’s commitment to liturgical music training because it creates lasting change for the betterment of people’s lives.  This mission gives enrichment to parishioners and they are encouraged to become champions in providing formation to these young people in the Episcopal Church.  

5. Engage people from the larger community (non parishioners) to help fund our music program

We are attracting donors from outside the parish to help fund program goals.  In May of 2015, friends at Irondequoit United Church of Christ, who attend Compline faithfully, hosted a fundraiser concert for Christ Church’s Friends of Music Fund.  In April of 2016, we collaborated with noted musicologist Kerala Snyder in a fundraiser concert at Christ Church by reenactment of a historic model of a liturgical concert. Professor Snyder and Eastman Organ Faculty: Edoardo Bellotti, David Higgs, William Porter, and Nathan Laube donated their professional skills for this event. In 2015, a donor outside of New York funded our purchased of a Renaissance sackbut and promises to fund another instrument this year.  A donor has also come forward with a pledge to fund another recording of the Schola Cantorum. We thank everyone who has contributed to Christ Church’s Friends of Music fund.  Such generosity allows our program to enrich the lives of countless people through music. These gifts also help build a music program in which people want to take part.

 

6. Install professional microphones in the church to record CC Choir, Youth Ensemble, Consort, CC liturgies, and concerts

This goal has yet to be reached but is on our “wish list” and we would like to develop a plan to raise funds for it. Once we are able to make this happen, we will be able to make recordings of liturgies, concerts, and all parish ensembles more easily and at a greatly reduced expense.  A recording of congregational hymn singing in various historical styles would be wonderful and fitting given our distinctive instruments and position of being a liturgical music “laboratory.”

 

7. Provide more opportunities for youth participation and involvement in Liturgies through music

It is a continuing goal to expand the role of parish youth within our liturgies. Being that my position as music director is not a full-time position, I am not able to add the needed hours required for taking directorship of the Youth Ensemble.  However, our VanDelinder Fellows program facilitates directorship of this ensemble under my supervision. The Youth Ensemble learns: traditional hymns and music of the church, music reading skills, and enjoys fellowship.  The ensemble performs on third Sundays at the 11:00 a.m. Eucharist. On Advent IV of 2016, the youth of the parish participated in the first-ever dramatic interpretation of a Gospel within a Eucharist.  A team made up of Ruth our Rector, Shirley Ricker, Marrlee Burgess, and I, worked to create a script, choreography, and music for this event.  VanDelinder Fellows, Jiaqi Shao, Madeleine Woodworth, and Alden Wright rehearsed the youth in the music and the performance was deemed a great success based upon the positive feedback from members of the congregation. At the Christmas Eve 5:00 p.m. Eucharist, the Smith Family String Players: Benny, Reagan, Asa, Liam, and Clinton, played an arrangement of carols at the Communion and the Youth Ensemble (under the direction of Madeleine Woodworth) performed "Procession" and "This Little Babe" from "A Ceremony of Carols" by Benjamin Britten. Youth involved in this ensemble this liturgical year have been: Hope McGuckin, Hanna and Liza Sommers; Asa, Benny, Clinton, Liam, and Reagan Smith; and Alex and Eva Zanibbi.

 

8. Enhance the church’s acoustic in light of the Chancel repair and renovation

We thank Christ Church parishioners Jennifer Anstey, Josephine Dewey, Ruth Ferguson, David Higgs, Alan Jones, Valerie Jutsum, Hugh Kierig, William Porter, Deborah Vanderbilt and myself for being on this team. Also on this team was Cynthia Howk, Architectural Research Coordinator from the Landmark Society of Western New York. We all worked alongside Swiatek Studios to not only decorate the Chancel but to ensure that the acoustic was not compromised.  A nationally prominent acoustician was consulted and the end result left the acoustic slightly more “alive” in the higher frequencies.  This allows sung and spoken texts to be more prominent and clear.

 

9. Fundraising to support our parish music program

As stated under goal no. 5, fundraising concerts began in 2015 and will be an ongoing part of our fundraising for Friends of Music fund. We also receive income from the sale of Christ Church Schola and organ recordings. Since 2005, CD income is above $12,000.  These recordings not only provide the parish with income but they generate distinction for Christ Church and allow us to fund future recordings. Tracks from these recordings are highlighted in national radio broadcasts such as “Pipedreams” and “With Heart and Voice.  These recordings are sold all over the world under the NAXOS label.  However, Christ Church benefits financially from only the CDs that we sell through the church.  Please consider buying some of these recordings for your friends as gifts.

 

10. Strengthen existing community collaborations and partnerships in Music

Our collaborations and partnerships with the University of Rochester’s Eastman School of Music consist in part of:

A. Two distinctive pipe organs, one cabinet organ, and one portative organ: each used regularly in liturgies and concerts.

B. Tuesday Pipes (25-minute organ concert series) brings about 40-60 people into the church each week.  Many of these people are faithful attendees and are beginning to view Christ Church as a necessary component in their lives.

C. The Christ Church Schola Cantorum is a course at the Eastman School of music.  It may be an isolated situation for a parish ensemble to be a credited course at one of the world’s leading music schools.

D. Members of the Christ Church Choir participate as “lab choir” in one of Eastman’s Sacred Music Skills courses. They provide “real world” experience that is essential for contextual teaching.

Our collaborations and partnerships with the Rochester Area Community Foundation consists of The Roy E. VanDelinder, Jr. Fellowship Program at Christ Church Rochester

 

This exciting program offers vocational training and practical application in liturgical music skills for Eastman organ students who are pursuing a career in liturgical music. Fellows receive a scholarship for participating in this program, and a large cash prize is awarded each year to the Fellow who demonstrates the greatest diligence and achievement. Under the leadership of Music Director Stephen Kennedy, fellows receive training and experience in improvising, composing, arranging, hymn playing, anthem and motet accompaniment, chanting, conducting, and rehearsing choirs and instrumentalists. They also receive formation in the Episcopal Church, encouragement to be actively engaged in our parish community, and receive support from our church family.

Fellowship in Liturgical Organ Studies

The VanDelinder Committee selects the fellows based on their résumé, playing skills, and two letters of recommendation. Fellows receive a scholarship for the academic year. Fellows may participate in this program for up to three years but the VanDelinder Committee makes the selection of fellows each year.  

 

Prize in Liturgical Organ Skills

Each year, the VanDelinder Committee selects one acting fellow to receive the Roy E. VanDelinder, Jr. Prize in Liturgical Organ Skills that includes a large cash prize above the scholarship.

 

DESCRIPTION OF PARISH ENSEMBLES:

 

Christ Church Choir: This ensemble’s principal function is to sing for the 11:00 a.m. Sunday Eucharist. This auditioned choir builds upon a tradition of musical quality through a broad variety of musical styles. Repertoire includes Gregorian Chant, Anglican Chant, and motets from the Renaissance to the 21st century. Membership is drawn from parishioners of Christ Church as well as individuals from the Rochester community. Fellowship is also an important aspect of the choir. We are all grateful to Carlos Mercado for his tireless and essential work as CC Choir Librarian over the past many years.  Members names listed at the end of this document.

 

The Christ Church Youth Ensemble: This ensemble has grown to be larger than ever. The ensemble performs music in the 11:00 a.m. Eucharist on third Sundays of the month. Members learn traditional music of the Episcopal Church, sacred chant, hymns of the church, sacred motets, music reading skills, play instruments, and enjoy fellowship. VanDelinder Fellows direct the ensemble under the mentorship of the Music Director. Rehearsals are from 12:25 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. each Sunday. We thank all members and parents of this ensemble. Members are: Hope McGuckin, Hanna and Liza Sommers; Asa, Benny, Clinton, Liam, and Reagan Smith; and Alex and Eva Zanibbi.

 

The Christ Church Consort: Made up of parish members, Eastman School of Music students, RPO members, and professional musicians who play Renaissance and Baroque instruments. Instruments presently include gut-string violin, viola, violoncello, and sackbut (Renaissance trombone). Players are exposed to the traditions of the Episcopal Church and learn historic performance practice methods by performing early music repertoire with Christ Church ensembles and the Baroque organ. Players are: Aika Ito, Baroque Violin; Noah Fields, Baroque Viola, Ben David Aronson, Tenor Sackbut, and Glenna Curren, Baroque Cello.

 

Schola Cantorum: “The coolest, most unusual music experience in the city….” Rochester Magazine’s “Our Top Picks of 2014.” “The Christ Church Schola Cantorum … sings beautifully.” Fanfare, Jan/Feb 2010. The Christ Church Schola Cantorum was founded in 1997 by Stephen Kennedy for the purpose of performing the weekly Office of Compline at Christ Church. The intent was to provide a service to the community in which musical art and liturgy were seamlessly interwoven. Since its inception, the Schola has performed the Office of Compline each Sunday evening from October through April. This critically acclaimed ensemble also functions as an early music laboratory through engagement in known historic rehearsal and performance practices. The Schola specializes in Gregorian chant, choral music from the Renaissance and Baroque eras, and choral improvisation. Special thanks goes to Thatcher Lyman, Christ Church Music Scholar, for his assistant directorship, and to Christopher Huebner, Schola Librarian and Coordinator for the Schola. Members names listed at the end of this document.

 

Associate Organists

We are grateful to David Higgs and William Porter for contributing so generously of their talent and support to our parish and its music program.  They also help with mentoring and teaching our parish musicians and VanDelinder Fellows. We thank them for their ongoing support.

 

Members of the Christ Church Choir

 

Soprano

Pru Kirkpatrick

Kristy Liddell

Carol Manuel

Lisa Pigut

Hanna Sommers

Liza Sommers

Mary Anne Wickett

Madeleine Woodworth

 

Alto

Joan Hunt

Schultz Mary

Eleanor Peet

Jiaqi Shao

Sonja Shelton

Lydia Worboys

 

Tenor

David Kirkpatrick

Bruce Manuel

Benjamin Henderson

Thatcher Lyman

Carlos Mercado

Alden Wright

 

Bass

Benjamin Doane

John Kirkpatrick

Kyle Liddell

Steven Metcalfe

Evan Ritter

Adam Sadberry

 

Members of the Schola Cantorum

 

Soprano

Ava D'Agostino

Lydia Becker

Hana J. Cai

Glenna Curren

Meg Cutting

Kat Ekaterina Gorlova

Katie Harmer

Sarah McConnell

Amanda Mole

Jiaqi Shao (portative organ)

Amy Steinberg

Madeleine Woodworth

 

Alto/Countertenor

Daniel Guerola Benito

Nick Bulgarino (alto sackbut)

Naomi Gregory (organ)

Aika ito (historic violin)

Marc Laroussini

Professor Honey Meconi

Julian Petrallia

Owen Reid

Lydia Worboys

 

Tenor

Ben David Aronson (Tenor sackbut)

Daniel Chang

Benjamin Henderson

Chase Loomer

Thatcher Lyman (Assistant director

David Marshall

Chris Petit

Alden Wright

 

Bass

Lisa Albrecht (bass sackbut)

Mark Ballard

Oliver Brett (organ)

Noah Fields (and historic Viola)

Carl Galland

Aaron James

Benjamin Johns

John Kirkpatrick

Professor Michael E Ruhling

 

Christopher Huebner (Librarian and coordinator)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

For more information about concerts and music events, please visit the Christ Church website: http://christchurchrochester.org/index.html.

 

 

Here are just a few ways in which Christ Church members and friends may participate in our initiative:

• Becoming an Usher/Candle-lighter for Compline on Sunday Nights

• Make contributions to our Friends of Music Fund. This fund supports music at Christ Church.  It also enables us to provide musical outreach to the Rochester community through music training programs, concerts, and enables us to enhance our liturgies with music.  

• Purchase our various CD recordings for friends and family members as gifts.

• Assist in publicizing music at Christ Church by helping sending emails to the local media

 

Please contact me if you are interested in participating in any aspect of our music program at Christ Church. Stephen Kennedy, Music Director stephenk@rochester.rr.com

 

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“Tuesday Pipes” at Christ Church: Every Tuesday, Eastman performers, faculty, and alumni will present a 25-minute lunchtime concert at Christ Church. Performances showcase the Craighead-Saunders Organ and Hook & Hastings Organ. Events begin at 12:10pm and are free and open to the public. For more information on the Tuesday Pipes series, please visit http://www.esm.rochester.edu/organ/events/

 

 

 

 

For more information about concerts and music events, please visit the Christ Church website: 

http://www.christchurchrochester.org/

You can also find the billboard of ongoing and special future events by going to the top of this section and clicking on the link "MUSIC GALLERY".

Here are just a few ways in which Christ Church members and friends may participate in our program:

• Becoming an Usher/Candle-lighter for Compline

• Make contributions to our Friends of Music Fund. This fund supports music at Christ Church.  It also enables us to provide musical outreach to the Rochester community through music-training programs, concerts, and enables us to enhance our liturgies with music.  

• Purchase our various CD recordings for friends and family members as gifts.

• Assist in publicizing music at Christ Church by helping sending emails to the local media

 

Please contact me if you are interested in participating in any aspect of our music program at Christ Church. Stephen Kennedy, Music Director stephenk@rochester.rr.com

 

You may also support our music education and enrichment opportunities for young musicians who are dedicating their lives to the field of sacred music by contributing to Christ Church’s "Friends of Music" fund.

Please continue to follow the musical life of our parish by reading the monthly Music Notes and Calendar that are emailed from my address  via MailChimp. 

-Click on the posters below for a full page view.

<img src="https://static1.squarespace.com/static/563e5edae4b08370349673aa/t/5887ced39f74566f92a1b53c/1485295326160/" />

The music sound files contained here are from the new CD recordings that have just been released. These recordings are available for purchase by clicking the link below. The music used in this publication is edited.  

http://www.christchurchrochester.org/recordings-cd-shop

 

Other links of interest are:

https://www.facebook.com/ccscholacantorum/?fref=ts

https://www.facebook.com/ChristChurchRochester/?fref=ts

http://www.christchurchrochester.org

 

Please click on the word "TOP" just below. It will take you back to the top of the opening page. From there please click on the words in the upper right side of the page to explore additional articles, news and events. There is also a photo gallery and many other wonderful things to see. The links are called:

"SONG"   "NEWS & EVENTS"  CHAPEL GALLERY"  MUSIC EVENT GALLERY"  "CONTACT"    "ARCHIVE"

The "CONTACT" page is also a place to leave comments or requests. The "ARCHIVE" page will show you past issues. 

Trevor Eckart © 2017

 Renate Eckart won a juror award from the Rochester Art Club for her painting, "A quiet afternoon".

Renate Eckart won a juror award from the Rochester Art Club for her painting, "A quiet afternoon".

EVENTS

 

EVENTS and ANNOUNCEMENTS in This Issue

 

Candlelight Concert with Compline

a Memory of Michelle Stanley by her daughter Alexandra

R.A.I.H.N.

Pittsford Food Cupboard

ANNUAL MEETING from January 23, 2017

From the Archives 

 

a Memory of Michelle Stanley by her daughter Alexandra

Shared by Mary Schultz, Michelle's mother

20 years ago I entered this world into the arms of my mom, my dad, and all the amazing family that surrounded me then and still surrounds me now, especially today. But never did I know the abundance of love I would receive, and the person that I would become because of that love and all else that my mom taught me.

You fought a long, hard battle Mom, but you always managed to have a smile on your face. It was never about you, only about making sure that everyone else was taken care of before yourself. You held on for so long, and we know that it was just because you were worried about leaving us behind. But we will be ok because of the person you were and the people you helped us all to become. You gave everyone such special memories and pieces of you to hold onto. You gave me the best 5 siblings, an amazing dad, and the rest of your family and friends to remember you, love you, and laugh with forever. And I know you'll be up there watching us all grow up into the people you showed us, with your love, how to become.

