Lent 2019

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The SONG  CHRIST CHURCH  EPISCOPAL    

141 East Avenue Rochester, New York    

  Lent 2019

The Christ Church newsletter vol. 4 issue  3

 

http://www.christchurchrochester.org - our website

https://www.facebook.com/ChristChurchRochester/ - our Facebook page

Weekly Services 

( see below for Lenten Schedule)

Holy Eucharist in the Episcopal Tradition

The Very Rev. Ruth Ferguson- Rector

The Rev. Peter W. Peters Ph.D.- Priest in Residence

Stephen Kennedy - Music Director

Sunday- 8:00 am (spoken)

Sunday- 11:00 am Choral (with Music)

To hear a recorded service click on the “Events, Bulletins and Service Audio” link above and scroll down to a collection of recorded services

Tuesday Pipes- 12:00 noon

A World Class organ concert at lunchtime every Tuesday

Thursday- 12:00 noon (spoken)

Sunday evening

9:00pm Sung Compline (October-May)

1st Sundays- Candlelight Concert at 8:30 followed by Compline

3rd Sundays- Lecture Series at 8:00 followed by Compline

sung by the Christ Church Schola Cantorum directed by Stephen Kennedy

To hear a sample of Compline scroll down to the video near the bottom of this page or click here:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y75c3aIg3nI

Christmas & Epiphany 2018/2019

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CHRIST CHURCH            CHRISTMAS  & EPIPHANY 2018/19

Rochester, NY                      The SONG                            vol. 4 issue  2


141 East Avenue Rochester, New York


 

http://www.christchurchrochester.org

https://www.facebook.com/ChristChurchRochester/

 

Holy Eucharist in the Episcopal Tradition

Sunday- 8:00 am (spoken)

Sunday- 11:00 am Choral (with Music) under the direction of Stephen Kennedy

Thursday- 12:00 noon (spoken) Sunday evening

9:00pm Sung Compline (October-May)

Editors note:

Shepherds and straw; traveling seers from far away places to the east, and camels; valuable gifts, and portents in the sky; signs, and murder; angels proclaiming miracles, and loving parents (one ecstatic and one conscripted, both fully committed); these same parents becoming refugees fleeing so that their destiny would be fulfilled; this, this is the start to the season we are in. 

The thing about REAL LIFE, its events and the consequences of them, is that it is not what we thought would happen. Come on, think about it.  Almost everything in your past, all of our pasts, those things that have actually happened to us are things that, if someone had said that this was what would happen, this is where we would find ourselves, we wouldn’t have dreamed it. We wouldn’t have believed it. This goes for the beautiful and the horror filled. It is almost the defining feature of the really real. 

The real parents, Mary and Joseph of Nazareth, said yes to God and had no idea how that was going to play out. Just like us. They believed that God would take care of them and then had to travel for a census ordered by a tyrant. They ended up having, arguably the most cosmic birth of all time, in a barn. They were visited by both the least admired humans, shepherds, and the most exalted of the heavenly beings, angels, possibly concurrently. Then the rich strangers with valuable presents came, presumably after the new little family had left the barn. And everything, absolutely every super weird thing, was nothing like what they had thought might happen. 

The unending refrain as they escaped to Egypt was God telling them that they belonged to Him because He belonged to them in a way they could never guess. They could never have believed it would happen this way. It was Real.

We have Epiphany because God sings the same song to us. It is the song that proclaims that we belong to God and He belongs to us and this has nothing to do with how we imagined it, not as individuals nor cultural or ethnic groups. I personally think that the identifying qualities we cling to, that we think make us special, our privileges, cultures and histories, are ridiculous cheats compared to the glorious inheritance which we are being called into, although admittedly, the whole thing looks kind of incredible. We weren’t supposed to be chosen. God had already picked a people and had branded a culture. We weren’t it. 

It turned out more real and less expected. It turned out to be more like God. Bring anyone in. Give everything to anyone who will receive it. Fill every corner with light. No previous experience is required to belong. 

We find ourselves in a world we can’t control, in a history we never expected, and a lot of it is alarming. We are saying yes to God which means we have abandoned whatever we thought might happen, to travel wherever we find ourselves, in Him, with each other. We are embracing the Real together and we are using our faith to do it. Happy Epiphany.

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New Years Day

Feast of the Holy Name

Eucharist 10:00 am

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A letter from Ruth our rector

Dear Ones!

My writing (and your receiving) a rector's report from my medical leave is new terrain for us, isn't it? Of course I would prefer to look out and see your faces, and have us all sing something like the doxology, because not only do we sing it well and in such lovely harmony when we sing it a cappella, but also because there is NEVER a time NOT to be singing our praise and gratitude - even with the world in the state it's in, even on an arctic cold Sunday morning when pews may be a little emptier than we'd like, even when the rector is on medical leave, even when the healing we or our loved ones so need does not seem imminent or obvious, we sing gratitude for God's blessings. The children of God have sung this way for millennia and the darkness has never overcome it. We  belong to God, we belong to each other, and we are not alone in this endeavor we call "Church." We are all of us being led deeper and deeper into the glory of God and nothing can ever take that away.

 As I write, I've completed a week of a new IV antibiotic that is targeting one of the co-infections that came with the Lyme infection. The ticks in upstate New York are rather generous with the pathogens they pass on, so I will, in this 2019 rector's report, ask that you learn as much as you can about tick borne disease. "Lyme disease" denotes only one of the bacteria a tick might transmit, but there are other infections that are commonly transmitted along with Lyme, and compound the healing process. I am lucky to have a specialist who knows about these co-infections and which antibiotics to use for them. Here are two good websites for learning about tick borne disease. 

https://www.lymedisease.org/

https://www.ilads.org/ 

I'd never thought any part of my calling on earth would have to do with raising awareness of ANYTHING to do with ticks and pathogens, but there you have it. This disease will have marked me forever, as it has so many others, even and especially as I heal. I want my congregation to know the dangers of  tick borne illness,especially as upstate New York is a Lyme endemic area. I want you to be aware and safe.

 Last week I went the the Canandaigua Firehouse to meet with the Lyme Support Group there and with Senator Helming, the republican senator who is on a tick borne disease working group. She heard our stories and gathered information. We were a diverse group in terms of age, social economic class, and politics. I have to tell you,  I cannot think of when I've last, if EVER, experienced such deep bonds between democrats and republicans. And in such close physical proximity! I am co-leading an effort with a Republican to write both republicans and democrats to raise research money for researching, testing, and diagnosing tick borne disease. On the phone last week, we agreed we didn't have to think of the other as a member of a different political party. When I return to Christ Church, I want us all to take up the work of not seeing our own humanity or that of others according to political parties. I hadn't fully known how detrimental and dehumanizing it can be when we wear our political affiliations with a mark of pride or let them in any way define us and others. The kingdom of God just doesn't look like that.

I look forward to being with you soon! We're still on target for a full return in May, but, given my good progress, I may begin a slow and part time return as early as March. The Bishop, my good doctor, and I will be in communication about when and how as I continue to regain my strength. In the mean time, I give YOU my gratitude for being church to one another, the neighborhood, and the world. I cannot WAIT to rejoin you in that enterprise. 

Yours in Christ,

Ruth+ 

From Peter our Priest in Residence

And the Word became flesh….

Many scholars believe that John’s Gospel was written near the ancient city of Ephesus, one of the most important Roman cities in Asia.   It was famous for its Temple of Diana.   The shrine was an important economic engine for the city. You may recall that St. Paul incurred the anger of ‘investors’ when people turned from this religion to the Christianity.  (See Acts 19) Diana was a goddess associated with the fertility of the earth.  Religious rites included a wide variety of rituals, including sacred prostitution, in order to encourage good seasons for the farming communities of the surrounding countryside.   It was a religion that focused on the vitality of nature and its cyclical generation and would have made great sense to a people dependent upon agriculture.  It is a bit like our own age’s dependence upon commerce at Christmas. Imagine our reaction if a new religion came to town that led people to turn away from the consumer frenzy of this season!

But not all the people of the ancient world were comfortable with such extravagant and sensuous form of religion.  Some sought a more reflective way of engaging the meaning of life. They were known as Stoics.  Stoicism, was mainly a Greek religious point of view, but adopted by many of the Roman elite.  It focused on the rational order of creation, and the capacity of the human mind to embrace and understand the order of existence.   Central to this philosophy/religion was the notion of the λογοσ—the rational source of existence.  For Stoics, the rational capacity of humankind was a unique quality that prepared them for union with God.  The ultimate state of human achievement was pure thought.   It was a religious view that sought to escape the messy fleshy side of human existence and transport itself to the realm of ideas.

Imagine then the scandal of a teaching that identified the Word (λογοσ) as flesh! New Testament scholar Raymond Brown comments, “…instead of supplying the liberation from the material world that the Greek mind yearned for, the Word of God was now inextricably bound to human history.”  Here in this brilliant prologue, the author of the fourth Gospel joins a Greek concept with a radically Hebrew notion.   For the Hebrew mind God’s Word was always active in creation and in history.   God’s Word energized and directed creation.   There was also in Hebrew thought the idea that God’s Word could take on human form, and so in the Wisdom literature (e.g. Proverbs) God’s Word takes on the form of σωφια, Wisdom and is personified as a woman.