This isn't easy, and it never will be. But Mom, the person you were and the friendships you created for yourself and for all of us are what makes it a little easier. There are endless stories to share and happy memories to dwell on. You were full of so much love and had such a strong faith, and every person that you touched in your 44 years could feel it. There will be hard times for sure. I will miss waking up to the smell of pancakes and blueberry sauce cooking, and I'll miss sending you pictures of my outfit so you can tell me how to make it better. And I'll think of you every time I smell lavender lotion, the leaves candle, when I'm sitting on the beach and it's just the perfect weather, when "My Wish" comes on the radio, or when someone talks about why dunkin' donuts coffee is the best. But there will be good times too. Like when I get to tell people where I learned to cook so well, when I get to tell my kids why I love birthdays so much, and when I get to tell my kids, and everyone, that everything I do right with them is because of you.

The past few years have been hard, and I know they were much harder for you than you let yourself show. You're the strongest person I know, and we all have peace of mind knowing that you are in a much better place and painless now. You used to always say to me, "you'll be all grown up and I'll still be worrying about you, I'll still be watching over you." I'm holding you to that one now mom!! I love you to the moon and back!!

 

Alexandra Stanley, Mary Schultz's granddaughter,  wrote this on her Facebook page on the evening after her mother died. 

 

R.A.I.H.N.

It's the giving season and time to reflect on why we give. Please let us remind you of all the wonderful reasons to choose RAIHN as the recipient of your end-of-year generosity: 

  • I love the bus drivers. They are really nice! (2016 family) 
  • I loved the RAIHN program. I just loved the staff and volunteers, as they really helped my family stay together during this tough time. (2016 family) 
  • I learned to save more money, share with others, and communicate. (2016 family) 
  • It is a great program. I like the fact that we were welcomed. We felt at home. (2016 family) 
  • RAIHN is here to help you, not carry you. (2015 family)
  •  You were the light at one of the darkest chapters of my family's life. Your kindness and encouragement has stayed with us to this day. (email received in 2016 from a 2012 family) 
  • Getting into RAIHN is like getting the golden ticket! (community case worker)

Please check your mail for the Annual Appeal letter. This is scheduled to hit mailboxes shortly after Thanksgiving. We truly appreciate your support as we assist homeless families to achieve sustainable independence by supporting them with tailored services, including shelter, food, personalized case management and a diverse network of caring volunteers. 

BTW - doing the dinner on Sunday was such an enjoyable time. These families are a joy to be with! (email from First Universalist meal coordinator) 

Please remember RAIHN when doing your holiday shopping! Click on the images above for AmazonSmile or GoodShop. By linking your accounts and selecting RAIHN as your chosen recipient, a portion of your purchase will be donated to RAIHN! 

RAIHN 34 Meigs St. 

Rochester, NY 14607

585-506-9050   

 Baptism ©2005 T. Jutsum

Baptism ©2005 T. Jutsum

PLEASE HELP FILL THE FOOD CUPBOARD BASKET

The Pittsford Food Cupboard supplies over 4,000 households totaling over 9,400 people.  They provide food and other items to 6 different zip codes:  E Rochester, Pittsford, Brighton and 3 in Rochester.  Some items they are always in need of:

  • Pasta and pasta sauce
  • Canned fruits and vegetables
  • Hearty soups and tuna
  • Cereals

The items are dropped off to the food cupboard once a month.  The volunteers are always so appreciative. Thank you Christ Church for helping to fill the basket that is in the back of the church every Sunday.

 

Christ Church Annual Meeting Reports

REPORTS on Christ Church Programs and Volunteer Opportunities

Along with pledging, the donation of one’s time to parish organizations and working groups has a tremendous impact on the vitality of the church. Below you’ll see a list of all the groups and tasks working at Christ Church. Groups with a crucial need are listed first, but all the groups welcome new volunteers. Please read the list and see what might match your interests and skills!

CHANCEL CREW – Acolyte, Crucifer, Subdeacon, Thurifer, Verger

At all celebrations of the Liturgy, it is fitting that the principal celebrant, whether bishop or priest, be assisted by other priests, and by deacons and lay persons.” (BCP, 322 & 354).  When serving at the altar, members of the chancel team are fulfilling those directions of the Book of Common Prayer. We are aware that the purpose of assisting at the altar is “that God may be glorified.” We currently have twelve member to cover seventeen assignments each month.  Although we would like each person to only have to serve once a month, several members are doing double and triple duty.  Training as to what to do as well as why we do it will be provided at your convenience.  Please contact me or the Rector if you wish to explore this service to our parish and to God.  --Jim Bement, 585.734.5756, jhbement@rochester.rr.com

      CRUCIAL NEED: help on altar crew on 2nd, 3rd, or 4th Sundays

THE SONG - Christ Church newsletter- Val Jutsum

The SONG is the Christ Church digital newsletter, has just had it’s first anniversary, and is available to view at songforchristchurch.org .  The SONG publishes a new issue corresponding with the Seasons of the church year, rather than monthly, but, due to its online nature, is updated frequently during the time each issue is current.  Typically, each issue features articles by Ruth, our rector, and Stephen Kennedy, our music director, highlighting relevant topics and events, parish and music, activities taking place at Christ Church, financial and vestry news, messages from parishioners, as well as, original art. The SONG has past issues available to view in the archive section, a place to contact us, and a way to pay your pledge or simply donate using a credit card. The number of people, who have looked at some or all of the SONG, can be seen below.   Feb 2016- Jan. 2017

   Total: Visits        Page Views        Audience Size

            1,510                3,273            1,121

 avg 125 monthly        avg 272 monthly        avg 93 monthly

My crucial need right now is for those numbers to be higher by having more people visit the site more often, for more people to submit things to share with the parish, and for 1 volunteer to help make a text only issue, monthly, if a significant number of things have been added or subtracted, to send to the office for printing and mailing for those parishioners who do not own a computer.

COMMUNICATION COMMITTEE

CRUCIAL NEED: This committee doesn’t yet exist and this is our greatest current need at Christ Church. We don’t have an official group that plans and monitors our communications about the church. Activities this group might undertake include regularly reviewing flyers, contacting media or issuing press releases for special events, tracking hits and monitoring content on our website, reviewing our FB page and developing a presence on other social media, and in general work on making sure the Rochester community is aware of our activities, and that our communications about our activities are up to date and accurate.  

FOYERS – Deb VanderBilt

Foyers is a national initiative of the Episcopal church that gives congregations a way to gather in small groups for fellowship. Groups of 3-4 “units” (6-8 people if couples sign up) are set up in March and meet from April – October, meeting in each group member’s home once for a simple dinner. It’s a wonderful way to meet new people in the church.

CRUCIAL NEED: I’ve been setting up the Foyers groups for 7 years, and with my position as Warden I would like someone else to take over the coordinating of the groups. It takes about 4 hours of time in the month of March, and all you need is a computer.

RAIHN (Rochester Area Interfaith Hospitality Network) – Beatrice Deshommes

RAIHN in an interfaith organization. Its mission is to help homeless families become independent by providing shelter, food and case management.  Community churches provide housing and/or volunteers to support this ministry. Christ Church doesn’t host directly, but we help staff the weeks that our fellow downtown church St. Luke’s and St. Simon’s hosts the guests.  Christ Church currently has six active volunteers participating in RAIHN. There are three times to volunteer: cooking dinner (5-7), hospitality (7-9:30), overnight (9:30 p.m. to when guests leave the next morning, usually around 7 a.m.).

Please go to  www.raihn.org for more information and contact Beatrice at 585-880-7029 for information on becoming a Christ Church RAIHN volunteer.

CRUCIAL NEED: RAIHN is in need of more volunteers to help sustain this ministry: the need is greatest in hospitality (7-9:30 p.m.) RAIHN weeks occur quarterly (every 13 weeks or so).

MUSIC PROGRAM – Stephen Kennedy ( complete report is in Stephen's Music Notes )

Goals from 2016 (ongoing in 2017)

1. Attract more people to Christ Church through our music program Goal on target

2. Raise the level of musicianship in CC ensembles Goal on target

3. Raise community awareness of our rich and diverse music program Goal on target

4. Foster the education and training of musicians in liturgical music skills Goal on target

5. Engage people from the larger community (non parishioners) to help fund

our music program Goal on target

6. Install professional microphones in the church to record CC Choir,

Youth Ensemble, Consort, CC liturgies, and concerts Not yet reached

7. Provide more opportunities for youth participation and involvement in

Liturgies through music Goal on target

8. Enhance the church’s acoustic in light of the Chancel repair & renovation Goal attained

9. Fundraising to support our parish music program Goal on target

10. Strengthen existing community collaborations and partnerships in Music Goal on target

 

Opportunities for individuals to assist and contribute in our parish music program:

1. Compline ushers and Candle-lighters

2. Greeters at Tuesday Pipes to represent the parish

3. Volunteers to help send publicity to media via e-mail

4. Additional Youth Ensemble members

5. Additional Christ Church Choir members

6. People to help set up for Compline following the 11:00 a.m. Eucharist

7. People to assist in grant writing

 

A MEAL AND MORE Annual Report 2017- Lois Jones

 

A Meal and More served its first meals in 1979 and has continually feed the Downtown Rochester community for 37 years. Originally our mission was to serve our new senior citizen neighbors at Manhattan Square and people from the neighborhood by inviting them to Sunday lunch. However, we quickly realized the amount of Urban hunger far outweighed Christ Church’s monetary and people resources, necessitating developing with the Bishop and other Downtown parishes a sustainable feeding mission for our Downtown community. In 1984, Meal and More was incorporated as a Type B Not for Profit Corporation which provided it two very important tax considerations: exemption from federal income taxes and tax deductibility for contributions. Lunch on Wednesday was added and for the last 6 years, 85 – 100 (+ or -) meals each day have been served. 

 

For A Meal and More to have provided a sustained feeding mission for 37 years has taken commitment, cooperation and effort on the part of:

Christ Church – provides “In Kind Services”: kitchen, Wilder Hall, the utilities       (lights, heat, water) and Sexton and Secretarial services

A Meal and More Board -coordinates everything, seeks funds, files reports, identifies volunteers and coordinates volunteer efforts, hires staff, keeps accurate records for government agencies

Volunteers -- serve meals, contribute food stuffs, clean up, help prepare meals, perform special projects (Christmas Bags)

Chef – creates menus, orders from FoodLink, prepares meals, maintains Kitchen, etc.

Set Up/Break Down/Dishwasher – sets up & breaks down, does all the dishes, etc. 

Greeter and Security – maintains records, maintains decorum, maintains safety, etc.

9134 meals were served by Meal and More during 2016

The Elderly are a very consistent presence between 150 and 200 meals are served to them every month.

Approximately 25 meals per month are served to Children with more being served in the summer

Adults – make up our largest group with approximately 650 meals are served to this group each month. 

This year, including Christmas Day, our Mission has been carried out by:

Allen Callarame – Chef, Dave Jencek – Set up/Break Down/Dish Washer,

William Drayton – Greeter/Security

 

CRUCIAL NEED: Desserts, Dressings and Donations.

To volunteer contact Kristy Liddell at kristy.m.liddell@gmail.com or see her at church. 

“1 in 6 Americans is food insecure” Howard Buffett, 40 Ways to Feed a Hungry World

 

GARDEN – Deb VanderBilt

Our garden is a jewel in the East End. Many people hang out there, walk their dogs, or play with their kids there and when we are working we always get complements on it. For a big place, it does not take that much work. There is a garden committee of Christ Church members and Sagamore (the building across the street) residents who plans and fundraises for the garden. We schedule “big” work days in Spring and Fall—for spring cleanup and fall leaf raking, and in the summer we depend on volunteer gardeners to stay on top of the weeds.

CRUCIAL NEED: We do need more people to volunteer to work in the garden. In the summer we try to assign a small portion to each person to be responsible for—half of one bed, for example, and ask that you weed it every 2 weeks. If we have a lot of volunteers, it’s very manageable, but becomes overwhelming when we have too few. So can you count you in as a caretaker for a small portion of the garden in Summer 2017?  

USHERS – Hugh Kierig

The Usher Program at Christ Church is a vital part of the Sunday service experience by assisting both clergy and congregants.  Just as important, Ushers serve as the welcoming face to both parishioners and visitors at our services.  Each Usher is asked to serve one Sunday service per month and one fifth Sunday per year.  Additionally, Ushers serve at special services such as funerals, ordinations, 12th Night, and other major events.    If you would like to be an Usher, please let one of the other Ushers know.  

 

CRUCIAL NEED: We are always looking for volunteers to serve in this vital position, but it is especially important to have four ushers on each Sunday, 16 total so no one has to usher more than once a month. As the list of current ushers shows, we are three ushers short.

8 am service: Ron Vukman, Alan & Lois Jones, Norm Geil

11 am service:

Doris Bailey-Gordon Cecilia Brereton Renate Eckart Tom Foster

            Monae Howard Hugh Kierig Tony Kingsley Spencer Koehl

            Bill Soleim Joe McCutchon Spenser McGuckin Shirley Ricker

          Carl Vogt

-----------------------------------------

ALTAR GUILD – Bill Soleim

The Altar Guild is a group of men and women who works mostly behind the scenes to prepare for services on Sunday. Our ministry involves caring for the vestments, vessels, and altar linens of Christ Church. We usually work in pairs to set up for Sunday’s services at 9:30 on Saturday morning (for about 1 hour). After the 11:00 service, we take about 15 minutes to wash and put away vestments and communion vessels. We each serve one a week per month, but many of us also work together on Christmas and Easter to decorate the sanctuary. We are always looking for volunteers, since a larger team means each person does less work. If you think you would enjoy serving God and our congregation in this quiet ministry, please contact Bill Soleim (482-8745)

ANGEL TREES – Eleanor Peet

This outreach program is the collection of Christmas gifts for the women clients, and their families, of the Willow Domestic Violence Center (formerly known as Alternatives for Battered Women). The Center provides us with a wish list. Paper Angels with suggestions written on them decorate two trees that are placed in the sanctuary and the Guild Room each December. Parishioners take an angel or two and bring their gifts unwrapped back to church to be brought to the Center mid-December.  Willow Center says: “over 70% of domestic violence crimes are witnessed by children. A simple gesture of providing new toys during their stay can give a child in crisis a sense of normalcy and hope.”

 

BIRTHDAY CARDS - Lois Jones

Each of us has one day during the year which we call our own and celebrate in special ways. It is our BIRTHDAY. Your Christ Church Family wants each of us to know how unique, special and valued you are, not only on your birthday but every day. So we send you a birthday card to remind you we are thinking of you and wishing you God’s blessings. “God danced the day you were born”

Please make sure your birth month and day are listed in the Church Office.

 

CAPITAL CAMPAIGN REPORT – Joe Schaller

A steering committee of vestry members, including the rector, was formed in September, 2016 to determine if there is a need for a capital campaign, and if so, to recommend to the Vestry the next steps.  A capital campaign is not limited to raising money for capital projects/repair.  It would include, at minimum, the establishment of a capital reserve fund, debt reduction, planned giving, grants and a fund for mission outreach.  Furthermore, it has a great spiritual value as it will sharpen the focus of our members on the Christian ideals and principles, including stewardship, which enriches our lives and which brings the light of Christ into a troubled world.