In short John is setting the stage for the idea that the God who is known in, but beyond all of creation, and the God who acted in history, yet always beyond history, and the God whose very essence is λογοσ is to be known in the person of Jesus.   In this profound prologue to his Gospel, John brings together the full mystery of the idea that God is the aspiration of our highest rational possibility, and that God is present in the fullness of human flesh.   The religion that springs from this encounter neither seeks to escape from the world, nor is it ready to simply accommodate with the world.   God in the flesh is a transformational encounter–God who dwells among us is one who engages and changes us.   This God is not the end of a chain of speculation, but a person with whom we engage in dialogue.

And what does John say of this Word made flesh?  It is full of grace and truth.   In other words, Jesus is the embodiment of God’s grace and a visible expression of God’s truth.   Here are some examples found in John’s Gospel:

  • Grace - Woman of Samaria

Peter, after the betrayal

  • Truth - Not an intellectual idea, but a radical encounter: You shall know the truth and the truth shall make you free. (8:32) 

     I am the way, the truth and the life. (14:6)  

     What is truth? (18:38) 

     Truth involves commitment - the decision to respond to the revelation of God, as it is known in Jesus. There is a warning in this Gospel - v10 not all will receive this truth - Pilate, the authorities....

In the end, the Word made flesh is a mystery, and for John there was also the mystery of faith that saw the truth of this claim.

John is offering a creative coming together of both Greek and Hebrew terms in the doctrine of the incarnation.  (NB this doctrine is about the becoming of flesh - not becoming a man.)   John is arguing that God’s eternal Wisdom has taken on physical form and shape in the person of Jesus. God who is embodied in Jesus has made all aspects of being human a gateway to the sacred.

Christmas, the season of the Incarnation, is about our grasping the transcendent mystery of God in the particular life Jesus.  It is a discovery of heaven joined to earth, and earth joined to heaven.  It takes us beyond our fleshly existence, while not denying it.  It profoundly deepens our fleshly reality, while moving us beyond it.  In short, the Word–the very essence of God, becomes flesh–the concrete and visible possibility of a new creation.

Writing about this theological theme Evelyn Underhill says: The Incarnation means that the Eternal God enters our common human life with all the energy of His creative love, to transform it, to exhibit to us its richness, its unguessed significance; speaking our language, and showing His secret beauty on our own scale.  I really like the phrase, that God wants us to know all of the “unguessed significance” of our lives and of the lives of those we encounter. We are in touch with a holy dimension when we see others and ourselves full of unguessed significance. In short, we can never write ourselves or anyone else off as hopeless.

What this means for us is that no aspect of human life is beyond God’s embrace.  We are reminded of this in our Baptismal covenant when we say that we will seek and serve Christ in all persons and that we will respect the dignity of all people.

Today we as a people need to remember that God’s embrace includes all people—this means:

  • The prisoner and those re-entering society from prison.

  • The addict and those in recovery.

  • The homeless for whatever reason. 

  • The mentally ill and those healing from mental illness.

  • The youth on our streets, gang members, and those who long to belong somewhere.

  • Those who face a New Year without hope or direction.

  • The homebound who feel cut off from community.

  • As well as all of us who feel blessed to be a part of this community where we welcome all to this table.

I have been reading Michelle Obama’s book Becoming.  At one point, after describing the struggle of being the wife of a presidential candidate, she determined to focus on making personal connections with people around her and then says, “I’ve learned that it’s harder to hate up close.”  This is what it means for the Word to become flesh.

And the Word became flesh and lived among us… May all of us in the coming new year find new ways of discovering God’s fleshly dwelling in ourselves and in all whom we meet so that we too may learn to say, we have seen grace and truth at work.  Amen.



Peter +

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This is a setting of the "Our Father" by Scott Perkins our former Assistant Director. Thatcher Lyman is heard here as the solo voice. Thatcher is our present Assistant Director. Scott's work may be purchased via this link: http://www.scott-perkins.com/store/th... Audio/Video by Mobile Audio Productions by Michael Sherman “The Christ Church Schola Cantorum… sings beautifully.” Fanfare, Jan/Feb 2010. Founded in 1997 by Stephen Kennedy, the Schola performs the Office of Compline at Christ Church Rochester NY, Sunday evenings, October through April. First-Sunday Candlelight Concerts and Compline was named “The coolest, most unusual music experience in the city…” in Rochester Magazine’s “Our Top Picks of 2014.” This acclaimed ensemble is also an early music laboratory through engagement of historic rehearsal and performance practices. The Schola specializes in Gregorian chant, Renaissance and Baroque choral music, and choral improvisation. It has collaborated with Manfred Cordes and Weser-Renaissance Bremen, Boston Early Music Festival Chamber Players, and organists Edoardo Bellotti, Hans Davidsson, David Higgs, Olivier Latry, William Porter, Joris Verdin, and Harald Vogel. The Schola has been a favorite of festivals and concert series, notably at the annual international Eastman-Rochester Organ Initiative. APM's Pipe Dreams, Minnesota Public Radio, and WXXI’s With Heart and Voice regularly broadcast tracks, via NPR, from the Schola's CDs. With organists Edoardo Bellotti and Stephen Kennedy, the Schola and dual organs performed a “guided improvisation” accompaniment to Carl Dryer’s 1928 silent classic La Passion de Jeanne d’Arc for Eastman's 2014 EROI Festival and the University of Rochester's interdisciplinary UCIS Cluster on Music and Film. The Schola’s latest CD is of 19th century French choral music with Belgian keyboardist Joris Verdin on Eastman's vintage Mustel harmonium. The Schola is comprised of Rochester-area musicians, Eastman School of Music faculty and students, and RIT faculty. Participation in the Schola is offered for course credit at the Eastman School of Music.

Notes from Stephen Kennedy


Christ Church Music Program Report for Annual Meeting 2019

Presented to the parish by Lydia Worboys

Christ Church Music Program Report for Annual Meeting 2019

Report by Stephen Kennedy Music Director
Christ Church Rochester

Christ Church’s music program is rich and varied. Our music is for both active and passive participation. It embraces the traditions of our heritage as well as music of our present time. Our liturgical music education programs gives distinction to our parish and fosters mutual enrichment and transformation to the community. This program involves our entire parish and it is well worth celebrating. Whether chanting or singing a hymn, listening to a voluntary, or honing a motet in a rehearsal, we are all participating in something important together as a family. We are grateful for the support of Ruth Ferguson (Rector), The Rev. Peter W. Peters, Deborah Vanderbilt, Norm Geil, and Kyle Liddell (Executive Committee), our Vestry, Pat Knapp (Parish Secretary), and Moses Roland (Sexton). We also want to thank David Higgs and William Porter (Associate organists) for contributing so generously of their time and talent to our community. They also help with mentoring and teaching our parish musicians and VanDelinder Fellows. Additional thanks to Sarah Johnson (Assistant organist and VanDelinder Prize Winner for 2018-19), Luke Brennan, and Henry Webb, for great music making and leadership. Gwyneth Paker (Eastman-Christ Church Choral Scholar), Gabriella Higgins (Choral Scholar), and Thatcher Lyman (Music Scholar and Assistant Director of the Schola Cantorum) also contribute greatly to our parish. We thank Lydia Worboys, John Kirkpatrick, and Peter Schoellkopff (cantors), Christopher Huebner (Schola librarian and coordinator), Carlos Mercado (CC Choir Librarian), as well as our dedicated teem of Compline Ushers who keep the church friendly and safe for the weekly Compline congregation of between 250-375 each Sunday night. Continued thanks and appreciation to the dedicated members of our parish ensembles as listed at the end of this document:

Opportunities for you to participate more in our Music program

1. Become a Compline ushers and Candle-lighters
2. Become a Greeter at Tuesday Pipes. Alan Jones is our regular greeter, and others are welcome 3. Volunteer to help send publicity to media via e-mail
4. Help with Compline set up each Sunday following the 11:00 a.m. Eucharist
5. Help assist us is searching for grants as well as writing them.
6. Donate to Christ Church “Friends of Music” Fund
7. Purchase Christ Church CD recordings as gifts for your friends

9 Goals and objectives:

  1. Attract more people to Christ Church through our music program - Goal on target

    • Created the 3rd Sunday Lecture Series prior to Compline.

    • Compline attendance continues to grow each year.

    • CC ensembles have more members than ever.

  2. Raise the level of musicianship in CC ensembles - Goal on target

• This ongoing goal is being realized in both the Christ Church

Choir as well as the Schola Cantorum.


  1. Raise community awareness of our high quality and diverse music program - Goal on target

    • Video/audio recordings of the Schola Cantorum in 2017 allowed

      us to begin a Youtube presence with thousands of people around

      the world viewing these posts.

    • Music Director sends Email marketing ads to “Friends of Music” donors

      4 times a month to advertise Candlelight Concerts & Compline,

      As well as the 3rd Sunday Lecture Series.

    • Music Director creates Facebook postings on the parish page as well as

      the Schola Cantorum page each week.

    • Music Director publicizes weekly Compline, Candlelight Concerts, and the

      3rd Sunday Lectures in the D&C and the City Newspaper.

  2. Foster the education and training of musicians in liturgical music skills - Goal on target

• This ongoing goal is being realized through our VanDelinder Fellows Program and our positions of ESM Choral Scholar, Christ Church Choral Scholar, and Music Scholar. Student composers also work with Music Director to hone compositions for CC ensembles for performance in our liturgies. Members in both ensembles are becoming skilled in chanting Lessons, readings and prayers in liturgies.

5. Engage people from the larger community (non-parishioners) to help fund our parish music program - Goal on target

• Non-parish donors from the Rochester Community as well as from around the country help fund our music program “wish list” items such as purchasing two choirs of Renaissance Sackbuts for performing motets in the historic colla parte Tradition. Christ Church Rochester, may be the only ensemble in the world where this practice is fostered weekly.

6. Install professional recording equipment in the church to record CC Choir, and the Schola in CC liturgies, and concerts -Goal attained

• Christ Church worked with ESM to pay for the installment of microphones
In the Sanctuary for recording CC ensembles. These recordings are used
For educational purposes and are posted on Facebook and soon on youtube.

7. Program Fundraising - Goal on target

  • Our parish operating budget funds only a small fraction of our music
    program budget, so we need to fundraise and write grants for program income. Please consider assisting the Music Director in this area.

  • SCHOLA and Organ CD recording sales have raised over $13,000 since 2004.


8. Strengthen existing community collaborations and partnerships in music - Goal on target

• We have been working with the Wardens to create an online calendar so that scheduling conflicts do not occur with partners such as the ESM Organ Department.

  • ESM advertises Compline in “Eastman Notes” magazine and events calendar.

  • Community leaders are invited to present 3rd Sunday Lectures.

  • Tuesday Pipes (collaborative series) brings about 60 people into CC each Tuesday

9. Enriching and transforming community -Goal on target

  • Music ensembles are a microcosm of the parish. They enrich and transform all who participate in them as well as the congregation that experiences the music that they make. This is especially evident at CC because
    of our tradition of mutual reciprocity of music and liturgy.

  • The wider community is especially attracted to Compline which is one of the Highest attended services in Rochester.



Members of the Christ Church Choir

Soprano

Kristy Liddell
Carol Manuel
Gwyneth Paker (ESM Choral Scholar)
Lisa Pigut
Liza Sommers
Hanna Sommers

Mary Anne Wickett

Alto

Shana Clark
Cynthia Qiyue He
Gabriella Higgins (Choral Scholar)
Sarah Johnson (Assistant Organist)
Sonja Shelton
Lydia Worboys (Cantor)
Joan Hunt

Alix Zanibbi

Eleanor Peet

Tenor

Luke Brennan (Fellow)

Thatcher Lyman
Bruce Manuel
Carlos Mercado (Librarian)

Mary Schultz

Bass

Benjamin Doane

Jonathan Falk
John Kirkpatrick (Cantor)

Kyle Liddell
Steven Metcalfe
Henry Webb (Fellow)

Zane Xiao
Yan Yue
Richard Zanibbi

Report by Stephen Kennedy Music Director


Members of the Schola Cantorum

Soprano

Glenna Curren Katie Harmer Aika ito (historic violin)

Käthe Wright Kaufman Sarah McConnell Amanda Mole

Mary Mowers Melissa Palfey Liza Sommers (historic violin)

Amy Steinberg Jared Wallis (cornetto)

Alto/Countertenor

Ben David Aronson (sackbut) Sarah Johnson James Kealey

Professor Honey Meconi Tim Tianyi Ren Lydia Worboys

Tenor

Luke Brennan Benjamin Henderson Isaac hutton

Thatcher Lyman (Assistant director) David Marshall Malcolm Mathews (organist)

Jacob Montgomery Jordan Moore (sackbut) Dale Nickell

Chris Petit Trevor Scott Okawa Tai Chuan Tan

Russell West Alden Wright Stephen Zugelder (Tenor sackbut)

Bass

Mark Ballard Oliver Brett (organ) Dillon Downey(Bass sackbut)

Isaac Drewes Joshua Ehlebracht Jonathan Falk

Noah Fields (historic Viola) John Kirkpatrick Professor Michael E Ruhling

Peter Schoellkopff Henry Webb Haotian Yu

Yan Yue Christopher Huebner (Librarian and coordinator)

Compline team of Ushers & Candlelighters:

Lucy Alanzo Robert Crumrine Kathryn Jospe Pru Kirkpatrick Kristy Liddell
Kyle Liddell Sonja Shelton Hannah Sommers Marti StGeorge


Stephen Kennedy
Music Director

stephenk@rochester.rr.com

 

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Attention: The Annual Meeting

took place directly after the 11:00am Eucharist

You can listen to the recording below. The following parishioners were elected to the positions indicated.

Write here…







 

Advent 2018

“How beautiful are the feet of those who bring good news!” Romans 10:15;

How beautiful upon the mountains are the feet of him who brings good news, who publishes peace, who brings good news of happiness, who publishes salvation, who says to Zion, “Your God reigns.”

Isaiah 52:7

CHRIST CHURCH    ADVENT  2018

Rochester, NY   The SONG        vol. 4 issue  1

in This Issue

Candlelight Concert and Compline

Third Sunday Lecture Series and Compline

Ordination of Padraic Michael Collins-Bohrer

The Open House at Christ Church 11/10/18

East Ave Grocery Run (for Meal and More)

Parish Necrology 2018

The Beloved Dead of the Parish from the All Saints Day prayers 2018

Latest Sunday Bulletin and Audio of the 11:00 am Eucharist

(when you click on an image below it will become full size and you can scroll through the pages)

Vestry Minutes

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Paddy’s ordination was a wonderful event

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Lessons and Carols

December 7, 2018 at 7:00 pm

The Open House at Christ Church 11/10/18

East Ave Grocery Run (for Meal and More)

Parish Necrology 2018

All Saints Day - The Beloved Dead of the Parish

Vestry Minutes October 16, 2018

 Property Discussion: Lawn Street Wall Update

John Fields reported on several meetings with Bero Architecture and potential contractors.

The engineer would like to tear down the ceilings and examine what is there. That will mean access will be lost to the basement, first, and second floor hallways. Work could begin in February. Due to the nature of the work, windows in the hallway will look more boxed in. Also, hallways on all levels will necessarily be narrower. The Vestry should be prepared for a request for allocation of funds before the next meeting. The Vestry thanked John for all of his efforts.

 Capital Campaign: Tom Foster, Nancy Norwood, and Dan Meyers have joined the committee.

 Stewardship Report from Pru Kirkpatrick via Carolyn Mauro

• Announcement in church bulletin for a Stewardship Church Supper Saturday, November 17, 6:30pm. Sign up poster will be in the hallway. List two favorite hymns on sign upsheet.  Sing a-long after dinner.

 Property Discussion: Kyle reported. There is a bat problem in the sanctuary and sacristy. There is a pigeon problem in the bell tower. There is a very real health concern, in both instances, and aconcern about damage to the organs. Bell repair cannot be attended to, due to pigeon mess. There is also an aesthetics issue. Everyone agreed as to the urgency of remedying the current situation, as well as endeavoring toward a solution which will stand the test of time.

    Kyle and John Fields have received estimates from exterminators, and are seeking more. The Vestry should be prepared to entertain a request for funding before the November meeting.

 Finance Report: Report from the Treasurer

Income was about $270,700 and expenses were about $265,700 which resulted in a surplus of about $5000.  The projected budget deficit was about $26,000.  Incomeincreased by about $26,300 and expenses increased by about $27,700.

 Report on RPD Security Visit: Meg presented a 9 page document entitled Assessment Completed by Crime Prevention Officer Vincent Agnone of the Rochester Police Department. 

 A group working on security, including Moses Roland, met with Officer Agnone. After inspection, Officer Agnone concluded the we are actually doing quite well in terms of security, but there are recommendations for improvements, especially in the areas of lighting; key access; blocking off access to areas where appropriate; and, practice in emergency preparedness.

 Kyle will price out different key options ( i.e. key, keypad, swipe ).

 Meg will see if the RPD officer is available to do a Sunday church security meeting for all interested.If so, Meg will get permission from Eastman to use the sanctuary for such a meeting.

 Warden’s Report: Deb 

The tree sculpture will be inspected by a qualified outside individual. If it passes inspection and is up and running by October 28, it will stay up until January 4. 

 Jim reported that he and Norm Geil, Treasurer, will be meeting with the tenant this week.

 Respectfully submitted by Dave Jutsum, Clerk of the Vestry

Vestry Minutes September 18, 2018

 

Present: Deborah VanderBilt and Kyle Liddell, Wardens;  Margaret Britt,  Meg Mackey,  James Kurmis, Carolyn Mauro,  Lucie Parfitt,  Valerie Jutsum, Vestry.  Excused:  Rev. Ruth Ferguson, Rector. Jeremy Cooney, Joseph Schaller, Vestry.  Guests:  Vicki McCutchon,  Weddings;  Bleu Cease, Executive Director/Curator of Rochester Contemporary Art Center;  Norman Geil, Treasurer. Dave Jutsum, Clerk.