The committee met several times, including conducting interviews with 4 consulting firms.  In addition, there were numerous follow-up phone calls and email correspondence with all the candidates.  Based on the information gathering and interviews the committee determined that a campaign would benefit Christ Church and for it to be successful a consulting firm should be hired.  The committee recommend, and the Vestry approved, at their January 17, 2017 meeting that James D. Klote & Associates, a nationwide consulting firm, be contracted to assist us to conduct a feasibility study and capital campaign with a fee of $56,000. Klote and Associates has an outstanding track record of fundraising successes with many Episcopal churches including recently in Rochester, Ithaca and Cortland.

More details on a campaign are too numerous for the purposes of this report, but will be shared with the congregation over the next few months.  Please know that it would fully engage each of us and would be conducted in a prayerful and completely open and transparent manner.

CARE TEAM – Kevin Finnigan

The Care Team is on “life support” due to the fact that many of the volunteers listed are no longer available.  Several attempts to bring this situation to the attention of the congregation have been unsuccessful.  It is the hope that the new year will see a revitalization of this ministry.

COFFEE HOUR – Vicki McCutchon

Coffee hour allows for people to mingle and catch up with one another and to also meet and greet visitors.  Our team is made up of Meg Mackey, Elizabeth Dugdale, The McCallums, Christine Hill and myself.  During coffee hour people visit, but they are also able to take part in other efforts that groups are working at CC.  Gifts can be put under the tree for the Giving Tree, items for School #9 can be dropped off, and Sanctuary Movement opportunities are highlighted by Lucie.  It is also just a nice time to enjoy some tasty treats!  The coffee hour crew also helps out with the Annual Meeting lunch and we helped with the reception between RoCo and the art installation in memory of Sarah Collins.

FINANCE – Norm Geil

The Christ Church Finance Committee has the responsibility in conjunction with the Vestry, Treasurer and Rector, to oversee the financial condition and well-being of the parish.  It makes recommendations to the Vestry on all financial matters deemed appropriate by the Committee or requested by the Vestry including among other activities:  preparing an annual budget; monitoring investments and operating expenses and income; arranging for audits; and providing a report for the annual parish meeting.  At present the Committee’s members include Meg Mackey, Josie Dewey, Kathy Brennan, Ron Vukman and Norm Geil.

FORUM (Sunday mornings) – Mary Vukman

The Forum is a small, informal discussion group that meets on Sunday mornings 9:45-10:45 in the Guild Room. The Forum began the year reading the Acts of the Apostles and doing a few short topics, but for most of the year we have been studying the "Farewell Discourse" in John's gospel, in which Jesus tries to prepare his disciples for what lies ahead for them when he is gone.  We are currently in John Chapter 17.  For upcoming topics, we are considering a book about Revelation or the Dead Sea Scrolls or the Qumran community or a book by John Lennox (Oxford mathematician, philosopher of science, and Christian apologist) or a book by Rodney Stark (an American sociologist who analyzes the interactions between the Church and society in historical settings).  Feel free to drop in now and then or to join us every week.

JAZZ FESTIVAL – Carlos Mercado

2016 was the eighth year that Christ Church was a venue for the Xerox International Jazz Festival, and the seventh year that we hosted the Made in the UK Series in cooperation with the UK Arts Council.  With some 7,000 people passing through our doors over nine days, this is perhaps the largest community activity of the parish each year.  Over these years we have become the largest gathering of British jazz musicians in the world outside of the UK itself, and Christ Church has earned a golden reputation in British jazz circles and among local jazz fans for its hospitality, the quality of this venue, and the good spirit of the event.  It is one of the most significant opportunities for Christ Church to showcase its building and the hospitality of its people to an international crowd.   This year we mourn the untimely death of our wonderful liaison from London, John Elson, who died of a heart attack only a few weeks after we bid him good bye “until next year.”  Our committee sent a donation in his name to the British Heart Fund.  While 2017 will not be the same without him, we look forward to another successful year as one of Rochester’s great jazz hotspots! Jazz Fest team: Bruce & Patti Blaine, Vickie & Joe McCutchon, Carlos Mercado.

 

LECTORS AND INTERCESSORS (PRAYERS OF THE PEOPLE) – Kevin Finnigan

Lectors read the lessons on Sundays, and Intercessors read the prayers on Sundays when they are not sung. We have added new lectors and intercessors to the roster since last year.  In addition, lectors are receiving a reminder the week prior to the Sunday they are to read reminding them to arrange for a substitute, if need be, and informing them of the reading that they are to read. Intercessors are likewise being notified prior to the Sunday they are to lead the Prayers of the People.

MEALS FOR NEW MOMS AND DADS – Vicki McCutchon 

This outreach is near and dear to me.  It was over 25 years ago that Mary Vuckman presented us with a delicious meal that fed us for 2 days.  A smiling face, tasty food and a feeling of belonging was wonderful and that is why we continue to do this for new parents.  This has been a busy year for meals, which is AWESOME!  Everyone so enjoys putting a meal together for new parents, because we all know how it is to be tired, thrilled, but a bit overwhelmed…..a home cooked meal is just the ticket!

PARISH LIFE – Kevin Finnigan

This has been a very busy year for the Parish Life Team.   Salient events include Twelfth Night Service, Shrove Tuesday meal, various weddings, Jazz Festival, and Advent Lessons and Carols.  Christ Church members also take on the responsibility of writing personal notes to parishioners who are celebrating their birthdays and to those who are ill and/or in the hospital and to tending to the needs of the bereaved.

PROPERTY COMMITTEE – Hugh Kierig

The Property Committee is charged with the responsibility of maintaining the buildings that comprise our Church.  As Church is made up of buildings that are over 125 years old, this can be quite a challenge.  With the assistance of our valued Sexton, Moses Roland, and the good work of the Finance Committee in preparing and receiving outside capital grants, the Committee has been very busy this past year.  Major activities of the Committee have included:

 

• Repair to the cages that protect our beautiful Tiffany windows;

• A major repair to the roof over the north aisle that will prevent future snow melt infiltration into the Nave and better roof drainage;

• Repair of the fallen ceiling over the north aisle;

• Repair of the roof over the sacristy;

• Replacement of lights in the Nave and Narthex chandeliers;

• And in case you didn’t notice, plaster repair and repainting of the Narthex and Chancel.

 

Additionally, to make these repair work and not disrupt activities within the Church, the Committee coordinated work with the clergy, Eastman School of Music administration, our architect at Bero Architecture, and various contractors.  The Committee held coordinating meetings weekly with these stakeholders.  The Committee also coordinated meetings with two local architects to look at possible repurposing of our buildings and worked with Bero Architects on the planning and construction documents for the repair to the Lawn Street façade.  Finally, the Committee is working to prioritize future general maintenance needs of the Church.  Property Committee Members – Josie Dewey, Alan Jones, John Fields, Hugh Kierig, Tony Kingsley.

 

QUILTERS – Ann Piato

We have presented 26 handmade quilts to newly baptized members as they join Christ Church, 24 for infants and 2 for adults. We also made the quilt hanging in the hallway in honor of the 150th anniversary of the founding of the Church. Lucy Alonzo and Marianne Sickles received quilts in honor of their service to Christ Church, and we made a quilt for Ruth Ferguson to honor her first year as our rector (with pieces of fabric donated by the congregation). The quilters of Christ Church are Eleanor Peet, Ann Piato and Pat Kingsley

SANCTUARY AT CHRIST CHURCH – Lucie Parfitt

Sanctuary at Christ Church is a new Outreach effort at Christ Church. Our mission is to share ways that Christ Church and its parishioners can act and engage in the community and the world. Initially, we hope to partner with local organizations to provide vital support to vulnerable groups, such as immigrants, migrant workers, and those who may be at risk of deportation. Long term, the Sanctuary group at Christ Church would like to provide shelter for any and all who feel unsafe or at risk of deportation in the coming years. For now, we hope to build our community at Christ Church and offer a platform to volunteer and work together. We invite everyone in the parish to get involved and join our Google Group and Facebook group for updates.

SCHOOL #9 – Vicki McCutchon

School #9 is the largest bilingual elementary school in the RCSD and it continues to grow on a daily basis.  Many of its students are new to the USA and are not equipped or do not understand the ways of the school. By helping out with some of the schools programs, we try to help the student have a pleasant experience at their new school.  Patti Blaine and Vicki McCutchon have helped organize school kit, coat, children’s underclothing and uniform drives.  The outpouring of donations from CC is overwhelming and #9 counselors cannot thank us enough.  Patti also coordinates a volunteer program to help with the reading program at #9 and she is also involved in a mentor program for the older students at the school who are getting ready to move onto middle school.  

STEWARDSHIP – Gale Lynch

The Stewardship Committee just completed the 2016 campaign which focused on having small group, in-home dinner discussions.  We disseminated the information we collected via the Sunday service bulletin as well as a display on the bulletin board by the drinking fountain.  The number of pledge cards submitted will be announced at the Annual Meeting. 

SUNDAY SCHOOL & YOUTH GROUP – Gale Lynch  

Since October, St. John Fisher freshman Emily Brennan has been working in the Sunday School room presenting Bible-based lessons, activities and crafts to the kids.  Attendance ranges from two to six kids. Please help spread the word that we are back to offering Sunday School of substance!  Youth Group continues to meet once a month on Friday nights from 6:30 - 9:00 p.m.  Emily Brennan leads Youth Group as well, and Gale Lynch arranges parents to volunteer as the "adult on call".  This is a small critical mass of youth who get together for fun each month

TELLERS – Deb VanderBilt

The tellers count the money received from the offering every week. No math skills needed—we use calculators. What you need is the ability to stay after the service until 1:30 or 2:00 without dying of hunger. At present tellers are fully staffed.

TUESDAY BOOK GROUP – Ron Hilton

The Tuesday morning worship and study group is one of the older functions of Christ Church, having been begun by Fr. Bud Thurston.  After years of meeting at 7:30 am, we chose in March to shift to 9:00 a.m.  We have added two new members and are eager to welcome a few more.  On first and second Tuesdays Ruth celebrates Holy Communion for us, and on the other Tuesdays, Mary Ann Wickett provides Morning Prayer.  We tend to study fairly serious books, but have been known to read a novel occasionally.  The criterion seems to be that of religion or spirituality, although we are now nearing the end of Yuval Noah Harari's Sapiens:  A Brief history of Humankind.  I should add that we always have treats after the worship service as we begin the study activity.

WEDDINGS – Vicki McCutchon

2016 CC hosted fewer weddings than in the past two years--4 weddings, due to the incredible interior painting that was happening in Summer 2016.  In 2015 there were 11 weddings and in 2014 there were 14 weddings.  For 2017 we already have 7 weddings booked and we are hoping to cap off at 12.  This is a significant source of revenue for the church: 7 weddings will bring in $11,900 in 2017.  All these weddings could not take place and run smoothly without the great team of Marianne, Moses, Stephen and Lydia [and Vicki! –editor’s note!].  Thank you to all for all of your time, energy and expertise.

The top three ways couples find us are by coming to Compline, Jazz Fest or attending a friend or relative’s wedding at CC.  People love how accommodating we are, the incredible music and our beautiful garden and interior for their wedding photos.

REPORT ON DIOCESAN ANNUAL CONVENTION - Mary Pietrzykowski

It was still dark as Deb Vanderbilt and I set out on what felt to me like a pilgrimage to our Diocesan Convention.  Pilgrimage is defined as a journey or search of moral or spiritual significance, and for me, as a former Catholic, preparing for, and participating in dialogue and decision making regarding the life of our church, is indeed a sacred experience.  I was eager to attend the liturgy at Trinity Church and to see and hear Michael Curry, our Presiding Bishop.

Extending the pilgrimage metaphor, we gathered at Hobart Smith and then walked to Trinity Church for the liturgy.  Our theme for song and praise was "Seeing the Face of God in Each Other."  We were a joyful, expectant group, on a journey toward celebration of our identity as the Episcopal branch of the Jesus movement.

Michael Curry is a powerful speaker.  His voice is deep and rich and his preaching style is reminiscent of the Southern Baptist tradition.  He is deeply serious about communicating our responsibility to love and care for our brothers and sisters.  He is deeply serious, but never overbearing.  As we listened, he eloquently laced his message with humor.  He demonstrated that he understands the way to hearts as well as minds requires a varied approach.

After the service, the convention got down to business. The main items were Grace Church Lyons changing from a parish to a mission church which will partner with Rural & Migrant Ministry; dissolving St. Paul’s, Montour Falls as a parish and having St. James Watkins Glen take over administration of its parish hall; passing the proposed diocesan budget with the addition of a $900 HRA for retirees; and some minor canon revisions, including shortening the time before convention when diocesan committee nominees have to send in (shortened because of email making it easier to do).

As Deb and I drove home in the early evening, talking about the day, our families and books we were reading, I was reminded that this pilgrimage wasn't over.  If the day meant anything, it meant continuing to step out each morning, looking for, and finding, the face of God in each other.

Christ Church Vestry Minutes

December Vestry Minutes

Rector’s Report:  Ruth reflected that the past month has been full of all things liturgical, spiritual, and political. We celebrated another Advent Lessons and Carols under Kevin Finnegan’s leadership and the Youth Ensemble gave us a glorious dramatic interpretation of the Gospel the last Sunday in Advent.  The formation of Sanctuary at Christ Church has become a venue for parishioners to engage at the local and global level to help the vulnerable as Church. Ruth feels new sense of clarity as priest, perhaps even urgency: the atmosphere of hatred combined with fears for the economic, social, and even physical security of certain individuals and groups in our nation has drawn her into a more active engagement with social and climate justice issues. She emphasized that when we work for justice, we work not as Republicans or Democrats but as Christians.

She also thanked everyone who donated to Standing Rock through St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in Fort Yates, ND.  Christ Church gave just under $500.00, and the money has been used primarily for firewood, propane and gas, but other things as well. Firewood is extremely important not only in the cold of winter but also the sacred fires of Oceti Sakowin and the other camps must not burn out. Buying firewood is difficult and expensive because locals (racists, pro-DAPL, or both) do not like to sell to natives, so one must travel far and long to buy it. Fr. Floberg makes sure he always brings firewood to the camps. Fr. Floberg told us that our monies would be used also to fund the annual Christmas Dinner that his three mission churches cook for the residents of the three camps on the Standing Rock Reservation.  They will feed 600 people in a giant room at the casino in Fort Yates.

Vote on Ordination to the Diaconate: The Vestry voted on the motion that we approve Patti Blaine to Bishop Singh to holy ordination of the vocational diaconate. The vote was a UNANIMOUS yes!

Capital Campaign Report

The Capital Campaign committee has been interviewing firms who submitted proposals. Some things the committee is thinking about and wants the Vestry and church to be aware of:

  • A Christ Church capital campaign is a spiritual journey requiring of us much prayer and work.
  • A capital campaign to be successful requires a significant commitment of time by the church leadership and others.
  • The consultant does not do the gift ask.  We do it directly with the potential donor
  • Capital campaign is not limited to raising money for capital projects/repair. It would include the establishment of a capital reserve fund, a mechanism for planned giving, and a fund for mission outreach.

Finance Report

There was discussion about the budget and the need to add line items for a Sunday School teacher/youth and an additional $500 for the garden for mulch.

December monthly summary: December income includes $14,370 in pledges that were pre-paid in December 2015 resulting in a total income of about $313,350.  Expenses were about $351,400 resulting in a 2016 deficit of about $38,000. In December income increased by about $44,200 and expenses increased by about $22,900.  There were no extraordinary items of income or expenses, although Pledge Envelope income increased by about $19,000.

Property Report:

Ongoing projects include:

·       North Aisle Roof repair – CSTM Roofing will complete the replacement of the roof over the north aisle of the Church and install new flashing along the area of façade.  CSTM has also provided a painted sealer over the roof above the Church entrance on East Avenue.  Bero Architects was hired to serve as the project manager and has provided a post construction report.  This work is substantially complete with a sealer to be applied next spring. 