 

Action Points:

 1. Kyle will modify website tab to indicate that we are not scheduling weddings now, because of renovations.

2. Norm and Jim are setting up a meeting with the tenant at the beginning of October.

3. At the October Vestry meeting we will talk about the early payment of our diocesan loan.

4. Lucie will set up a time for a meeting to discuss a “boilerplate” or “elevator speech” in anticipation ofquestions asked at the Gala. 

5. Meg will meet with Finance in the matter of how to direct Pat in the manner of paying Ruth as she changes to new Leave status. She will also discuss this with Ruth.

6. Deb will contact Canon to the Ordinary Johnnie Ross, requesting a special meeting with the Vestry. The subject is the choice of a Priest in Residence during Ruth’s absence on Disability Leave from October 2018 through the end of April 2019.

7. Deb will address VOC issue having to do with a) the garden/tree; and, b) Ruth’s absence.

8. A challenge for October meeting is to determine who has keys to various spaces in the church building.

 The meeting was chaired by Deb. Jim opened with prayer. Peg acted as timekeeper.

 Report on Weddings:

Vicki McCutchon is stepping down as Wedding Coordinator. Here is a brief synopsis:

 -We have four more weddings this year. 

-Vicki never scheduled more than a year ahead.

-We are not scheduling weddings now, because of planned renovations to Lawn Street wall. Kyle will change this tab on the website. Pat our Secretary needs to be prepared with what to tell couples when they call. 

1-A new Coordinator or Team must be skilled at scheduling weddings, coordinating with Eastman”sneeds for the building.

-We average 10- 15 weddings a year. The website and Jazz Fest were about tied for attracting new weddings, along with people who had attended weddings at Christ Church.

-Vicki’s labor of love in this endeavor over the past eight years was acknowledged as a very special gift to her parish. She, in turn, acknowledged help from Maryanne, Pat, Moses, and Stephen Kennedy.

 Update by Bleu Cease:

The Kalpa Tree Art Exhibit has been plagued by problems from day one. Bleu offered a heartfelt apology for the current state of affairs, and all that has contributed to it. November 5 is the firm date for the end, and repairs to grass and sidewalk will be made at no expense to Christ Church.

 Capital Campaign Report: Lucie announced that Jessica Toner has regretfully stepped down as paid consultant due to personal reasons, as of October 12. The next steps are to transition Jessica’s tasks to the committee; continue planning the November 10 Gala; and, interview and hire a Foundation and Major Gift Consultant. In short, Jessica was instrumental in lending credibility and expertise to the campaign. She got us to this point, which is a good one, and where we are supposed to be. Jessica has left us on good terms. As the campaign moves into its next phase, the rest of her allocated salary can be spent on someone whose abilities also lend themselves to the more focused tasks ahead. The job description has been written. Meanwhile, Lucie is developing a boilerplate in anticipation of questions to be asked at the Open House. She will set up a time for that to be discussed.

 Finance Report: Norm Geil provided a report on church finances. We are still in a slight budget surplus due to diocesan grant. 

 The two major topics discussed were: 1) an analysis of Ruth’s salary and benefit payments. under both short and long term absence. 2) Strategies necessary for the establishment of a lease and necessary repairs for the apartment in the church building.

    As to Ruth’s salary and benefits, there are complicated formulas for short term leave. These then change into something else altogether when short term changes to long term. Naturally, there are ramifications vis a vis the budget. The Parish budget then potentially affects Diocesan financial relationships. Meg will discuss with Ruth, and with the Finance Committee, the finer details of how this will go. Our church Secretary, Pat, must also be brought on board in regards to her participation in the endeavor of paying our Rector for this interim period.

    As for the apartment, Norm and Jim will meet with the tenant in early October. The purpose of this discussion is to communicate to our tenant that he is welcome to stay, under the following conditions: he is paid ip in full; he agrees to signing a lease for $750 per month, starting January 1; and, that necessary repairs will be made

 At this point, Deb took the opportunity to thank the Vestry for their participation in the Newcomer’s Dinner. It was a big success.

 Property Report: Kyle reported that as soon as we have a bid number for the Lawn Street Wall Repair, Property will meet with the Capital Campaign to discuss costs. Our roofer says that the roof is holding steady, currently.

 Vestry Liaison Reports: 

Stewardship: Carolyn volunteered to act as liaison with the Stewardship Committee. Carolyn will bring the plans for the Every Member Canvas to the October Vestry meeting. Other members of Stewardship are Pru Kirkpatrick and Cathy Brennan.

 Worship: Carolyn provided the following report:

Vestry Liaison Report – Carolyn Mauro – Christ Church Rochester

 Worship Committee

 Altar Servers – Eric Mackey – 

 Ushers – Joe McCutchon -  (1) The ushers continue to serve with a faithful and responsible group of volunteers. However it would be nice to be able to add a couple of new ushers to serve once a month or be ready to fill in when needed. The 11:00 am service usually has two ushers and we invite someone from the congregation to help present the bread and wine along with the plate collection at offertory. (2) Also, there in an announcement currently in the service leaflet about how the offertory is more participatory with only two plates and one can expect to have to pass the plate if needed. (3) Additionally, the ushers look forward to a security review along with the vestry and a representative from the Rochester police department later this month. 

 Altar Guild – Bill Soleim

 Lectors – Kevin Finnigan -  The Lectors/Intercessors have little to report.  We've added one new person to our ranks.  We could use some more, so an appeal from the the altar at announcements would be appreciated .  Aside from this, no news.  —Kevin Finnigan 

 Choir – Carlos Mercado - We have been a classroom for organ students, singers, conducting students, and two choral ensembles – the Parish Choir and the Schola Cantorum.  we are also the beneficiary of a fund established under the Will of long – time parishioner, Roy A. Vandelinder, Jr. , established to provide specialized training for future church organists/choir directors.  This year has seen consistent improvement in terms of choral performance, etc. Note: we hosted the Made in the UK Series of the International Jazz Festival  A real highlight this year was Gwyneth Herbert’s composition of a song dedicated to us and our city.

Respectfully, submitted

Carlos Mercado

 Adult and Youth Ed: No changes to report, from Val.

 Amsden Fund 2019 Allocation: Lucie moved to approve Amsden Allocation to be the same as last year, with awards made to seminarian Keisha Stokes and CC Choral Scholar and Music Scholar. Meg seconded. Approved unanimously.

 Discussion of Rector’s Leave of Absence: The question revolves around what manner and sort of Vestry input is called for in the selection of a Priest in Residence to serve until Easter 2019. Bishop Singh, Canon to the Ordinary Johnnie Ross, and Deb, Kyle, and Meg (representing Finance) met, and agreed on these four areas as key job assignments: Presiding at Sunday Services; Pastoral Care; Christian Formation; and,  a Christian Ed. program for Advent and Lent. Out of this meeting came a single recommendation from Bishop Singh and Canon Ross. The sense of the Vestry was to designate another special meeting with Canon Ross, in which various concerns, as well as other potential candidates, could be discussed at length. Deb will arrange that meeting.

 VOC: Deb will address a  VOC presented by Carolyn.  The issues in this VOC have to do with two items: One is the continuing garden/tree situation. The other has to do with Ruth’s longer absence, and how the Vestry plans on arranging for pastoral care during that time.

 Meg announced an upcoming meeting of the Security Committee with an RPD officer. The officer will perform a walk through, discuss past security issues, and develop an overview of recommendations. The Committee will come back with these recommendations to an open meeting. Meg pointed out that we need to seek to identify all who have keys to the church. Several new means of securing entry were discussed.

 Jim closed the meeting with prayer.


ADDENDUM:

REPORT ON SPECIAL VESTRY MEETING HELD SEPTEMBER 27, 2018

 Present: Deb, Kyle,Wardens. Peg, Jeremy, Meg, Jim, Lucie, Val, Joe( on phone). Excused: Ruth, Rector;Carolyn, Vestry. Guest: Rev. Johnnie Ross, Canon to the Ordinary. Dave, Clerk.

 Deb moved that Rev. Peter Peters be our Priest in Residence. Meg seconded. Motion carried, 8 in favor. 1abstention.

 Meg will report financial aspects of this appointment to the Vestry at the October meeting. 

Deb will put news of the blessing of the pets service in an e-mail to be sent to the parish.

Advent dance ©2018 V. Jutsum

Advent dance ©2018 V. Jutsum



So, what about feet? I couldn’t help but notice that they are all over the decor in the nave and the chapel. They are the cover for this edition. They are beautiful because, “How beautiful are the feet of them who preach the gospel of peace.”, the wording courtesy of Handel’s Messiah lyric, and now you will be humming that all day.


You’re welcome.


The Gospel of Peace, itself, is the actual song that fills our hearts with breathless joy. It is about heaven, not heaven eventually, but heaven right now. It is the essence of Advent which is why Advent is, personally, my favorite season. I love that it starts the new church year. It pulls the eyes of our hearts to focus on the biggest of the big stuff: mysterious, smoky, majestic, overwhelmingly beautiful power, the power that is wrapped in light; the person(s) of God.


BANG!


The Holy Spirit sings a complicated song into our very being, revealing our true nature as entirely different from God’s. God floods everything in light, while we hide things in dark corners and hope that nobody (including ourselves) will find them. God endlessly creates that which transcends weighing and measuring, while we hoard petty items mistaking them for treasure. And so we know! We are not God. The idea that we might be confused on that account, is absurd. And yet, the clarity of this obvious fact isn’t, as one might expect, hateful, heavy, and disappointing. It lifts the hearer, imparting a desire to sing with God. This musical magic of melody and harmony changes the person who sings and that changes the universe.