·       Sacristy Roof Leak – CSTM Roofing investigated the source of the leak in the roof over the Sacristy and applied a sealer in the area where it was leaking.  The leak has stopped and the work is complete. 

·       Lawn Street Façade Study – Christ Church was awarded a $4,000 grant for Sacred Sites to cover the cost of an architectural study for the repair of the façade. 

·       Chancel Lighting – We are working with Newton Lighting Enterprises on options for improving the lighting in the Chancel, Nave and Narthex areas.  They have provided a report for our review that would change current lighting to LED bulbs.  There are no savings for RG&E incentives with this proposal.  A report on the lighting proposal will be submitted in January.

Warden’s report

The Executive Committee met with members of the Meal and More board.  Their board has been reduced to 5 people from 8 and they are spread very thin. Christ Church supports A Meal and More and wants to help. Their biggest need is more members on the board. The executive team from Meal and More was given an open invitation to meet with the CC Executive Committee every month so that we can be in communication. Lois Jones will serve as a liaison if they have questions about Christ Church.

Vestry on Call reports

Why have lectors’ names stopped appearing in the bulletin? Response:  There are too many times that the readers change at the last minute.  There is a lot of prep for the bulletins and they need to go to print by Thursday morning.  It ends up working against our goal of knowing each others’ names if the names and readers don’t match.

 

From the Archives

Thanks to the loan of books from Christ Church archivist Mary Schultz, The Song will be highlighting some excerpts about Christ Church history in this and future issues. We are fortunate to have two history books that were written about the church, Christ Church: A Story-Chronological, by Jane Marsh Parker, covering the years 1854-1905, andChrist Church Rochester: The First Hundred Years 1855-1955,  by James Demcey Hendryx.

Part V Please watch this space: we are looking into the histories of some of the donated items in Christ Church such as the angel where the lectors read, the statue of Mary, and other beautiful items.

 

Christmas 2016

 Christmas woodcut ©1985 V. Jutsum (pictured above)

Christmas woodcut ©1985 V. Jutsum (pictured above)

Christ Church Rochester                                               Christmas and Epiphany 2016 & 2017             The Song                                                                                                        vol. 2 issue 2

Holiest night, Darkness lifts, and from heaven shines a lovely and splendid light. Angels appear and announce peace. Sweetly singing their cheerful songs. Come, Christians, wake and come quickly! Follow the shepherds who are eagerly coming, hurry to Bethlehem, come see your crown, here lies the child. Divine child! Now morning is beaming down upon us, God has embraced humanity and the world. Go now to the manger and see the child. See the joyous shepherds. Rejoice and sing to God, praise heaven and earth. Hallelujah!

 © Renate Eckart(above)&nbsp;

© Renate Eckart(above) 

 Christmas block print © 2000 Val Jutsum (below) digital media

Christmas block print © 2000 Val Jutsum (below) digital media

Editor note:

Bodies are like wrappers. They are the outside part that covers a present. They wear the bow and the label. Yet, they are, in fact, integral to the health of the person, inside. They are the Möbius Band. The outside and the inside are the same side.

 

The building of Christ Church Rochester is the body of the life inside it. It is a community center, in the heart of Rochester’s East End Cultural District, where people get fed in all the ways that are essential. Actual food is served twice a week to people who need it by Meal and More. World class organ concerts, called Tuesday Pipes, take place for free every Tuesday at lunch time in connection with the Eastman School of Music. The large garden provides welcoming green space downtown and is a haven for migrating butterflies in connection with the Seneca Park Zoo, as well as an outdoor gallery space for contemporary art exhibitions for ROCO and the building is a venue for The Rochester Jazz Fest. The human spirit is nurtured in the experience of the ancient, sung service of Compline every Sunday night, October through April, as well as the practice of christian Episcopal worship in the Anglo-Catholic style on Sunday mornings all year long. 

 

Christ Church Rochester needs your help to repair and maintain the 150 year old body of stone and tree and grass; of music and food and caring; of art and love. Please consider making a gift of a tax-deductible donation by visiting http://christchurchrochester.org  or  http://songforchristchurch.org   Thank you. 

 

This is the time of year we give gifts to total strangers, co-workers, friends and our dearest, dear ones. We wrap them because we know that the wrapping is important.

 

Val Jutsum

 M.V. Hill © 1992

M.V. Hill © 1992

                                               Rector's Notes

“For a star to be born, there is one thing that must happen: a gaseous nebula must collapse. 

So collapse. 

Crumble.

This is not your destruction. 

This is your birth.”

            Nikka Ursula

 

I feel so much compassion for the wise men who followed the star. When I was a child, my compassion surfaced as pity. No matter which crèche or nativity seen, I always read them the same: they were sad because the real king was this baby. And they had been told to give away the things that made them so kingly. To give them to the baby. Later in life my compassion surfaced as sympathy. They were the last to make it to the manger. The angels burst open the night sky with song and light for the shepherds, but not for the wise men. Far away from those angel lit skies, the wise men had to study and question all on their own the star that appeared. The slowness of their long journey seemed symbolic of the slowness of their understanding - punishment even, for living inside their heads as astrologers, as scholars.

Midlife opens a new perspective. They are wise because they don’t care about the knowledge they’ve amassed. Maybe at one point in their lives they did, but not now. These old men want to concede their power to the child – they don’t take it personally. They know that in every age there is an old order, and the old order must die to the new – they don’t take this personally, either.

They’ve lived long enough to know that true power is surrender. Surrender of possessions that otherwise possess us, whether those possessions are in our bank accounts or in our heads.  They know that every beginning is preceded by an ending, and they are comfortable enough in their own skin to be known in their period of history as “the ending.” 

And yet this changing of the guard at the manger will not mean a swift transition into the new order. Laying their crowns at the baby’s manger is not such a big deal.  What makes them wise, what makes them stand apart from everyone else, what makes them fit to be kings is how they are willing to live out the rest of their lives as strangers instead of kings. Leaving their crowns with the baby is the easy part. The hard part, the part they came all this way for, is the return journey. They won’t be the same after the manger experience (no one ever is). They won’t fit in. And they probably know that no one back home will listen to them, let alone believe them. There are journeys we make that are the stuff of legends, that are even Biblical in proportion. The journey of the magi, led by the star, is one of them.

 But it’s this other journey that fills me with compassion for the magi. It’s not so much that they won’t be the kings they once were but, (in the words of T.S. Elliot) they will live out the rest of their lives “no longer at ease in the old dispensation,” which is a hard way to live. And yet it’s the only life to live if you’ve seen and understood what the wise men have.

Maybe they’ll become prophets.

Ruth+

 Light over Bethlehem © T. Jutsum

Light over Bethlehem © T. Jutsum

MUSIC NOTES FROM STEPHEN

 

The Christmas season will be richly celebrated at Christ Church with music from the Christ Church Choir, Youth Ensemble, Schola Cantorum, VanDelinder Fellows: Jiaqi Shao, Madeleine Woodworth, and Alden Wright; Associate organists: David Higgs and William Porter, an international string ensemble: Janet Milnes, Liza Sommers, George Taylor, Noah Fields, Steven Doane, Rosie Elliott, Benjamin Doane, and Cathy Elliott; and the Smith Family String Players.

 

At the 5:00 P.M. Eucharist, the Christ Church Youth Ensemble will perform two works from "A Ceremony of Carols" composed by Benjamin Britten in 1942: "Procession" and "This Little Babe".  The Smith Family String Players will perform two carols. VanDelinder Fellows: Jiaqi Shao, Madeleine Woodworth, and Alden Wright lead and direct the music for this liturgy.

 

Come early to get a seat for the 10:30 P.M. Eucharist with prelude beginning at 10:15 P.M. Prelude music will consist of a medley of carols on strings and organ including the Christ Church Choir.  Choral works will include: Heiligste Nacht by Johann Michael Haydn (Arr. Stephen Kennedy); Jesus Christ The Apple Tree by Elizabeth Poston; and a setting of the Ave Maria by Camille Saint-Saëns. Our Associate Organists: David Higgs and William Porter will lead the singing of carols from the organ in this Solemn sung liturgy.

 

The Christmas Day Eucharist on Sunday, the 25th will be at 10:00 A.M. and will feature the singing of Christmas Carols by the congregation.  Former Fellow, Stacey Yang will play voluntaries, and William Porter and Stephen Kennedy will lead the hymn singing from the organ.  

 

Compline, sung by the Schola Cantorum will not be observed on Sunday, December 25, but will resume on Sunday, January 1st and will be preceded by a Candlelight Concert with a reception following Compline. The title of this concert will be: "A Viennese New Year in Rochester: Mozart and Mendelssohn on Historical Instruments.” Duo Glenna Curren and Christopher Petit will perform works by Mendelssohn and Mozart, including Mozart's rarely-heard work for cello and piano, completed by Annette Isserlis. The performance will feature Eastman's fortepiano: a replica of a 1795 piano by Anton Walter, the most famous Viennese maker of the time. Ms. Curren will perform on a Milanese cello built circa 1700.

 

Program

Andantino for piano and cello - W. A. Mozart (completed by Anette Isserlis)

 

Sonata No. 1 for Piano and Cello, Opus 45 - Felix Mendelssohn

 

Song Without Words for Cello and Piano, Op. 109 - Mendelssohn (published posthumously)

 

***

 

Merry Christmas everyone!

SATURDAY, January 7, 2017

• 7:00-8:00 p.m. 12th Night Celebration:  Procession of the Three Kings, the Christ Church Choir. David Higgs and Stephen Kennedy, organists.

 Renate Eckart won a juror award from the Rochester Art Club for her painting, "A quiet afternoon".

Renate Eckart won a juror award from the Rochester Art Club for her painting, "A quiet afternoon".

EVENTS

 

EVENTS and ANNOUNCEMENTS in This Issue

Christmas Season Service Times

Candlelight Concert with Compline

Advent Celebration (performed by Christ Church Youth Ensemble)

R.A.I.H.N.

Pittsford Food Cupboard

Financial News and Report

Vestry Minutes

From the Archives 

Advent Celebration

A Celebration for Advent- performed by Christ Church Youth Ensemble, on the fourth Sunday of Advent, December18, 2016

GOSPEL READER: Now the birth of Jesus the Messiah took place in this way.  When his mother Mary had been engaged to Joseph, but before they lived together, she was found to be with child from the Holy Spirit.  Her husband Joseph, being a righteous man and unwilling to expose her to public disgrace, planned to dismiss her quietly.  But just when he had resolved to do this, an angel of the Lord appeared to him in a dream.

 

Resonet in Laudibus                                14th century carol

Text: Resonet in laudibus cum iucundis plausibus

Sion cum fidelibus, Apparuit quem genuit Maria.

Translation: Let Sion resound with the pleasant, with the faithful, he who was born of Mary.

LECTERN READER:  “Questions about Angels” 

Questions About Angels

By Billy Collins

Of all the questions you might want to ask

about angels, the only one you ever hear

is how many can dance on the head of a pin. 

 

No curiosity about how they pass the eternal time

besides circling the Throne chanting in Latin

or delivering a crust of bread to a hermit on earth

or guiding a boy and girl across a rickety wooden bridge.

 

Do they fly through God’s body and come out singing?

Do they swing like children from the hinges

of the spirit world saying their names backwards and forwards?

Do they sit alone in little gardens changing colors?

 

What about their sleeping habits, the fabric of their robes, 

their diet of unfiltered divine light?

What goes on inside their luminous heads? Is there a wall 

these tall presences can look over and see hell?

 

If an angel fell off a cloud would he leave a hole 

in a river and would the hole float along endlessly 

filled with the silent letters of every angelic word?

 

If an angel delivered the mail would he arrive 

in a blinding rush of wings or would he just assume 

the appearance of the regular mailman and 

whistle up the driveway reading the postcards?

 

No, the medieval theologians control the court. 

The only question you ever hear is about 

the little dance floor on the head of a pin 

where halos are meant to converge and drift invisibly.

 

It is designed to make us think in millions, 

billions, to make us run out of numbers and collapse 

into infinity, but perhaps the answer is simply one: 

one female angel dancing alone in her stocking feet, 

a small jazz combo working in the background.

 

She sways like a branch in the wind, her beautiful 

eyes closed, and the tall thin bassist leans over 

to glance at his watch because she has been dancing 

forever, and it is very late, even for musicians.

 

GOSPEL READER: In a dream the angel said, “Joseph, son of David, do not be afraid to take Mary as your wife, for the child conceived in her is from the Holy Spirit. She will bear a son, and you are to name him Jesus, for he will save his people from their sins.” All this took place to fulfill what had been spoken by the Lord through the prophet:

“Look, the virgin shall conceive and bear a son, and they shall name him Emmanuel, which means ‘God is with us.’”

Congregational Carol: HYMN 96: Angels we have heard on high (vs. 1)

GOSPEL READER: When Joseph awoke from sleep, he did as the angel of the Lord commanded him; he took her as his wife, but had no marital relations with her until she had borne a son; and he named him Jesus.

LECTERN READER: Today and in the days to come, let us remember Joseph.  We know so little of his own story.  In the telling of the birth of our messiah, Joseph takes his place quietly and always in the background.  We can imagine his own fears, his own sense of dread.  Really, what was asked of Joseph surpasses our imagination, but we can imagine his own mighty struggle to keep the faith – in God, in the angel, in the dreams, and even in Mary. 

 

The Cherry Tree Carol            Traditional English carol, arr. David Willcocks (1919-2015)

Performed by the Christ Church Youth Ensemble

Text: Joseph was an old man, an old man was he, when he wedded Mary, in the land of Galilee. And as they were walking through an orchard so good, where cherries and berries as red as any blood. O then bespoke Mary, with words both meek and mild: ‘Pluck me one cherry, Joseph, for that I am with child.’ ‘Go to the tree then, Mary, and it shall bow to thee; and you shall gather cherries by one, by two, by three.’ Then bowed down the highest tree unto our lady’s hand; ‘see,’ Mary cried, ‘see, Joseph, I have cherries at command.’ ‘O eat your cherries, Mary, O eat your cherries now; O eat your cherries, Mary, that grow upon the bough.’ Then Mary plucked a cherry, as red as any blood, then Mary went she homewards all with her heavy load.

 

POETRY READER:  

Winter Grace: A poem by Patricia Fargnoli:

If you have seen the snow

under the lamppost

piled up like a white beaver hat on the picnic table

or somewhere slowly falling

into the brook

to be swallowed by water,

then you have seen beauty

and know it for its transience.

And if you have gone out in the snow

for only the pleasure

of walking barely protected

from the galaxies, 

the flakes settling on your parka

like dust from just-born stars,

the cold waking you

as if from long sleeping, 

then you can understand

how, more often than not,

truth is found in silence,

how the natural world comes to you

if you go out to meet it,

its icy ditches filled with dead weeds,

its vacant birdhouses, and dens

full of the sleeping.

But this is the slowed-down season

held fast by darkness

and if no one comes to keep you company

then keep watch over your own solitude.

In that stillness, you will learn

with your whole body

the significance of cold

and the night,

which is otherwise always eluding you. 

 

 

An Advent Prayer

 

Presider: Help us to understand the words of the poet, that, “more often than not, truth is found in silence,” and “in stillness we shall learn with our wholebody the significance of cold and the night.” May your hidden shining never elude us, in night and in cold, in darkness and in waiting, that we may be restored to that place where we once met as shepherds at the stable after hearing the angels sing. Amen

R.A.I.H.N.