BAM!


You see, that’s the thing about the Good News of the Gospel of Peace; it is actually really, really good. It isn’t about trying harder. It isn’t about being better. It isn’t about making God happy or behaviors that society approves of. Horrors! Not about better people with better morals, but BRAND NEW PEOPLE. It’s about a whole new sort of being. It’s about people who know that they are not God. And, they’re good with it. They exalt in it. They revel in it. Because now they are free to allow God to be God. All the time. Every moment. They are free to enjoy the love affair with Love the Person(s).


YAY!


Everything is different now! It is all imbued with Life. This Life is the energy of Heaven and we live in it. The kingdom of God has come and is coming through us. This isn’t because we have put more effort into having this occur. It is simply the consequence of being new beings. God will. God does. God is. And so, we will. We do. We are.


Stop Worrying!


Jesus assured us that we couldn’t change anything with worry. He assured us that God treasures us. God doesn’t want or need our advice on how things should go or be. God is the power in us and not the other way around. Dearest, Lord, we trust you. We want you. We love you.

Soak in God.

Breathe God’s breath.

Rest in God’s presence.

Pray.

Almighty God, give us grace to cast away the works of

darkness, and put on the armor of light, now in the time of

this mortal life in which your Son Jesus Christ came to visit

us in great humility; that in the last day, when he shall come

again in his glorious majesty to judge both the living and the

dead, we may rise to the life immortal; through him who lives

and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and

for ever. Amen.


So, what about our feet, our beautiful, beautiful feet? Ahhhh. So good.

Val Jutsum- editor

© 2018 V.Jutsum

© 2018 V.Jutsum

The Very Rev. Ruth Ferguson is on long-term disability leave due to Lyme decease. Her hopes for a speedy return are echoed by the parish. We are blessed to have The Rev. Peter Peters serve as Priest in Residence beginning on Sunday, November 4, 2018, while she is recovering.

Welcome to Rev. Peter Peters

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Pentecost/ Michaelmas 2018

Keep me as the apple of your eye; hide me in the shadow of your wings- Psalm 17:8 BCP Compline   above- Angel lectern, Christ Church Rochester,NY

Keep me as the apple of your eye; hide me in the shadow of your wings- Psalm 17:8 BCP Compline

above- Angel lectern, Christ Church Rochester,NY

CHRIST CHURCH                   PENTECOST/ Michaelmas  2018

Rochester, NY                      The SONG                            vol. 3 issue  6


The Very Rev. Ruth Ferguson is on long-term disability leave due to Lyme decease. Her hopes for a speedy return are echoed by the parish. We are blessed to have The Rev. Peter Peters serve as Priest in Residence beginning on Sunday, November 4, 2018, while she is recovering.

Welcome to Rev. Peter Peters

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Lessons and Carols

December 7, 2018 7pm

EVENTS and ANNOUNCEMENTS

in This Issue



Lessons and Carols

Candlelight Concert and Compline

Third Sunday Lecture Series and Compline

The Open House at Christ Church 11/10/18

East Ave Grocery Run (for Meal and More)

Parish Necrology 2018

All the Beloved Dead of the Parish

Vestry Minutes


The Open House at Christ Church 11/10/18

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Dear friends,

Thank you for attending Tune In // In Tune: An East End Open House at Christ Church on November 10th. It was such a pleasure to welcome guests, neighbors, and friends to the space, and the music, food, and conversations were all we could ask for and more.

During this season of thanksgiving, we couldn't be more grateful for this building and the many outstanding programs and events that happen within its walls. Thank you to all who have supported our efforts!

On behalf of all of us at Christ Church, I want to wish you a very happy Thanksgiving and a warm holiday season. I'll see you again soon!

With gratitude,

Lucie

East Ave Grocery Run (for Meal and More)

Parish Necrology 2018

All the Beloved Dead of the Parish

Vestry Minutes October 16, 2018

 Property Discussion: Lawn Street Wall Update

John Fields reported on several meetings with Bero Architecture and potential contractors.

The engineer would like to tear down the ceilings and examine what is there. That will mean access will be lost to the basement, first, and second floor hallways. Work could begin in February. Due to the nature of the work, windows in the hallway will look more boxed in. Also, hallways on all levels will necessarily be narrower. The Vestry should be prepared for a request for allocation of funds before the next meeting. The Vestry thanked John for all of his efforts.

 Capital Campaign: Tom Foster, Nancy Norwood, and Dan Meyers have joined the committee.

 Stewardship Report from Pru Kirkpatrick via Carolyn Mauro

• Announcement in church bulletin for a Stewardship Church Supper Saturday, November 17, 6:30pm. Sign up poster will be in the hallway. List two favorite hymns on sign upsheet.  Sing a-long after dinner.

 Property Discussion: Kyle reported. There is a bat problem in the sanctuary and sacristy. There is a pigeon problem in the bell tower. There is a very real health concern, in both instances, and aconcern about damage to the organs. Bell repair cannot be attended to, due to pigeon mess. There is also an aesthetics issue. Everyone agreed as to the urgency of remedying the current situation, as well as endeavoring toward a solution which will stand the test of time.

    Kyle and John Fields have received estimates from exterminators, and are seeking more. The Vestry should be prepared to entertain a request for funding before the November meeting.

 Finance Report: Report from the Treasurer

Income was about $270,700 and expenses were about $265,700 which resulted in a surplus of about $5000.  The projected budget deficit was about $26,000.  Incomeincreased by about $26,300 and expenses increased by about $27,700.

 Report on RPD Security Visit: Meg presented a 9 page document entitled Assessment Completed by Crime Prevention Officer Vincent Agnone of the Rochester Police Department. 

 A group working on security, including Moses Roland, met with Officer Agnone. After inspection, Officer Agnone concluded the we are actually doing quite well in terms of security, but there are recommendations for improvements, especially in the areas of lighting; key access; blocking off access to areas where appropriate; and, practice in emergency preparedness.

 Kyle will price out different key options ( i.e. key, keypad, swipe ).

 Meg will see if the RPD officer is available to do a Sunday church security meeting for all interested.If so, Meg will get permission from Eastman to use the sanctuary for such a meeting.

 Warden’s Report: Deb 

The tree sculpture will be inspected by a qualified outside individual. If it passes inspection and is up and running by October 28, it will stay up until January 4. 

 Jim reported that he and Norm Geil, Treasurer, will be meeting with the tenant this week.

 Respectfully submitted by Dave Jutsum, Clerk of the Vestry

Vestry Minutes September 18, 2018

 

Present: Deborah VanderBilt and Kyle Liddell, Wardens;  Margaret Britt,  Meg Mackey,  James Kurmis, Carolyn Mauro,  Lucie Parfitt,  Valerie Jutsum, Vestry.  Excused:  Rev. Ruth Ferguson, Rector. Jeremy Cooney, Joseph Schaller, Vestry.  Guests:  Vicki McCutchon,  Weddings;  Bleu Cease, Executive Director/Curator of Rochester Contemporary Art Center;  Norman Geil, Treasurer. Dave Jutsum, Clerk.

 

Action Points:

 1. Kyle will modify website tab to indicate that we are not scheduling weddings now, because of renovations.

2. Norm and Jim are setting up a meeting with the tenant at the beginning of October.

3. At the October Vestry meeting we will talk about the early payment of our diocesan loan.

4. Lucie will set up a time for a meeting to discuss a “boilerplate” or “elevator speech” in anticipation ofquestions asked at the Gala. 

5. Meg will meet with Finance in the matter of how to direct Pat in the manner of paying Ruth as she changes to new Leave status. She will also discuss this with Ruth.

6. Deb will contact Canon to the Ordinary Johnnie Ross, requesting a special meeting with the Vestry. The subject is the choice of a Priest in Residence during Ruth’s absence on Disability Leave from October 2018 through the end of April 2019.

7. Deb will address VOC issue having to do with a) the garden/tree; and, b) Ruth’s absence.

8. A challenge for October meeting is to determine who has keys to various spaces in the church building.

 The meeting was chaired by Deb. Jim opened with prayer. Peg acted as timekeeper.

 Report on Weddings:

Vicki McCutchon is stepping down as Wedding Coordinator. Here is a brief synopsis:

 -We have four more weddings this year. 

-Vicki never scheduled more than a year ahead.

-We are not scheduling weddings now, because of planned renovations to Lawn Street wall. Kyle will change this tab on the website. Pat our Secretary needs to be prepared with what to tell couples when they call. 

1-A new Coordinator or Team must be skilled at scheduling weddings, coordinating with Eastman”sneeds for the building.

-We average 10- 15 weddings a year. The website and Jazz Fest were about tied for attracting new weddings, along with people who had attended weddings at Christ Church.

-Vicki’s labor of love in this endeavor over the past eight years was acknowledged as a very special gift to her parish. She, in turn, acknowledged help from Maryanne, Pat, Moses, and Stephen Kennedy.