It's the giving season and time to reflect on why we give. Please let us remind you of all the wonderful reasons to choose RAIHN as the recipient of your end-of-year generosity: 

  • I love the bus drivers. They are really nice! (2016 family) 
  • I loved the RAIHN program. I just loved the staff and volunteers, as they really helped my family stay together during this tough time. (2016 family) 
  • I learned to save more money, share with others, and communicate. (2016 family) 
  • It is a great program. I like the fact that we were welcomed. We felt at home. (2016 family) 
  • RAIHN is here to help you, not carry you. (2015 family)
  •  You were the light at one of the darkest chapters of my family's life. Your kindness and encouragement has stayed with us to this day. (email received in 2016 from a 2012 family) 
  • Getting into RAIHN is like getting the golden ticket! (community case worker)

Please check your mail for the Annual Appeal letter. This is scheduled to hit mailboxes shortly after Thanksgiving. We truly appreciate your support as we assist homeless families to achieve sustainable independence by supporting them with tailored services, including shelter, food, personalized case management and a diverse network of caring volunteers. 

BTW - doing the dinner on Sunday was such an enjoyable time. These families are a joy to be with! (email from First Universalist meal coordinator) 

Please remember RAIHN when doing your holiday shopping! Click on the images above for AmazonSmile or GoodShop. By linking your accounts and selecting RAIHN as your chosen recipient, a portion of your purchase will be donated to RAIHN! 

RAIHN 34 Meigs St. 

Rochester, NY 14607

585-506-9050   

PLEASE HELP FILL THE FOOD CUPBOARD BASKET

The Pittsford Food Cupboard supplies over 4,000 households totaling over 9,400 people.  They provide food and other items to 6 different zip codes:  E Rochester, Pittsford, Brighton and 3 in Rochester.  Some items they are always in need of:

  • Pasta and pasta sauce
  • Canned fruits and vegetables
  • Hearty soups and tuna
  • Cereals

The items are dropped off to the food cupboard once a month.  The volunteers are always so appreciative. Thank you Christ Church for helping to fill the basket that is in the back of the church every Sunday.

In an effort to bring you up to the minute news, this section will be updated frequently with the latest financial news. ed. note

Christ Church Finance Report

NEW NEWS-

Bulletin Insert from Finance Committee (beginning 11/13)

From the Finance Committee

Updated financial information is shown below, and always available via The Song and the bulletin board!

October YTD

  • Income:  $248,684
  • Expenses: $293,681
  • Deficit YTD: ($44,997)

Account Balances

  • Checking: $53,000
  • Fidelity: $378,150
  • Amsden Trust: $225,000
  • Flower Fund: $11,000

October News

The Grant Committee is thrilled to announce that Christ Church has been awarded $4,000 as the recipient of a Consulting Grant from the Sacred Sites Fund under the New York State Landmarks Conservancy. These funds will go toward engineering consulting to address issues with the Lawn Street façade. In January 2017 we will apply for a Sacred Sites Challenge Grant to help with the costs of the work associated with repairing the façade. Go Christ Church! (Still waiting to hear on our larger grant application to the NYS Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation … go light a candle!)

YAY!

update 10/21/2016-

From the Finance Committee

Updated financial information is shown below, and always available via The Song and the Christ Church bulletin board.

September YTD

  • Income:  $216,450
  • Expenses: $266,231
  • Deficit YTD: ($49,781)

September News

In response to a question from last month … inquiring about how we deal with the deficit … we lean on our reserves or “savings” account (just like at home!).

Work on the protective glass behind the Tiffany Chancel windows will begin the week of 10/24 and is sponsored, in part, by a grant from The Farash Foundation, for which we are very grateful. We are still waiting to hear on our grant applications to Sacred Sites and the NYS Office of Parks and Historic Preservation – watch this space!

The first of three grant applications has been approved!

Christ Church was notified that we won an Emergency Repair grant of $4,500 from the Farash Foundation for repairs to the protective glass covering our Tiffany windows in the chancel. Thank you to the Property and Grant Committees for your hard work, and THANK YOU to the Farash Foundation! Grant 1 successful, 3 more TBA!

Christ Church Finance 101

Welcome to the new school year from your Christ Church Finance Committee. Didn’t realize you’d signed up for the class this year? No problem, we’ll make it easy for you to get your homework in on time and to keep up with the class!

Let’s begin with a little bit of history, so we’re all reading from the same text (or singing from the same hymnal).  J

Financial State of Affairs

Do you ever sit in our beautiful sanctuary and wonder where your weekly contributions go? If not, take a quiet moment to look around and consider all that goes into keeping our doors open and the building sound. It’s a big place! And it’s aging! We offer tremendous programs to parishioners and guests alike. Just as you have bills and expenses at home, we have them here at Christ Church – heat, water, electricity, staff, programs, insurance – it all adds up.  

Over the course of the past two years we’ve lost a number of significant contributors who have either passed on or moved away, and that has had a very direct impact on our financial health. As of August 31, 2016 we had a deficit of $48,500, and it is growing.

These aren’t new expenses every month, just our cumulative income and expenses month-to-month.

Simply put, there’s more going out than coming in.

Taking Care of Our Home

Certainly one of our largest expenses is the physical plant, and the Property Committee has done a heroic job of prioritizing, negotiating and managing the significant repairs that are already underway. You know that from reading last week’s Bulletin Insert, right? The Vestry approved about $170,000 in repairs to cover this work, but the list of other, needed repairs continues to grow.

So, how do we, as a small parish, care for our historic space? In a few ways, actually. Read on …

Grants

A small group of parishioners came together in late spring to brainstorm and pursue grant monies. To-date we have submitted three (3) applications:

1. NYS Landmarks Conservancy/Sacred Sites Consulting Grant: an application for $5,250 to fund architectural consulting services for repairs to the Lawn Street façade, including a structural engineering review, solutions for permanent repair or rebuilding, and work with the State Historic Preservation Office. The Sacred Sites grant is a 50% match grant. A decision is expected in October.

2. NYS Environmental Preservation Grant: an application for $326,500 for additional repairs to the roof, window sills, repair of three clerestory windows, plaster repairs and completion of interior painting. The Preservation grant is a 75% match grant. A decision is expected in December.

3. Farash Foundation/Emergency Repair Grant: an application for $7,400 for repair of protective glass covering the Chancel Tiffany windows. Farash Emergency grants fund 100% of the repair.  (Update: Got this in October!)

Next up for the Committee will be an application for Sacred Sites for the work to fix the Lawn Street wall (50% of cost can be requested), as well as review of the potential for us to apply for a NYS “Main Street” grant.

Stewardship and Capital Campaigns

In addition to seeking financial support from funding agencies, we need to ask ourselves if we are doing everything we can to sustain our parish in our own giving.

A Stewardship Campaign will begin soon, and is especially important this year as we continue to seek grants. Erasing our deficit and achieving a balanced budget is attractive to grant organizations, and helps us to stretch our own funds.  

Beyond the Stewardship Campaign, another group of parishioners has begun work on a Capital Campaign. This Campaign will solicit financial support from both our own parish as well as the broader community in which we will live and serve.

Homework Assignment

We will be including a brief financial “snapshot” in the Bulletin from now on, so you’ll know how we’re doing. Your assignment is to stay up-do-date by reading the Bulletin and participating in the Stewardship and Capital Campaigns as they are launched.

Please feel free to contact a committee member for more information and/or feedback.

The Christ Church Finance Committee

  • Jeremy Cooney
  • Josie Dewey
  • Norm Geil
  • Meg Mackey
  • Ron Vukman

Christ Church Vestry Minutes

 

Minutes, September 20, 2016

1. A summary document regarding the history of how the Amsden Fund has been used was passed around and vestry members discussed proposals for the use of the funds in 2016-17.  

Resolution:  Amsden monies will be used to fund the Choral Scholar apprenticeship ($1500) and Music Scholar apprenticeship ($2500) for Spring 2017 was passed 7-3-1.

2. A St. John Fisher Student has applied and been accepted to teach Sunday School and lead Youth Group meetings.  The vestry discussed ways for raising money to pay the Sunday School teacher/Youth Group leader.  In the future it needs to be added as a line item to the Church budget. 

3. We are shorthanded for altar guild (acolyte, verger, servers).  Jim Bement and Bill Soleim will write in The Song to get the word out that we need people.

4.  John Ford, Joe McCutcheon, Mary Pietrzykowski will serve on the nominating committee along with Jim Bement and Bill Soleim and(two vestry members who are going off vestry) and Warden Deb VanderBilt.

5. Property report: Josie moved to appropriate $3500 for the protective glass covering the chancel windows; Peg Britt seconded.  Discussion pointed out that they put in two estimates for the work ($8000 and $4500) and Farash Foundation funded 100% of the lower estimate. Passed unanimously.

6. Stewardship Committee report: The committee has set up meetings with four groups that help with Capital Campaigns, including Klote Associates and the Episcopal Church Foundation – each will make a presentation to the steering committee. All groups offer readiness assessments that involve the entire church.  

Property & Finance Committees Report to the Christ Church Vestry (excerpts)

Submitted by Hugh E. Kierig, September 20, 2016

·         Yellow Jackets –  In August there was found to be an infestation of yellow jackets on the exterior of the Tower.  The recommendation at this time by the exterminators is to leave them alone for the end of the season and not take any action regarding their extermination.  Bero has reviewed the situation and believes there may be a need to do some mortaring of the stones to keep the yellow jackets out for next spring. 

·         Architects Review of Building Opportunities -  Several of us took Bero Architects on a tour of the church on September 15th.  A similar tour will be done with Dave Bienetti of SWBR Architects on September 21st .

·         Chancel, Narthex, and Other Lighting -  We have investigated lighting issues within the sanctuary including replacement of burnt bulbs, enhanced lighting in the Chancel and Narthex, and new lighting fixtures for the Narthex bulletin board.  Belliter Electric has recommended Newton Lighting to assist in recommendations regarding new lighting in the Chancel and light replacement in the Nave.  The current Chancel and Nave lights are old and replacement bulbs are no longer available.  Consideration will be given to LED lights which provide greater lighting with less energy and have a longer life.  Timing of these replacements will be timed when scaffolds are in place.

·         Protective Glass Covering for Chancel Windows – $8,000.  Grant approval from Farash Foundation was announced today for $4,500 for the replacement of protective glass panels to the Tiffany windows in the Chancel.  Our cost of the project will be $3,500.

·         North Aisle Roof Repair – $73,000.  The amount for this project is what was approved in May based on an estimate from Bero Associates.  From further discussions this summer with Bero, Swiatek, and the roof contractor, CSTM, it was determined that an investigation of the roof structure was necessary.  CSTM tore into the roof to see what was underneath, it was recommended by both Bero and CSTM that the existing roof be removed and be replaced at the original level.  This will lower the roof line by 12 inches thereby creating additional stormwater storage and reduce the likelihood of water infiltrating into the windows.  The new roof surface would be modified bitumen roofing and include new scuppers and downspouts.  (see attached cost breakdown)

o   Recommendation –

  • Demo existing roof and replace to original level - $39,100
  • Replace wood in clerestory window sills - $2,500
  • Exterior window carpentry and finishing - $6,810.
  • Alternate add-ons – new gutters from Nave roof, recoat roof over entrance - $2,000

Total - $50,310

·         Lawn Street Façade: The Property Committee met with Bero Architects regarding the engineering report for the Lawn Street façade.  A preliminary report indicated that the temporary bracing is substandard and not effective.  Through these discussions, additional information has been found (from original construction documents) and it is recommended that conversation with the engineer continue to address some of the structural concerns.  Bero will as well contact a local historical building mason to discuss costs for the repair of the façade.  A grant with Sacred Sites for repairs will be submitted this winter.

·         Gutter Work: Again, as part of the walk around, it was found that many of the downspouts were overflowing.  We believe that the storm water drainage system may be clogged and have asked a contractor to provide an estimate to investigate this problem. 

Minutes October 20, 2016

1. The Vestry discussed the possibility of petitioning the court to formally allow us to not exclude women from Amsden recipients (the will specifies “young men”). Wording we suggested was "Men and women being formally trained for ordained or lay ministry.” Lois Jones volunteered to find out what would be involved in this change.

2. Liaison Reports:  Kevin Finnigan reported that the church’s care team needs new volunteers. Kevin is the point person for this group.

3. Capital Campaign - Joe Schaller reported that meetings continue with capital campaign consultants:  Episcopal Church Foundation, Samantha Standing, and Global Group are scheduled for October/November.

4. Property Committee: The committee has determined that repair work to the sanctuary must be delayed until 2018, given how many weddings are already scheduled (and deposits paid) and Eastman events scheduled. 

5. The vestry finalized discussion to pay the Sunday School Teacher $625 from alternative funds. Motion passed unanimously.

6. Report on Lease with Catholic Family Center. Norm Geil prepared a sample lease for vestry to consider. We are approving the intent to lease and Norm will proceed with the approval.

Passed unanimously.

 

 

From the Archives 

Thanks to the loan of books from Christ Church archivist Mary Schultz, The Song will be highlighting some excerpts about Christ Church history in this and future issues. We are fortunate to have two history books that were written about the church, Christ Church: A Story-Chronological, by Jane Marsh Parker, covering the years 1854-1905, andChrist Church Rochester: The First Hundred Years 1855-1955,  by James Demcey Hendryx.

Part IV     The Women of Christ Church 

The women of Christ Church are mentioned in the histories of Hendryx and Parker, and what they are mentioned for reflects the times very clearly.  No women are on the vestry; in fact, no women are in the choir in the list from 1905 (there’s a long list of sopranos, so those parts must have been sung by boys).  But women are in leadership positions in organizations that they created for work that was seen as appropriate to them at that time.

The first Ladies Society was established in 1855, the first year the church was established.

The Sewing Society of CC (originally called The Female Sewing and Benevolent Society) was an active fundraising organization, begun in 1894. It raised funds to pay for the Sunday School builing (1200 in 1861) and the corona in the now-chapel (1869).

Another area of leadership was the Board of Trustees of the Church Home. When it was organized in 1869, Mrs. Dewey, Mrs. Upton, Mrs JL Booth, Mrs. J Moreau Smith, Miss Marian Smith and Mrs. Edward Smith, all members of Christ Church.

Some women are specifically singled out for notice or praise from Hendryx: The first baptism was Eliza DeVinney, age 23, May 13, 1855.  Mrs. Charles Davis (mary Eleanor Welton) was the daughter of Rev. Alanson Welton, who was a missionary to the western part of the Diocese of New York.  Her daughter Charlotte was a pupil and then a teacher in the CC Sunday School for 50 years when she was celebrated for that at the Golden Jubilee in 1905, and her niece, Kate Elizabeth Davis, took over from her and taught until she died in 1947.

Lucy Sabey Winn and her husband Nathaniel Winn came to Christ Church in 1861, and built a house at 65 East Avenue. From that time until CC changed from bread to wafers for communion in 1905, all of the communion bread was baked in Lucy Winn’s kitchen. Their daughter, Ella Winn, was a member of the Parish Aid group, and as secretary from 1891 to 1929, she kept extremely detailed notes about parish life and James Hendryx calls them “the most complete history of [those] 38 eventful years.” (28).

Many of the mentions of women look like this: “Mrs. Frances Child had four daughters who all went on to become active CC members, as did their grandchildren: Mrs. D.M. Dewey, Mrs. Albert E. Walker, Mrs. Elbert Scrantom and Mrs. J.M Winslow.”  As was the custom, women are called by their husband’s name.  The single women are named with a first name, such as Eliza DeVinney, above. The women’s names from the list of Sunday School teachers in 1905 (most of which were women, and most of them were single women) is so evocative of the times: Julia, Anna, Isabel, Winifred, Ruth, Beulah, Louise, Sadie, Lily, Caroline, Charlotte, Gabrielle, Jennie, Carrie, Eleanor, Kate, and Margaret.  Not a Heather or Megan among them!