 Update by Bleu Cease:

The Kalpa Tree Art Exhibit has been plagued by problems from day one. Bleu offered a heartfelt apology for the current state of affairs, and all that has contributed to it. November 5 is the firm date for the end, and repairs to grass and sidewalk will be made at no expense to Christ Church.

 Capital Campaign Report: Lucie announced that Jessica Toner has regretfully stepped down as paid consultant due to personal reasons, as of October 12. The next steps are to transition Jessica’s tasks to the committee; continue planning the November 10 Gala; and, interview and hire a Foundation and Major Gift Consultant. In short, Jessica was instrumental in lending credibility and expertise to the campaign. She got us to this point, which is a good one, and where we are supposed to be. Jessica has left us on good terms. As the campaign moves into its next phase, the rest of her allocated salary can be spent on someone whose abilities also lend themselves to the more focused tasks ahead. The job description has been written. Meanwhile, Lucie is developing a boilerplate in anticipation of questions to be asked at the Open House. She will set up a time for that to be discussed.

 Finance Report: Norm Geil provided a report on church finances. We are still in a slight budget surplus due to diocesan grant. 

 The two major topics discussed were: 1) an analysis of Ruth’s salary and benefit payments. under both short and long term absence. 2) Strategies necessary for the establishment of a lease and necessary repairs for the apartment in the church building.

    As to Ruth’s salary and benefits, there are complicated formulas for short term leave. These then change into something else altogether when short term changes to long term. Naturally, there are ramifications vis a vis the budget. The Parish budget then potentially affects Diocesan financial relationships. Meg will discuss with Ruth, and with the Finance Committee, the finer details of how this will go. Our church Secretary, Pat, must also be brought on board in regards to her participation in the endeavor of paying our Rector for this interim period.

    As for the apartment, Norm and Jim will meet with the tenant in early October. The purpose of this discussion is to communicate to our tenant that he is welcome to stay, under the following conditions: he is paid ip in full; he agrees to signing a lease for $750 per month, starting January 1; and, that necessary repairs will be made

 At this point, Deb took the opportunity to thank the Vestry for their participation in the Newcomer’s Dinner. It was a big success.

 Property Report: Kyle reported that as soon as we have a bid number for the Lawn Street Wall Repair, Property will meet with the Capital Campaign to discuss costs. Our roofer says that the roof is holding steady, currently.

 Vestry Liaison Reports: 

Stewardship: Carolyn volunteered to act as liaison with the Stewardship Committee. Carolyn will bring the plans for the Every Member Canvas to the October Vestry meeting. Other members of Stewardship are Pru Kirkpatrick and Cathy Brennan.

 Worship: Carolyn provided the following report:

Vestry Liaison Report – Carolyn Mauro – Christ Church Rochester

 Worship Committee

 Altar Servers – Eric Mackey – 

 Ushers – Joe McCutchon -  (1) The ushers continue to serve with a faithful and responsible group of volunteers. However it would be nice to be able to add a couple of new ushers to serve once a month or be ready to fill in when needed. The 11:00 am service usually has two ushers and we invite someone from the congregation to help present the bread and wine along with the plate collection at offertory. (2) Also, there in an announcement currently in the service leaflet about how the offertory is more participatory with only two plates and one can expect to have to pass the plate if needed. (3) Additionally, the ushers look forward to a security review along with the vestry and a representative from the Rochester police department later this month. 

 Altar Guild – Bill Soleim

 Lectors – Kevin Finnigan -  The Lectors/Intercessors have little to report.  We've added one new person to our ranks.  We could use some more, so an appeal from the the altar at announcements would be appreciated .  Aside from this, no news.  —Kevin Finnigan 

 Choir – Carlos Mercado - We have been a classroom for organ students, singers, conducting students, and two choral ensembles – the Parish Choir and the Schola Cantorum.  we are also the beneficiary of a fund established under the Will of long – time parishioner, Roy A. Vandelinder, Jr. , established to provide specialized training for future church organists/choir directors.  This year has seen consistent improvement in terms of choral performance, etc. Note: we hosted the Made in the UK Series of the International Jazz Festival  A real highlight this year was Gwyneth Herbert’s composition of a song dedicated to us and our city.

Respectfully, submitted

Carlos Mercado

 Adult and Youth Ed: No changes to report, from Val.

 Amsden Fund 2019 Allocation: Lucie moved to approve Amsden Allocation to be the same as last year, with awards made to seminarian Keisha Stokes and CC Choral Scholar and Music Scholar. Meg seconded. Approved unanimously.

 Discussion of Rector’s Leave of Absence: The question revolves around what manner and sort of Vestry input is called for in the selection of a Priest in Residence to serve until Easter 2019. Bishop Singh, Canon to the Ordinary Johnnie Ross, and Deb, Kyle, and Meg (representing Finance) met, and agreed on these four areas as key job assignments: Presiding at Sunday Services; Pastoral Care; Christian Formation; and,  a Christian Ed. program for Advent and Lent. Out of this meeting came a single recommendation from Bishop Singh and Canon Ross. The sense of the Vestry was to designate another special meeting with Canon Ross, in which various concerns, as well as other potential candidates, could be discussed at length. Deb will arrange that meeting.

 VOC: Deb will address a  VOC presented by Carolyn.  The issues in this VOC have to do with two items: One is the continuing garden/tree situation. The other has to do with Ruth’s longer absence, and how the Vestry plans on arranging for pastoral care during that time.

 Meg announced an upcoming meeting of the Security Committee with an RPD officer. The officer will perform a walk through, discuss past security issues, and develop an overview of recommendations. The Committee will come back with these recommendations to an open meeting. Meg pointed out that we need to seek to identify all who have keys to the church. Several new means of securing entry were discussed.

 Jim closed the meeting with prayer.

ADDENDUM:

REPORT ON SPECIAL VESTRY MEETING HELD SEPTEMBER 27, 2018

 Present: Deb, Kyle,Wardens. Peg, Jeremy, Meg, Jim, Lucie, Val, Joe( on phone). Excused: Ruth, Rector;Carolyn, Vestry. Guest: Rev. Johnnie Ross, Canon to the Ordinary. Dave, Clerk.

 Deb moved that Rev. Peter Peters be our Priest in Residence. Meg seconded. Motion carried, 8 in favor. 1abstention.

 Meg will report financial aspects of this appointment to the Vestry at the October meeting. 

Deb will put news of the blessing of the pets service in an e-mail to be sent to the parish.


Pentecost and Trinity 2018

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"Herself" © 2003 T. Jutsum; acrylic on canvas - The Spirit hovers over the Earth like a mother over her child

CHRIST CHURCH                   PENTECOST and TRINITY  2018

Rochester, NY          The SONG vol. 3 issue  5

Mirrors at the End of the Day

 

The sun kindles bare branches,

drapes them in silver glow

candles the remaining leaves

burnishes those not ready to let go.

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The shadows mirror the top branches reaching for heaven, 

spill onto to sidewalk, as if waiting to wrap

whoever sees them, inviting each of us to join in

the spell of this moment

                                                with grateful heart.

 

Kitty Jospe

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Lilies of the Field- © M.V. Hill

Lilies of the Field- © M.V. Hill

A Study in Electricity- © Elizabeth Dugdale

A Study in Electricity- © Elizabeth Dugdale

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Contributing Life

Peter was quoted as having said to Jesus, "Lord, you alone have the words of eternal life.", John 6:68. But, the Spirit of God has come to us and we have been given this power to share with God. We have the words of eternal life!

 

This issue, Pentecost/Trinity, we have contributions from two voices from our parish family; Kristy Liddell and Fr. Stephen Metcalfe. I think both are outstanding and life giving. I hope you are inspired and enlivened as well.

 

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Happy Pentecost!

Val Jutsum- editor

Manifestations of the Holy Spirit: wind and tongues of fire; sudden, supernatural knowledge; miraculous healings and raising from the dead; people transported instantly to distant places; people shining so brightly others can’t bear to look at them; prisoners freed by angels and earthquakes. And: Finding the right words for another person’s encouragement or guidance. Help deciding where to go next. Seeing past prejudice - even caution and ideas about cleanliness - to another person, complex, dignified, divine. Sobriety. Song. A whole community willing to share material goods. A community that hears the voices of those who complain that they’ve been neglected, and successful administration of meals to all in need. Discernment between what is essential and nonessential in a community.

 

I need help (and I assume I’m not alone in this) with the connection between wonder at the marvelous and the steady, inconspicuous responsibilities it leaves in its wake, responsibilities that can feel like they dampen wonder and wall off mystery.

 

I’m tempted to think of the connection as an economic exchange: I pay my pledge, rehearse on Wednesday nights, and usher at compline; I get a beautiful sacred space, good music, and a sublime worship experience.

 

This economic metaphor means I have a dual role - I can be a consumer, a spectator; I can tiptoe into compline, full of strangers toward whom I easily feel a general goodwill (as long as they’re quiet); I can receive communion and savor the moment, kneeling in a pew and praying reverently (instead of crowding into the back room with the knocking radiator and, thinking, well, really, can we still not figure out how to line up so that we can walk out in rows with some decorum and not like a gaggle of panicked geese?). Or, if I’m not caught up in reverence, I can still be a liturgical connoiseur: Ah, yes, one of my favorite collects; ah, Tallis; what a fine experience!

 

To sustain this economy, I can be a “producer”: I can do my part to provide an experience for those who are “consumers.” And this concept brings some baggage: pride in a good performance, anger at those who might bring my performance down, fear that it’s not good enough, and, if I’m honest, resentment toward the “consumers” who drop in occasionally and just assume the walls won’t fall down, the windows won’t fall in, there will always be a priest, a music director, a choir, organists, and a congregation as the backdrop for their annual transcendent experience (not very nice, but that’s a producer for you).

 

Besides the economic metaphor, there’s another set of impulses, roughly overlaid with the consumer/producer roles. One is to just sort of stand around, spiritually, waiting for those transcendent experiences, as if they are all that keep me going. The opposite is to be a nuts-and-bolts behind-the-scenes insider, the Man behind the Curtain, getting to know people and their quirks and little conflicts with others (and maybe reveal mine to a select group), to roll my eyes when so-and-so’s doing such-and-such again, to know all about the falling plaster and falling walls and committees, to be In but not “taken in”, to Know How Everything Works (and How Everything Should Work). It has its consolations--a sense of competence in a predictable sphere, most of all.

 

Over and over, we revisit this set of poles: Mary/Martha, the prodigal son/the elder brother, aesthetic and ethical.

 

Oh, how we want and need them to connect and to start merging, so that we don’t become shallow and dabbling or jaded and resentful, so that we see our daily places, people, and work  are full of God.

 

Oh, how I need them to be pure: to have moments when all the business and all my self-consciousness drops away and a Bach fugue knocks me into God like a tsunami; to have times when I realize I can find sheer will to get out of bed and do the dishes and meet perplexing people and be nice and just Do Work when everything feels utterly empty.

 

I hope the Holy Spirit shows up somewhere in all of this ebb and flow, to help us live with ourselves and with each other. While we celebrate tongues of fire and a new calling, while sermons are about surprises and disruptions, some of us are precariously balanced, either in the pews or pulpits, in sacristies or soup kitchens, homebound or hospitalized, held up by habits when the easiest disruption is despair. And as we go through the long green life of ordinary time, some of us will have moments or days when the ordinary is overwhelmed with some blazing, glorious God.

 

How, in God’s name, do we share all that with each other? In an earlier draft I wrote that I thought that mainline protestants might struggle more than others to talk about that connection between God and ordinary life, but I’ve scratched it out. Surely everyone struggles to open up when languages of transcendence encounter languages of sophistication (or anti-intellectualism), of doubt, of doctrine (I don’t use this term disparagingly), of morality, of loyalty, of convention, of conviction, of uncertainty over something crucial, of lament, of nostalgia, of hope, of sheer boredom and weariness. What if I try to share something true and say it falsely? What if I try to share something sacred, and someone chuckles politely, or argues, or doesn’t even hear? What if I try to share the one thing that’s holding me up and someone knocks it down? What if I feel that I need to make a genuine moral effort at something and someone thinks I’m extreme? Or neurotic? Or self-righteous? Or joking? What if I sound delusional, or drunk (at 9 in the morning!)?


What if God is lost in translation? Not only between us, but within us, from transcendent moment to the ways we try to carry that moment forward into everyday life? How can we keep ourselves and our community together, let alone grow together, share everything, welcome strangers?

 

Even so. It seems we’re encouraged to believe that the Holy Spirit is about translation: visions to meals, marvelous healings to moral dilemmas, rehearsals to revelations, compline to conversations about the Cadillac hotel. What on earth does it look like, I wonder, to trust that translator a little more? Or even fully?

Kristy Liddell

 

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Dear Brothers and Sisters at Christ Church and wherever this note finds its way:

I’ve returned from the celebration of Pentecost at Christ Church this Sunday, May 20. The Sunday celebration of the Lord’s Day is always a moment in time unlike any other: you either make it or miss it. Pentecost has the added distinction of being one of 7 major feasts of the Church, including Christmas and Easter. Alas, very few of us arrived to celebrate which led to my consideration of the whole “church going” matter.

First of all, this is not an attempt to persuade or shame anyone. Frankly, I don’t really want to go to church more times than is proper for me to admit. There are lots of reasons for that, most of them circumstantial and others more theologically complicated. Attending the service is occasionally burdensome and sometimes I just don’t see the point. But, I do know the point even though it sometimes doesn’t persuade me. That being said, Major Feasts (with the exception of Ascension Day which is always Thursday) are, for me, “command performances.”

Here are some reasons not to go to church: Attendance will make me a good person. I will get something “out of” the liturgy that is good for me. I know my mother wants me to go. Not going is a sin. I want to get married in this church. I want people to see me as a responsible, good person. I want to feel more “spiritual”. There are a thousand other reasons people might feel pressure to go to church and I certainly know how most of them feel as I have wandered these paths now and again.

The most powerful reasons I stay active and show up most Sundays are quite simple. This is where Christians gather on Sunday mornings; I am a Christian and that identity still fits me, so I go where the Christians go. Secondly, it is an objective act of devotion which maintains my irrevocable connection with God and with God’s family. I am sure I will hear God’s Word spoken and perhaps the Holy Spirit will lead me to hear it in a way that I haven’t before, but could be quite necessary. I might hear the same old hymns, pray the same old prayers, hear the same old Gospel, trudge up to receive the same old sacrament. Even so, that’s what Christians do. I’m sure that every Christmas you go to your family’s house, eat the same food, hear the same stories from Uncle Buck, get in the same arguments with your brother in law, and come away both pleased and dismayed at the recognition that you are part of this odd family. That doesn’t matter.

Finally, I remind myself that in the public square the identity of “Christian” has been firmly (and I hope not unequivocally) claimed by some of the most deluded “disciples” imaginable. When I hear Jesus saying, “you did not choose me, but I chose you...” sometimes I just shake my head. Of course, from Jesus’ point of view, we are all wrong headed and also fully deserving of his Love. Insofar as various factions who claim membership in the Church make every effort to lead us far astray, I believe it is incumbent upon me to physically be in a gathering which understands the Gospel quite differently. I don’t hear Jesus instructing his disciples on the arts of blaming, shaming, or scorning. Jesus says in Matthew, “Not everyone who says to me, “Lord, Lord”, will enter the kingdom of heaven, but only one who does the will of my Father in heaven.” This might be where we all differ: what could be the will of God?

So, there it is, the testimony of a Christian, far outrun by the various champions of Christ who seem to be blissfully fueling an aimless, self satisfied culture. I have no power to do anything about all that except make sure I do what most honorably mirrors myself. The outcome of everything is God’s business.

God’s Grace and Blessing, Steven Metcalfe+

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Ruth's column

Dear All,

 

It is Pentecost and I am with you in SPIRIT!!

 

I've seen my Lyme specialist and, while the blood work is inconclusive, he is treating for possible co-infections to be on the safe side. The antibiotic treatment will end in June, and I hope to feel better shortly after, if not before. I'm learning so much about the human immune system and the complexities of what goes into our chemical make-up. I am, in fact, seeing multiple theological metaphors in my studies of the microbes within us - the good, the bad, and the neutral. (Expect the term "microbiome" to fly from the pulpit on my return.)

 

Symptoms come and go, depending on the dormant and active cycles of the bacteria, and the effects of the antibiotics. I've noticed a real difference in mental sharpness and physical energy on my special paleo/ketogenic diet, and after I'm completely better, I might just stick to it and to taking my herbal supplements (I like to show them off). What is most confounding about Lyme disease - the current medical contraversies regarding treatment and recovery - is also, for me, the most truth telling: that my body instinctively knows how to heal from this disease if I listen and give it time. And herbs! 

 

I am healing, and it is taking time, but I am healing and it is real. Thank you for your prayers, and your prayers for one another and for all who are in need of healing.  Prayer for healing is more than prayer. It is also a proclamation of hope, of the good that is to come, and of the God for whom we wait. "Then shall your light break forth like the dawn, and your healing shall spring up quickly; your vindicator shall go before you, the glory of the Lord shall be your rear guard." (Isaiah 58:8)

 

See you soon in church,

Ruth+

 

Did you know that Ruth has a blog? It's beautiful and you can find it here-

https://christchurchrochester.tumblr.com/

This is a setting of the "Our Father" by Scott Perkins our former Assistant Director. Thatcher Lyman is heard here as the solo voice. Thatcher is our present Assistant Director. Scott's work may be purchased via this link: http://www.scott-perkins.com/store/th... Audio/Video by Mobile Audio Productions by Michael Sherman “The Christ Church Schola Cantorum… sings beautifully.” Fanfare, Jan/Feb 2010. Founded in 1997 by Stephen Kennedy, the Schola performs the Office of Compline at Christ Church Rochester NY, Sunday evenings, October through April. First-Sunday Candlelight Concerts and Compline was named “The coolest, most unusual music experience in the city…” in Rochester Magazine’s “Our Top Picks of 2014.” This acclaimed ensemble is also an early music laboratory through engagement of historic rehearsal and performance practices. The Schola specializes in Gregorian chant, Renaissance and Baroque choral music, and choral improvisation. It has collaborated with Manfred Cordes and Weser-Renaissance Bremen, Boston Early Music Festival Chamber Players, and organists Edoardo Bellotti, Hans Davidsson, David Higgs, Olivier Latry, William Porter, Joris Verdin, and Harald Vogel. The Schola has been a favorite of festivals and concert series, notably at the annual international Eastman-Rochester Organ Initiative. APM's Pipe Dreams, Minnesota Public Radio, and WXXI’s With Heart and Voice regularly broadcast tracks, via NPR, from the Schola's CDs. With organists Edoardo Bellotti and Stephen Kennedy, the Schola and dual organs performed a “guided improvisation” accompaniment to Carl Dryer’s 1928 silent classic La Passion de Jeanne d’Arc for Eastman's 2014 EROI Festival and the University of Rochester's interdisciplinary UCIS Cluster on Music and Film. The Schola’s latest CD is of 19th century French choral music with Belgian keyboardist Joris Verdin on Eastman's vintage Mustel harmonium. The Schola is comprised of Rochester-area musicians, Eastman School of Music faculty and students, and RIT faculty. Participation in the Schola is offered for course credit at the Eastman School of Music.