Advent 2016

Coming Home ©2015 Renate Eckart (pictured above)

Christ Church Rochester                                               Advent 2016          The Song                                                              vol. 2    issue 1

Lo! He Comes © 2005 Tim Jutsum  (above) acrylic on canvas

Lo! he comes, with clouds descending,
once for our salvation slain;
thousand thousand saints attending
swell the triumph of his train: 
Alleluia! alleluia! alleluia!
Christ the Lord returns to reign.

 

Lo! He comes with clouds descending

Hymn   58       The 1982 Episcopal Hymnal

Tempest © 2004 Tim Jutsum (below) acrylic on canvas

Editor note:

Advent

Happy New Year!  

We have the elegant tradition of beginning the liturgical year with the season of Advent. I love that it is an ancient, quiet, contemplative enclave. I love that, at it’s core, it vibrates with the anticipation of the conclusion of the current space-time experience. I love that this epoch will end when God proclaims that it is completed and it will be replaced with mysterious perfection. It is the astonishing satisfaction of our longing.  It is at the heart of where our Home is.

The last vestry meeting was shared by many parishioners who are not on the vestry, We talked of our concerns around hate speech and the potential for harm or injustice inflicted on people because of their beliefs, their race, their nationality, or their identity as LGBTQ. There was an urgent sense that the election and the language used, by now President elect Trump, might yet inspire civil strife. There was a very real sense that many of us were grappling with a way to manage our feelings that was consistent with our calling as people of faith.

The actions of God’s people embrace the actions of Jesus.  A GoogleGroup was formed called SanctuaryatChristChurch. Anyone interested can join and be informed of various ways to participate. You should have received an email from Deb Vanderbilt. Feel free to email Deb at dvanderbilt@sjfc.edu if you didn’t get an invitation.

We long for the triumph of God breaking the final barrier between this world, which has pain, illness, grief, evil, sin and death baked right in, and the radically different unimaginable new world in which we will be at home. Meanwhile, there is work to do that keeps us busy sharing God’s kingdom on earth as it is in heaven. 

Wonderfully, while engaged in our day to day, we get glimpses of this glory, like flashing sunlight reflected on water, and that feeds our hope. Hope is a requirement for life just like food and air. It is a gift of God, the Spirit. Hope does not disappoint us. The weight of that is breathtaking to me. We are working together, in this beautiful space of Christ Church surrounded by enrapturing music and art, to practice living our lives connected in Christ, to each other, and the world in which we find ourselves. 

Val Jutsum

                                               Rector's Notes

Pray for the peace of Jerusalem. Psalm 122 was a pilgrimage song sung by the multitudes who left their villages to pilgrim to Jerusalem for the annual holy days. These pilgrimages were recurring liturgical events (like Advent), and fraught with meaning - the holy days, the pilgrimage, and above all, the city, the gathering place where the brothers and sisters of Israel would be in communion with each other before the dwelling place of God. The peace of Jerusalem was a burning concern for the psalmist and for those who sang it.

 

Shaalu shelom yerusalayim. Pray for the peace of Jerusalem, a city whose name itself is built on the Hebrew shalom, peace. A city sacred to all three of the world’s monotheistic religions, a symbol of peace to Judaism, Christianity and Islam, and yet a city that has proven throughout history to be one of the most fought over cities of the world. A city that had seen major military campaigns - wars fought in and across Palestine and against, or in the vicinity of Jerusalem well before Jesus was born.  Jesus himself prayed psalm 122 on his arrival to Jerusalem for Passover, before he wept over it and the warfare that would demand even his execution : O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, the city that kills the prophets and stones those who are sent to it! How often would I have gathered your children together as a hen gathers her brood under her wings, and you were not willing! Pray for the peace of Jerusalem, shaalu shelom yerusalayim.

 

How do Christians pray for a city that has become an epicenter of world tensions? How shall we pray for the peace of Jerusalem when we know that whatever peace the people of that occupying and occupied land might know is, in the words of Methodist pastor, James Howell, as “transient as the success of armed security?” When the “peace” of Jerusalem is as “ fragile as the temperament of the next shooter, stabber, or suicide bomber?” It is the first Sunday of Advent, we are watching and waiting for the Prince of Peace, and blanching over Jerusalem is not an option. Not to pray for the peace of Jerusalem (or Aleppo, or Kabul, or Fallujah) is never an option. How do we believe there will peace in Jerusalem or anywhere in an era of military conflict and international mistrust – in an era of nationalism the world over? Shaalu shelom yerusalayim. How? Why? My first prayer would be that my own nation learn to beat its swords into plowshares. It is good to listen to Jesus’ followers who know and teach about prayer. I think of Henri Nouwen.

 

Henri Nouwen grew up in the Netherlands where wagon wheels decorated the entrances of farms or the walls of restaurants. These wagon wheels imbedded themselves in his psyche with their wide rims, strong wooden spokes and big hubs. “These wheels,” he said, “help me understand the importance of a life lived from the center. When I move along the rim, I can reach one spoke after the other, but when I stay at the hub, I am in touch with all the spokes at once...to pray is to move to the center of all life and all love.” This helps me to understand, “Pray for the peace of Jerusalem.” It helps me envision the lone heart of the ancient psalmist, whose heart was the hub of a prayer that expanded and became a prayer for, and a prayer of, every child of war, every refugee swimming from the smuggler’s boat for his life. “I think of the hub as my own heart,” Henri Nouwen wrote, “and as the heart of God, and the heart of the world. When I pray,” he wrote, “ I enter into the depth of my own heart and find there the heart of God who speaks to me of love. And I recognize right there the place where all of my sisters and brothers are in communion with each other.”

 

Pray for the peace of Jerusalem. Pray for every family displaced and detained, every living and every dead body pulled out of the rubble, pray for all humanity whose body and heart have been constrained by borders of nationalism, unable to hope, much less believe, that all nations shall stream to the mountain of the Lord’s house, and nation shall not lift up sword against nation.” Pray for the peace of Jerusalem, the place and the time where all of our brothers and sisters are in communion with each other, where flies no flag of any nation because the nation shall not raise up flag over nations. Pray for the coming of this judge and whose mishpat is judgment in favor of the vulnerable – the exiled, the poor, the workers whose families are still hungry – all who are turned away by the judgment of human laws. Pray for a Jerusalem whose peace is born of God’s justice is biased in favor of each pilgrim who seeks Jerusalem.. wherever Jerusalem may be. Shaalu shelom yerusalayim.  

 

They shall beat their swords into plowshares and their spears into pruning hooks. This is God’s vision of peace – pray for this. For this, we have to pray with our hands, with our labor,

fashioning our weapons into tools for harvesting food so that no one will have to go hungry.

 

Shaalu shelom yerusalayim, the hub which is the heart of God’s vision, the heart of God. “The great paradox of the spiritual life is, indeed, that the most personal is most universal,” Henri Nouwen wrote, “and the most intimate is most communal, and that the most contemplative is the most active. The wagon wheel shows that the hub is the center of all energy and movement, even when it seems not to be moving at all. In God all action and all rest are one. So too is prayer.” So we pray for the peace of Jerusalem simply by longing for it, by holding out hope that God’s reign, though it is not a prediction about a specific time, is yet an announcement of a truth yet to fully unfold in our sight, an announcement of a God who is Himself unfolding before our eyes even where we can’t see him. How does the Church pray for the peace of Jerusalem? By admitting that it sees now in a mirror dimly, but will see some day face to face, that it knows now only in part. By keeping the faith of Advent: that thought the kingdom has come, yet it will come; that though the kingdom will come, yet it has come.

 

We pray for the peace of Jerusalem by our joining our vision to God’s: Then I saw a new heaven and a new earth, for the first heaven and the first earth had passed away, and there was no longer any sea. I saw the holy city, the new Jerusalem, a new Aleppo, a new Rochester - coming down out of heaven from God..and I heard a loud voice from the throne saying, “Look! God’s dwelling place is now among man, and he will dwell with them. They will not rape the earth with gas pipelines nor desecrate what is sacred, they will know no suicide bombs, and no borders of nationalism; they will turn their weapons into tools for harvesting food, They will be his people, and God himself will be with them and will be their God.”

 

Ruth+

sermon preached at Christ Church Rochester 11/27/2016

sermon for Advent 1 2016     November 27

Cobbs Hill © 2006 T. Jutsum

 

MUSIC NOTES FROM STEPHEN

We celebrate the youth of our parish by giving them opportunities to participate in sharing their musical gifts and skills in our liturgies.  At Christ Church, youth are learning to work together to develop skills of ensemble and solo performance.  By engaging in this kind of high-level process kids also learn great life lessons.  They also become a repository of treasured timeless expressions in art.  For centuries, the church has been a special place for people to create great works of art as an expression or affirmation.  It is wonderful to know that so many of the great artistic expressions from the past are being passed on to the youth of our parish in this way. The music-training process is not only aimed at keeping ancient art alive, but is a process that aids the individual in generating musical expression for the present and future. Music is an art form that must be actively performed to exist.  Unlike the visual arts, music relies on action to bring it about.  Performing is the most accurate word for this action.  

On Sunday, December 18 (Advent IV) at the 11:00 AM Eucharist, the youth of the parish will perform what we are calling a Celebration of Advent by portraying the Lessons and Gospel of the day through additional readings, drama, and music. Shirley Ricker has created a script with texts to be recited by our youth and the members of the Youth Ensemble will perform the music.  We are expecting that our beautifully redecorated Chancel will be filled with many young angels from a dream of St. Joseph.  Rehearsals will take place during Youth Ensemble rehearsal time, so there will be no additional rehearsal time for this event.  If you have a young person at home who may be interested in participating in this special liturgical event, please let Ruth, Shirley, or I know.  

Seasonal Liturgies and Events

FRIDAY: December 2th

• 7:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m. Lessons and Carols with the Christ Church Choir & VanDelinder Fellows

SUNDAY, December 4th

• 8:30 p.m. Candlelight Concert: VanDelinder Fellows Candlelight Concert

• Compline at 9:00 p.m.

• Reception following Compline in Guild Room

SATURDAY, December 24th

• Christmas Eve: 10:15 p.m. Prelude by the Christ Church Choir, David Higgs and William Porter Organist.  

• 10:30 p.m. Solemn, Sung Eucharist with Carols and Motets of Christmas

SATURDAY, January 7, 2017

• 7:00-8:00 p.m. 12th Night Celebration:  Procession of the Three Kings, the Christ Church Choir. David Higgs and Stephen Kennedy, organists.

For more information about concerts and music events, please visit the Christ Church website: http://christchurchrochester.org/index.html.

Here are just a few ways in which Christ Church members and friends may participate in our initiative:

• Becoming an Usher/Candle-lighter for Compline on Sunday Nights

• Make contributions to our Friends of Music Fund. This fund supports music at Christ Church.  It also enables us to provide musical outreach to the Rochester community through music training programs, concerts, and enables us to enhance our liturgies with music.  

• Purchase our various CD recordings for friends and family members as gifts.

• Assist in publicizing music at Christ Church by helping sending emails to the local media

 

Please contact me if you are interested in participating in any aspect of our music program at Christ Church. Stephen Kennedy, Music Director

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

“Tuesday Pipes” at Christ Church: Every Tuesday, Eastman performers, faculty, and alumni will present a 25-minute lunchtime concert at Christ Church. Performances showcase the Craighead-Saunders Organ and Hook & Hastings Organ. Events begin at 12:10pm and are free and open to the public. For more information on the Tuesday Pipes series, please visit http://www.esm.rochester.edu/organ/events/

 

 

 

 

For more information about concerts and music events, please visit the Christ Church website: 

http://www.christchurchrochester.org/

You can also find the billboard of ongoing and special future events by going to the top of this section and clicking on the link "MUSIC GALLERY".

Here are just a few ways in which Christ Church members and friends may participate in our program:

• Becoming an Usher/Candle-lighter for Compline

• Make contributions to our Friends of Music Fund. This fund supports music at Christ Church.  It also enables us to provide musical outreach to the Rochester community through music-training programs, concerts, and enables us to enhance our liturgies with music.  

• Purchase our various CD recordings for friends and family members as gifts.

• Assist in publicizing music at Christ Church by helping sending emails to the local media

 

Please contact me if you are interested in participating in any aspect of our music program at Christ Church. Stephen Kennedy, Music Director stephenk@rochester.rr.com

 

You may also support our music education and enrichment opportunities for young musicians who are dedicating their lives to the field of sacred music by contributing to Christ Church’s "Friends of Music" fund.

Please continue to follow the musical life of our parish by reading the monthly Music Notes and Calendar that are emailed from my address  via MailChimp. 

-Click on the posters below for a full page view.

The music sound files contained here are from the new CD recordings that have just been released. These recordings are available for purchase by clicking the link below. The music used in this publication is edited.  

http://www.christchurchrochester.org/recordings-cd-shop

 

Other links of interest are:

https://www.facebook.com/ccscholacantorum/?fref=ts

https://www.facebook.com/ChristChurchRochester/?fref=ts

http://www.christchurchrochester.org

 Renate Eckart won a juror award from the Rochester Art Club for her painting, "A quiet afternoon".

Renate Eckart won a juror award from the Rochester Art Club for her painting, "A quiet afternoon".

 

EVENTS

 

EVENTS and ANNOUNCEMENTS in This Issue

Christmas Season Service Times

Candlelight Concert with Compline

Advent Celebration (performed by Christ Church Youth Ensemble)

R.A.I.H.N.

Pittsford Food Cupboard

Financial News and Report

Vestry Minutes

From the Archives 

 

ADVENT CELEBRATION

 

Advent Celebration

A Celebration for Advent- performed by Christ Church Youth Ensemble, on the Fourth Sunday of Advent, December 18, 2016

GOSPEL READER: Now the birth of Jesus the Messiah took place in this way.  When his mother Mary had been engaged to Joseph, but before they lived together, she was found to be with child from the Holy Spirit.  Her husband Joseph, being a righteous man and unwilling to expose her to public disgrace, planned to dismiss her quietly.  But just when he had resolved to do this, an angel of the Lord appeared to him in a dream.

 

Resonet in Laudibus                                14th century carol

Text: Resonet in laudibus cum iucundis plausibus

Sion cum fidelibus, Apparuit quem genuit Maria.

Translation: Let Sion resound with the pleasant, with the faithful, he who was born of Mary.

LECTERN READER:  “Questions about Angels” 

Questions About Angels

By Billy Collins

Of all the questions you might want to ask

about angels, the only one you ever hear

is how many can dance on the head of a pin. 

 

No curiosity about how they pass the eternal time

besides circling the Throne chanting in Latin

or delivering a crust of bread to a hermit on earth

or guiding a boy and girl across a rickety wooden bridge.

 

Do they fly through God’s body and come out singing?

Do they swing like children from the hinges

of the spirit world saying their names backwards and forwards?

Do they sit alone in little gardens changing colors?

 

What about their sleeping habits, the fabric of their robes, 

their diet of unfiltered divine light?

What goes on inside their luminous heads? Is there a wall 

these tall presences can look over and see hell?

 

If an angel fell off a cloud would he leave a hole 

in a river and would the hole float along endlessly 

filled with the silent letters of every angelic word?

 

If an angel delivered the mail would he arrive 

in a blinding rush of wings or would he just assume 

the appearance of the regular mailman and 

whistle up the driveway reading the postcards?

 

No, the medieval theologians control the court. 

The only question you ever hear is about 

the little dance floor on the head of a pin 

where halos are meant to converge and drift invisibly.

 

It is designed to make us think in millions, 

billions, to make us run out of numbers and collapse 

into infinity, but perhaps the answer is simply one: 

one female angel dancing alone in her stocking feet, 

a small jazz combo working in the background.

 

She sways like a branch in the wind, her beautiful 

eyes closed, and the tall thin bassist leans over 

to glance at his watch because she has been dancing 

forever, and it is very late, even for musicians.

 

GOSPEL READER: In a dream the angel said, “Joseph, son of David, do not be afraid to take Mary as your wife, for the child conceived in her is from the Holy Spirit. She will bear a son, and you are to name him Jesus, for he will save his people from their sins.” All this took place to fulfill what had been spoken by the Lord through the prophet:

“Look, the virgin shall conceive and bear a son, and they shall name him Emmanuel, which means ‘God is with us.’”

Congregational Carol: HYMN 96: Angels we have heard on high (vs. 1)

GOSPEL READER: When Joseph awoke from sleep, he did as the angel of the Lord commanded him; he took her as his wife, but had no marital relations with her until she had borne a son; and he named him Jesus.

LECTERN READER: Today and in the days to come, let us remember Joseph.  We know so little of his own story.  In the telling of the birth of our messiah, Joseph takes his place quietly and always in the background.  We can imagine his own fears, his own sense of dread.  Really, what was asked of Joseph surpasses our imagination, but we can imagine his own mighty struggle to keep the faith – in God, in the angel, in the dreams, and even in Mary. 

 

The Cherry Tree Carol            Traditional English carol, arr. David Willcocks (1919-2015)

Performed by the Christ Church Youth Ensemble

Text: Joseph was an old man, an old man was he, when he wedded Mary, in the land of Galilee. And as they were walking through an orchard so good, where cherries and berries as red as any blood. O then bespoke Mary, with words both meek and mild: ‘Pluck me one cherry, Joseph, for that I am with child.’ ‘Go to the tree then, Mary, and it shall bow to thee; and you shall gather cherries by one, by two, by three.’ Then bowed down the highest tree unto our lady’s hand; ‘see,’ Mary cried, ‘see, Joseph, I have cherries at command.’ ‘O eat your cherries, Mary, O eat your cherries now; O eat your cherries, Mary, that grow upon the bough.’ Then Mary plucked a cherry, as red as any blood, then Mary went she homewards all with her heavy load.

 

POETRY READER:  

Winter Grace: A poem by Patricia Fargnoli:

If you have seen the snow

under the lamppost

piled up like a white beaver hat on the picnic table

or somewhere slowly falling

into the brook

to be swallowed by water,

then you have seen beauty

and know it for its transience.

And if you have gone out in the snow

for only the pleasure

of walking barely protected

from the galaxies, 

the flakes settling on your parka

like dust from just-born stars,

the cold waking you

as if from long sleeping, 

then you can understand

how, more often than not,

truth is found in silence,

how the natural world comes to you

if you go out to meet it,

its icy ditches filled with dead weeds,

its vacant birdhouses, and dens

full of the sleeping.

But this is the slowed-down season

held fast by darkness

and if no one comes to keep you company

then keep watch over your own solitude.

In that stillness, you will learn

with your whole body

the significance of cold

and the night,

which is otherwise always eluding you. 

 

 

An Advent Prayer

 

Presider: Help us to understand the words of the poet, that, “more often than not, truth is found in silence,” and “in stillness we shall learn with our wholebody the significance of cold and the night.” May your hidden shining never elude us, in night and in cold, in darkness and in waiting, that we may be restored to that place where we once met as shepherds at the stable after hearing the angels sing. Amen


R.A.I.H.N.

It's the giving season and time to reflect on why we give. Please let us remind you of all the wonderful reasons to choose RAIHN as the recipient of your end-of-year generosity: 

  • I love the bus drivers. They are really nice! (2016 family) 
  • I loved the RAIHN program. I just loved the staff and volunteers, as they really helped my family stay together during this tough time. (2016 family) 
  • I learned to save more money, share with others, and communicate. (2016 family) 
  • It is a great program. I like the fact that we were welcomed. We felt at home. (2016 family) 
  • RAIHN is here to help you, not carry you. (2015 family)
  •  You were the light at one of the darkest chapters of my family's life. Your kindness and encouragement has stayed with us to this day. (email received in 2016 from a 2012 family) 
  • Getting into RAIHN is like getting the golden ticket! (community case worker)

Please check your mail for the Annual Appeal letter. This is scheduled to hit mailboxes shortly after Thanksgiving. We truly appreciate your support as we assist homeless families to achieve sustainable independence by supporting them with tailored services, including shelter, food, personalized case management and a diverse network of caring volunteers. 

BTW - doing the dinner on Sunday was such an enjoyable time. These families are a joy to be with! (email from First Universalist meal coordinator) 

Please remember RAIHN when doing your holiday shopping! Click on the images above for AmazonSmile or GoodShop. By linking your accounts and selecting RAIHN as your chosen recipient, a portion of your purchase will be donated to RAIHN! 

RAIHN 34 Meigs St. 

Rochester, NY 14607

585-506-9050   

PLEASE HELP FILL THE FOOD CUPBOARD BASKET

The Pittsford Food Cupboard supplies over 4,000 households totaling over 9,400 people.  They provide food and other items to 6 different zip codes:  E Rochester, Pittsford, Brighton and 3 in Rochester.  Some items they are always in need of:

  • Pasta and pasta sauce
  • Canned fruits and vegetables
  • Hearty soups and tuna
  • Cereals

The items are dropped off to the food cupboard once a month.  The volunteers are always so appreciative. Thank you Christ Church for helping to fill the basket that is in the back of the church every Sunday.


Christ Church Finance Report

NEW NEWS-

Bulletin Insert from Finance Committee (beginning 11/13)

From the Finance Committee

Updated financial information is shown below, and always available via The Song and the bulletin board!

October YTD

  • Income:  $248,684
  • Expenses: $293,681
  • Deficit YTD: ($44,997)

Account Balances

  • Checking: $53,000
  • Fidelity: $378,150
  • Amsden Trust: $225,000
  • Flower Fund: $11,000

October News

The Grant Committee is thrilled to announce that Christ Church has been awarded $4,000 as the recipient of a Consulting Grant from the Sacred Sites Fund under the New York State Landmarks Conservancy. These funds will go toward engineering consulting to address issues with the Lawn Street façade. In January 2017 we will apply for a Sacred Sites Challenge Grant to help with the costs of the work associated with repairing the façade. Go Christ Church! (Still waiting to hear on our larger grant application to the NYS Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation … go light a candle!)

YAY!

update 10/21/2016-

From the Finance Committee

Updated financial information is shown below, and always available via The Song and the Christ Church bulletin board.

September YTD

  • Income:  $216,450
  • Expenses: $266,231
  • Deficit YTD: ($49,781)

September News

In response to a question from last month … inquiring about how we deal with the deficit … we lean on our reserves or “savings” account (just like at home!).

Work on the protective glass behind the Tiffany Chancel windows will begin the week of 10/24 and is sponsored, in part, by a grant from The Farash Foundation, for which we are very grateful. We are still waiting to hear on our grant applications to Sacred Sites and the NYS Office of Parks and Historic Preservation – watch this space!

The first of three grant applications has been approved!

Christ Church was notified that we won an Emergency Repair grant of $4,500 from the Farash Foundation for repairs to the protective glass covering our Tiffany windows in the chancel. Thank you to the Property and Grant Committees for your hard work, and THANK YOU to the Farash Foundation! Grant 1 successful, 3 more TBA!

Christ Church Finance 101

Welcome to the new school year from your Christ Church Finance Committee. Didn’t realize you’d signed up for the class this year? No problem, we’ll make it easy for you to get your homework in on time and to keep up with the class!

Let’s begin with a little bit of history, so we’re all reading from the same text (or singing from the same hymnal).  J

Financial State of Affairs

Do you ever sit in our beautiful sanctuary and wonder where your weekly contributions go? If not, take a quiet moment to look around and consider all that goes into keeping our doors open and the building sound. It’s a big place! And it’s aging! We offer tremendous programs to parishioners and guests alike. Just as you have bills and expenses at home, we have them here at Christ Church – heat, water, electricity, staff, programs, insurance – it all adds up.  

Over the course of the past two years we’ve lost a number of significant contributors who have either passed on or moved away, and that has had a very direct impact on our financial health. As of August 31, 2016 we had a deficit of $48,500, and it is growing.

These aren’t new expenses every month, just our cumulative income and expenses month-to-month.

Simply put, there’s more going out than coming in.

Taking Care of Our Home

Certainly one of our largest expenses is the physical plant, and the Property Committee has done a heroic job of prioritizing, negotiating and managing the significant repairs that are already underway. You know that from reading last week’s Bulletin Insert, right? The Vestry approved about $170,000 in repairs to cover this work, but the list of other, needed repairs continues to grow.

So, how do we, as a small parish, care for our historic space? In a few ways, actually. Read on …

Grants

A small group of parishioners came together in late spring to brainstorm and pursue grant monies. To-date we have submitted three (3) applications:

1. NYS Landmarks Conservancy/Sacred Sites Consulting Grant: an application for $5,250 to fund architectural consulting services for repairs to the Lawn Street façade, including a structural engineering review, solutions for permanent repair or rebuilding, and work with the State Historic Preservation Office. The Sacred Sites grant is a 50% match grant. A decision is expected in October.

2. NYS Environmental Preservation Grant: an application for $326,500 for additional repairs to the roof, window sills, repair of three clerestory windows, plaster repairs and completion of interior painting. The Preservation grant is a 75% match grant. A decision is expected in December.

3. Farash Foundation/Emergency Repair Grant: an application for $7,400 for repair of protective glass covering the Chancel Tiffany windows. Farash Emergency grants fund 100% of the repair.  (Update: Got this in October!)

Next up for the Committee will be an application for Sacred Sites for the work to fix the Lawn Street wall (50% of cost can be requested), as well as review of the potential for us to apply for a NYS “Main Street” grant.

Stewardship and Capital Campaigns

In addition to seeking financial support from funding agencies, we need to ask ourselves if we are doing everything we can to sustain our parish in our own giving.

A Stewardship Campaign will begin soon, and is especially important this year as we continue to seek grants. Erasing our deficit and achieving a balanced budget is attractive to grant organizations, and helps us to stretch our own funds.  

Beyond the Stewardship Campaign, another group of parishioners has begun work on a Capital Campaign. This Campaign will solicit financial support from both our own parish as well as the broader community in which we will live and serve.

Homework Assignment

We will be including a brief financial “snapshot” in the Bulletin from now on, so you’ll know how we’re doing. Your assignment is to stay up-do-date by reading the Bulletin and participating in the Stewardship and Capital Campaigns as they are launched.

Please feel free to contact a committee member for more information and/or feedback.

The Christ Church Finance Committee

  • Jeremy Cooney
  • Josie Dewey
  • Norm Geil
  • Meg Mackey
  • Ron Vukman

Christ Church Vestry Minutes

 

Minutes, September 20, 2016

1. A summary document regarding the history of how the Amsden Fund has been used was passed around and vestry members discussed proposals for the use of the funds in 2016-17.  

Resolution:  Amsden monies will be used to fund the Choral Scholar apprenticeship ($1500) and Music Scholar apprenticeship ($2500) for Spring 2017 was passed 7-3-1.

2. A St. John Fisher Student has applied and been accepted to teach Sunday School and lead Youth Group meetings.  The vestry discussed ways for raising money to pay the Sunday School teacher/Youth Group leader.  In the future it needs to be added as a line item to the Church budget. 

3. We are shorthanded for altar guild (acolyte, verger, servers).  Jim Bement and Bill Soleim will write in The Song to get the word out that we need people.

4.  John Ford, Joe McCutcheon, Mary Pietrzykowski will serve on the nominating committee along with Jim Bement and Bill Soleim and(two vestry members who are going off vestry) and Warden Deb VanderBilt.

5. Property report: Josie moved to appropriate $3500 for the protective glass covering the chancel windows; Peg Britt seconded.  Discussion pointed out that they put in two estimates for the work ($8000 and $4500) and Farash Foundation funded 100% of the lower estimate. Passed unanimously.

6. Stewardship Committee report: The committee has set up meetings with four groups that help with Capital Campaigns, including Klote Associates and the Episcopal Church Foundation – each will make a presentation to the steering committee. All groups offer readiness assessments that involve the entire church.  

Property & Finance Committees Report to the Christ Church Vestry (excerpts)

Submitted by Hugh E. Kierig, September 20, 2016

·         Yellow Jackets –  In August there was found to be an infestation of yellow jackets on the exterior of the Tower.  The recommendation at this time by the exterminators is to leave them alone for the end of the season and not take any action regarding their extermination.  Bero has reviewed the situation and believes there may be a need to do some mortaring of the stones to keep the yellow jackets out for next spring. 

·         Architects Review of Building Opportunities -  Several of us took Bero Architects on a tour of the church on September 15th.  A similar tour will be done with Dave Bienetti of SWBR Architects on September 21st .

·         Chancel, Narthex, and Other Lighting -  We have investigated lighting issues within the sanctuary including replacement of burnt bulbs, enhanced lighting in the Chancel and Narthex, and new lighting fixtures for the Narthex bulletin board.  Belliter Electric has recommended Newton Lighting to assist in recommendations regarding new lighting in the Chancel and light replacement in the Nave.  The current Chancel and Nave lights are old and replacement bulbs are no longer available.  Consideration will be given to LED lights which provide greater lighting with less energy and have a longer life.  Timing of these replacements will be timed when scaffolds are in place.

·         Protective Glass Covering for Chancel Windows – $8,000.  Grant approval from Farash Foundation was announced today for $4,500 for the replacement of protective glass panels to the Tiffany windows in the Chancel.  Our cost of the project will be $3,500.

·         North Aisle Roof Repair – $73,000.  The amount for this project is what was approved in May based on an estimate from Bero Associates.  From further discussions this summer with Bero, Swiatek, and the roof contractor, CSTM, it was determined that an investigation of the roof structure was necessary.  CSTM tore into the roof to see what was underneath, it was recommended by both Bero and CSTM that the existing roof be removed and be replaced at the original level.  This will lower the roof line by 12 inches thereby creating additional stormwater storage and reduce the likelihood of water infiltrating into the windows.  The new roof surface would be modified bitumen roofing and include new scuppers and downspouts.  (see attached cost breakdown)

o   Recommendation –

  • Demo existing roof and replace to original level - $39,100
  • Replace wood in clerestory window sills - $2,500
  • Exterior window carpentry and finishing - $6,810.
  • Alternate add-ons – new gutters from Nave roof, recoat roof over entrance - $2,000

Total - $50,310

·         Lawn Street Façade: The Property Committee met with Bero Architects regarding the engineering report for the Lawn Street façade.  A preliminary report indicated that the temporary bracing is substandard and not effective.  Through these discussions, additional information has been found (from original construction documents) and it is recommended that conversation with the engineer continue to address some of the structural concerns.  Bero will as well contact a local historical building mason to discuss costs for the repair of the façade.  A grant with Sacred Sites for repairs will be submitted this winter.

·         Gutter Work: Again, as part of the walk around, it was found that many of the downspouts were overflowing.  We believe that the storm water drainage system may be clogged and have asked a contractor to provide an estimate to investigate this problem. 

Minutes October 20, 2016

1. The Vestry discussed the possibility of petitioning the court to formally allow us to not exclude women from Amsden recipients (the will specifies “young men”). Wording we suggested was "Men and women being formally trained for ordained or lay ministry.” Lois Jones volunteered to find out what would be involved in this change.

2. Liaison Reports:  Kevin Finnigan reported that the church’s care team needs new volunteers. Kevin is the point person for this group.

3. Capital Campaign - Joe Schaller reported that meetings continue with capital campaign consultants:  Episcopal Church Foundation, Samantha Standing, and Global Group are scheduled for October/November.

4. Property Committee: The committee has determined that repair work to the sanctuary must be delayed until 2018, given how many weddings are already scheduled (and deposits paid) and Eastman events scheduled. 

5. The vestry finalized discussion to pay the Sunday School Teacher $625 from alternative funds. Motion passed unanimously.

6. Report on Lease with Catholic Family Center. Norm Geil prepared a sample lease for vestry to consider. We are approving the intent to lease and Norm will proceed with the approval.

Passed unanimously.


From the Archives

Thanks to the loan of books from Christ Church archivist Mary Schultz, The Song will be highlighting some excerpts about Christ Church history in this and future issues. We are fortunate to have two history books that were written about the church, Christ Church: A Story-Chronological, by Jane Marsh Parker, covering the years 1854-1905, andChrist Church Rochester: The First Hundred Years 1855-1955,  by James Demcey Hendryx.

Part IV     The Women of Christ Church 

The women of Christ Church are mentioned in the histories of Hendryx and Parker, and what they are mentioned for reflects the times very clearly.  No women are on the vestry; in fact, no women are in the choir in the list from 1905 (there’s a long list of sopranos, so those parts must have been sung by boys).  But women are in leadership positions in organizations that they created for work that was seen as appropriate to them at that time.

The first Ladies Society was established in 1855, the first year the church was established.

The Sewing Society of CC (originally called The Female Sewing and Benevolent Society) was an active fundraising organization, begun in 1894. It raised funds to pay for the Sunday School builing (1200 in 1861) and the corona in the now-chapel (1869).

Another area of leadership was the Board of Trustees of the Church Home. When it was organized in 1869, Mrs. Dewey, Mrs. Upton, Mrs JL Booth, Mrs. J Moreau Smith, Miss Marian Smith and Mrs. Edward Smith, all members of Christ Church.

Some women are specifically singled out for notice or praise from Hendryx: The first baptism was Eliza DeVinney, age 23, May 13, 1855.  Mrs. Charles Davis (mary Eleanor Welton) was the daughter of Rev. Alanson Welton, who was a missionary to the western part of the Diocese of New York.  Her daughter Charlotte was a pupil and then a teacher in the CC Sunday School for 50 years when she was celebrated for that at the Golden Jubilee in 1905, and her niece, Kate Elizabeth Davis, took over from her and taught until she died in 1947.

Lucy Sabey Winn and her husband Nathaniel Winn came to Christ Church in 1861, and built a house at 65 East Avenue. From that time until CC changed from bread to wafers for communion in 1905, all of the communion bread was baked in Lucy Winn’s kitchen. Their daughter, Ella Winn, was a member of the Parish Aid group, and as secretary from 1891 to 1929, she kept extremely detailed notes about parish life and James Hendryx calls them “the most complete history of [those] 38 eventful years.” (28).

Many of the mentions of women look like this: “Mrs. Frances Child had four daughters who all went on to become active CC members, as did their grandchildren: Mrs. D.M. Dewey, Mrs. Albert E. Walker, Mrs. Elbert Scrantom and Mrs. J.M Winslow.”  As was the custom, women are called by their husband’s name.  The single women are named with a first name, such as Eliza DeVinney, above. The women’s names from the list of Sunday School teachers in 1905 (most of which were women, and most of them were single women) is so evocative of the times: Julia, Anna, Isabel, Winifred, Ruth, Beulah, Louise, Sadie, Lily, Caroline, Charlotte, Gabrielle, Jennie, Carrie, Eleanor, Kate, and Margaret.  Not a Heather or Megan among them!

Michaelmas 2016

Christ Church Rochester                   Michaelmas   2016              The Song                             vol. 1      issue 6

St. Michael guards the Earth © 2005 Tim Jutsum  (above) acrylic on canvas

Angels, help us to adore him;

ye behold him face to face;

sun and moon, bow down before him,

dwellers all in time and space.

Alleluia, alleluia!

Praise with us the God of grace.

 

Praise My Soul the King of Heaven

Hymn 410         The 1982 Episcopal Hymnal

 

Gloria © 1982 M.V. Hill    pastel on paper

Editor note:

Michaelmas

Wow, what a summer, huh. Crazy hot. Lots of sun. The church had scaffolding stuffing the chancel and lining the narthex. The plaster in those two areas of the building got fixed. The narthex has been painted a deep rich color which was, as close as can be determined, its original hue over one hundred years ago. The windows pop out with a surprisingly fresh beauty, as though we never really saw them before. And the chancel, well, the chancel is breathtakingly beautiful. And, it’s not done, yet. All this happened as we celebrated the seemingly endless season of Pentecost/Trinity. And, that’s not done yet, either. 

We have arrived at the feast of St. Michael and All Angels, the start of the Michaelmas term for students in England and the return of routine life in church, work, and school, here. ’Time like an ever rolling stream” and all of that sort of thing. Yet, there doesn’t appear to be anything ordinary about the events that surround us. God has blessed us with the gift of living in a time unlike any other. It can feel ordinary, only because it is ours. Some churches even call this season “Ordinary Time”. We are the feet on the pavement which is, by the way, spinning at about 750 mph while the planet is zooming through the galaxy. And, we know this as ordinary information. I’m guessing that there is no such thing as ordinary.

We are alive in Christ. We are moving and changing along with our building, our culture and our world, as we reach for light and beauty and the power of God’s Spirit. Light is what makes things beautiful. We will be adding light in creative ways to the narthex and chancel. This newsletter is digital and web-based and changed many times over the summer. Every time we had something new to see or a new event, I put it here in the Song. I will continue to do that. This publication is alive and changes all the time, not just on the day of publication. Check back often to see if you’re keeping up. Contribute to the Song anytime and it will show up here. John McCallum took pictures of the transformation to scaffolding and back which included the dusting party. It was here. The ROCO art installation and party was, also. There will be babies baptized on November 6 at the Feast of All Saints. They will be here, too. There’s a lot to do and see. And, we haven’t even talked about angels, yet.

Val Jutsum

                                               Rector's Notes

Dear Christ Church,

We’ve been through a lot these past few months. You’ve worked with me to make our chancel beautiful and hoped with me that everyone will be delighted; you’ve advised me on how to finance the repairs of our historic landmark building, and you’ve put in endless hours on finance, property, grant writing, & models for a capital campaign. You’ve worked with me to find a new youth leader and Sunday School teacher, so we will welcome Emily Brennan! You’ve worked with me to find an office assistant to help Marianne, so we will welcome Kate Corbett!

You have shared your deeper concerns, and your deeper hopes, with me. You have wanted to be sure I know that we are, to a large extent, an aging congregation. On more than one occasion, you have expressed your hope that Christ Church will find ways to take care of its own, especially our aging and infirm. You have expressed a desire to pull everyone in to talk about how we can be even more active in driving, accompanying, including, and cooking for those of us who are not fully independent. 

You have expressed concern for those of us who are without families.

You and I have prayed for your adult children with cancer. You and I have prayed about your own illnesses and the treatments you are seeking. (I am troubled by the complexities you face as you navigate hospice and home health aide systems. I carry your anxieties with you and offer them to God daily, as well as your gratitude for your families and friends.) 

You have welcomed me at the side of your hospital beds; you have welcomed me at the side of your hospice beds; you have shared your prayer requests with me and one another.

You have welcomed one to the same places - into the places where you are vulnerable and need comfort.

You have come together to memorialize and bury – and have offered to do so again – those who would otherwise not have had a proper service or burial.

You and I celebrated your wedding vows and blessed your rings!

You and I are excited about a youth retreat to the Abby of the Genesee on the week-end of January 13th!

You and I are talking about racism at our vestry meetings, and wondering how we can expand the conversation. 

You and I are considering what a new Saturday week-night service might look like (Taize? Evening prayer? Said Compline?)

You and I are working on formalizing our partnerships with Eastman, The Father’s House, and Meal and More so that we are all working together more effectively. You and I continue to marvel at the different missions and ministries that happen on our grounds and in our building!

Together, we are learning how to be a community hub. Together, we are living out our call to be a mission hubto the glory of God. Together, we are reaching out to others who will support us and do God’s work with us.

You have told me that, even in this time of change, you feel the brightness God’s future for us. I do, too. 

The gold shining from the chancel ceiling and from the quatrefoils set against the dark– these remind me of a new star from heaven. Guiding us.

Ruth+

Some of the Swiatek Team on the top of the giant scaffold at the completion of the ceiling.

MUSIC NOTES FROM STEPHEN

Art and Music are thriving at Christ Church. Parish and community musicians of all ages are learning to work together to develop skills of ensemble and solo performance for liturgical music.  Through engagement in high-level process we learn great life lessons and become a repository of treasured timeless expression in art.  For centuries, the church has been a special place for people to create great works of art as an expression or affirmation.  It has also been a place where people are drawn to in order to be moved and transformed by art.  It is wonderful to know that so many of the great artistic expressions from the past thrive in our parish. A similar thing has come to life in the visual arts within our Chancel.  Looking at historical models of church art and architecture has led us to embark upon restoring the color palette and design that was typical to the Gothic revival in the 19th century.

The new season has begun for our music program. The 30-member Christ Church Choir has an extremely high-level of music making ability and we all have great fun working together.  The Schola Cantorum of 36 singers and instrumentalists will begin our season of Compline on Sunday, October 2nd at 9:00 PM.  Compline is sung each Sunday from October through April at 9:00 PM.  Candlelight Concerts precede Compline on the first Sunday of each moth.  Organist and harpsichordist Malcolm Matthews will perform this first concert with works by Bach, Buxtehuds, Bruhns, and Byrd.  A reception will follow Compline on this evening in the Guild Room.  The Christ Church Consort will perform within the 11:00 AM Sunday Eucharist on 4th Sundays and feast days. The Youth Ensemble has been rehearsing on Sundays following the Eucharist and will perform on Sunday, October 16 within the 11:00 AM Eucharist. Gwendelyn Hughes, Shirley Ricker, and I will be working together to develop some liturgical dramas for the youth to perform in this new season.

For more information about concerts and music events, please visit the Christ Church website: 

http://www.christchurchrochester.org/

You can also find the billboard of ongoing and special future events by going to the top of this section and clicking on the link "MUSIC GALLERY".

Here are just a few ways in which Christ Church members and friends may participate in our program:

• Becoming an Usher/Candle-lighter for Compline

• Make contributions to our Friends of Music Fund. This fund supports music at Christ Church.  It also enables us to provide musical outreach to the Rochester community through music-training programs, concerts, and enables us to enhance our liturgies with music.  

• Purchase our various CD recordings for friends and family members as gifts.

• Assist in publicizing music at Christ Church by helping sending emails to the local media

Please contact me if you are interested in participating in any aspect of our music program at Christ Church. Stephen Kennedy, Music Director stephenk@rochester.rr.com

You may also support our music education and enrichment opportunities for young musicians who are dedicating their lives to the field of sacred music by contributing to Christ Church’s "Friends of Music" fund.

Please continue to follow the musical life of our parish by reading the monthly Music Notes and Calendar that are emailed from my address  via MailChimp. 

-Click on the posters below for a full page view.

The music sound files contained here are from the new CD recordings that have just been released. These recordings are available for purchase by clicking the link below. The music used in this publication is edited.  

http://www.christchurchrochester.org/recordings-cd-shop

 

Other links of interest are:

https://www.facebook.com/ccscholacantorum/?fref=ts

https://www.facebook.com/ChristChurchRochester/?fref=ts

http://www.christchurchrochester.org

News and Events

The Latest Pictures of the Christ Church Chancel

The image in the top left is the concept drawing from the Tiffany Studio made over a century ago.   The other three photos show what our chancel looks like today. It is so beautiful, now, but anyone who wants the stonework can help to make that happen.

Cool News, Latest Happenings and Upcoming Events

I love Advent. At a time when the world we live in beckons us to rush into Christmas, with all of the wild rumpus frenzy the secular holiday has to offer, the church quietly and mysteriously begins a new year. In our home, as in many of yours, we shared the lighting of candles and the addition of the collect for the first Sunday in Advent to the beginning of our evening meal. It is blessed to say the prayer that begins with “give us grace to cast away the works of darkness and put upon us the armor of light”. One of the charming fashion accessories of the season is a wreath to surround the four candles marking the four weeks of the season. We will be building these wreaths together here at Christ Church on Saturday, November 26th, at 7pm. This is a dessert party rather than a dinner, which is a great way to polish off those last couple of slices of your award winning pie or whatever leftover you have from Thanksgiving. We will have warm cider, hot chocolate, evergreen branches, wreath frames, and wire. All you need to bring is a dessert to share, beads or ribbons or any other decoration (tiny toys?) of your choice. We will meet in Wilder Hall. This is an event for everybody, singles, families, couples, children, Everybody! It would be awesome if you were to r.s.v.p. I would prefer if you did so by going to the SONG website 

http://songforchristchurch.org/contact/         and sending a message from the contact box. I will also put a signup sheet in the hall.  I really hope to see you for a fun evening.

All Saints Day at Christ Church

 

This was a fabulous celebration with the baptism of four babies! They are Alaina Noelle Beighley Pack, daughter of Vicki Beighley and Brian Pack; Margaret Elizabeth Vogt, daughter of Carl and Sarah Vogt; Thomas Gibson Dugdale, son of Elizabeth and James Dugdale; and Kenneth James Purvis, son of Lauren and Jim Purvis. The pictures begin with baptism prep at the rector's house. The event was followed by cake at coffee hour. [photo credit- John McCallum]

 

MOST RECENT NEWS

 

Episcopal Relief and Development will be working through its local partners in Haiti, the Caribbean, and the US to provide assistance to people put out of their homes by the hurricane. Here are the contacts for making donations. Specify the hurricane fund.

 

Episcopal Relief & Development • 815 Second Avenue, New York, NY 10017

1-855-312-HEAL (4325) • www.episcopalrelief.org

 

You can also contribute to ERD when you shop at Amazon if you start at smile.amazon.com and choose ERD as your preferred charity. A small percentage of your purchase price will be donated to ERD.

Pray for peace. Pray for the safety of those in peril. Pray for prosperity for all those in need. Pray to be folded into the heart and mind of God.

O God, you made us in your own image and redeemed us through Jesus your Son: Look with compassion on the whole human family; take away the arrogance and hatred which infect our hearts; break down the walls that separate us; unite us in bonds of love; and work through our struggle and confusion to accomplish your purposes on earth; that, in your good time, all nations and races may serve you in harmony around your heavenly throne; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

EVENTS

Here at the EVENTS pages you will find some of the rich threads that make up the complicated and beautiful fabric of our lives here at Christ Church. 

Christ Church is famous for world class music and upcoming music events are displayed both in this section and in the MUSIC GALLERY.

The GALLERY is designed to be a prayer and meditation aid. It is the quiet envelope of Christ Church chapel. Set it to run during your times of praying the hours or when you want focus.

EVENTS and ANNOUNCEMENTS in This Issue

1.  Candlelight Concert

2. Food Cupboard

3. R.A.I.H.N.

4. School #9

5.  Financial News and Report

6. Vestry Minutes

7. Meet the VanDelinder Fellows

          8. From the Archives

Hills II ©2004 T. Jutsum