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EVENTS

EVENTS and ANNOUNCEMENTS in This Issue

Special Music Event-Concert

scroll down to read more

 

The College for Congregational Development

What happened at General Convention #79

The Art Tree in the Garden

Pride Parade (not an official Christ Church event)

RedWings Episcopal Night

2018 Jazz Fest

New Addition Meals

Impromptu Tours

Latest Sunday Bulletin and Audio of the 11:00 am Eucharist

(when you click on an image below it will become full size and you can scroll through the pages)

Bishop Prince Singh

Lecture audio and video

    Third Sunday Lecture Series and Compline

Vestry Minutes

GRANTS UPDATE

Concert by “Publick Musick”

TITLE: Bach Cantatas in Christ Church
 

DATE:

Wednesday August 15, 7:30 pm
Christ Episcopal Church
141 East Avenue, Rochester, NY


Returning to the beautiful sanctuary of Christ Church Rochester, Publick Musick will perform the magnificent cantata "Geist und Seele sind verwirret" (BWV 35) by J. S. Bach, featuring countertenor Clifton Massey as the soloist. This two-part cantata for alto, obbligato organ, oboes, and strings incorporates music drawn from an earlier (lost) concerto, including two large-scale instrumental sinfonias. The virtuosic organ solos will be performed by internationally renowned organist Michael Unger. 

Also on the program is the beautiful cantata "Widerstehe doch der Sünde" (BWV 54) for alto and strings, and the joyous concerto TWV 44:43 for three oboes and three violins by G. P. Telemann.

This concert will take place in Christ Church Rochester in order to incorporate the glorious sounds of the Craighead-Saunders organ, an exact copy of a Bach-era instrument, and the only such instrument outside of Europe. The concert will be a rare opportunity to hear Bach's sacred works performed with a full-size baroque organ alongside strings and oboes of the era.


TICKETS: From http://www.publickmusick.org/buy-tickets/ as well as at the door.


General Admission: $20
Patron ticket (includes $30 tax-deductible donation): $50
Student/Low income: $10
Children age 17 and under free

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The College for Congregational Development

Joe Schaller and Deb VanderBilt completed Year 2 of the College for Congregational Development on Saturday, July 28.  The week-long College teaches church leaders tools and models that can be applied to transitions, congregational growth or decline, intercultural communication, conflict, and other life-cycle dynamics that affect the life of a congregation. Joe and Deb report that they came back feeling "energized and inspired. The College facilitators were excellent and skilled teachers. We met Episcopalians from all over the diocese and from the eastern seaboard, heard great stories from them, strategized using case studies and small group exercises, and overall feel supported and better equipped for our roles at Christ Church. And we plan to share more specifically what we learned with the vestry and congregation over the next year." The College celebrates the attendees with a dinner on the last evening of the week--see photo!

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What happened at General Convention #79

Pride Parade 2018

The Pride Parade was not an official Christ Church event. The Rochester Diocese had a place in the parade and Bishop Singh was enthusiastically leading. Many Christ Church parishioners joined in, marching with the Bishop or Jeremy Cooney, a long time member of Christ Church, a vestry member and a candidate for public office (NYS Senate). The people marching with Jeremy did so as friends of his who support his efforts and not directly as representatives of Christ Church. Many of the Christ Church people who wanted to support the LGBTQ community walked with the Diocese. Some folks bounced back and forth. It was colorful fun.

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RedWings Episcopal Night

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2018 Jazz Fest

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Report to the Rector, Wardens, and Vestry 

2018 Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival

Made in the U.K. Series

 

2018 marks our tenth year as host to the Made in the UK Series of the Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival.  In terms of people entering our church building, this is the largest public event of the year, and we welcomed 5,600 music lovers into our nave (and might we say, our bathrooms) each evening for 6:45and 8:45 performances.  This year’s lineup was excellent, and we had as many as 992 in our nave in one evening.  Here is our attendance summary:

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An average of 621 paid attendance each evening.  The low count on Wednesday was due to rain, and the drop on Saturday was the high heat and humidity.

 

Our arrangement with the Jazz Festival is for them to provide the sound and light system, which has been done expertly these past ten years by Andy Greco and his team from Applied Audio, who has come to know our building intimately from an audio perspective.  They also provide a grand piano which they place in the chancel.  In past years, they have used our Steinway Grand, but this year chose to use one from their pool.  They pay us for Moses’ extra time – which is considerable – and for paper & cleaning products for the restrooms and to cover additional water and electricity use.  This $1,500 makes the Festival a break-even event for us.  We have free bottled water available each night, for what we call “Church Free.”  The woven basket on the table is our subtle hint, and we netted about $375 which has gone into the general operating revenue.  One kind soul gave us a donation of $25 “for all we do.”

 

It would be difficult to over-emphasize the importance of our participation in Downtown Rochester’s signature event.  For nine days the East End Cultural District is filled with happy jazz lovers who bring with them a good vibe and make Downtown what we all must hope it could be most of the time.  Christ Church is one of the oldest City institutions, and our various links to the life of our community says something very important and very positive about who we are and what we hope to be.  To see our nave, chapel, and aisles filled with friendly faces, and to see our front yard filled with happy people cannot help but make us all proud and hopeful.  One evening the line to get in stretched from the front porch to the curb of East Avenue.

 

We interact with all the musicians from overseas and the concert-goers, and we can say with absolute certainly that thousands of people have an extraordinarily positive image of Christ Church, Rochester, NY.  Several of the key musicians who have been here more than once tell us that this is definitely their favorite venue.  They are blown away by the sheer beauty of the interior, the majestic organ they see from the chancel as they perform, and they always remark on the hospitality they receive from us.  As people leave each performance, we hear over and over again, how much they love this place, and how appreciative they are to be welcomed into our space.  We cannot tell how many will come to a service, Tuesday Pipes, or Compline, but we hear many “promises!”  We have also received many accolades in the British jazz press, the musicians, and the journalists covering this event.

 

Finally, we want to thank everyone at Christ Church who cooperates with and helps us host this wonderful nine days of great jazz.  We have a stalwart band of volunteers from within and outside the Parish who come back each year to be a part of the goings-on.  And we very much appreciate and value the cooperation of the Rector, Wardens, and Vestry for your support.  This is both a great event and an on-going opportunity for Christ Church.  We look forward to 2019!

 Respectfully submitted,

 The Jazz Festival Committee

Joe and Vicki McCutcheon and Carlos Mercado

New Addition Meals

A "New Addition Meal" being enjoyed at the Vogt house

Impromptu Tours

With a big shout out and round of applause to Joe and Vicki McCutchon for leading and photos

click on the photo for the full effect


Christ Church Vestry Minutes July 17, 2018

 

Capital Campaign: Jessica Tower provided an in depth progress report, including upcoming listening sessions, plans for a Gala event to showcase to friends of Christ Church all of the wonderful things that happen at the community cornerstone which is Christ Church (November 10), and RoCo tree sculpture grand opening, around Sept. 7.

 

Finance Committee Report: Meg reported on the recent Finance Committee Meeting. The committee discussed the pros and cons of enlisting a professional financial planner to manage our funds. 

 

The Finance Committee discussed the current state of the Christ Church apartment.Repairs are needed, and church leaders will meet with the current tenant to discuss the relationship of those repairs with his tenancy. 

 

Property Report: Kyle stated that the Bid Date for Lawn Street Wall Repair is Tuesday, July 23. 

 

Deb said she met with a representative of GC Carpet, who suggested replacing carpets with carpet tiles. Deb also said an engineer has inspected the floor boards of Wilder Hall. He will return for further inspection.

 

Warden’s Report: Deb announced the date of September 7 for the Newcomer Dinner, a pot luck hosted by the Vestry. It will be a story sharing night, i.e., parishioners telling stories about how they first came to Christ Church.

 

Vestry On Call: Paul Sackett was a faithful parishioner who died last spring. There has been no memorial service. Deb will ask Rev. Steven Metcalfe to plan a memorial service as part of Tuesday 12:05 Eucharist.

 

Respectfully submitted by David C. Jutsum, clerk of the Vestry.

 

Vestry Meeting Tuesday, June 19, 2018 Minutes

 

Capital Campaign Report. The members of the committee are hard workers who dedicate themselves to a collaborative effort with a discernible spiritual slant. He announced a Campaign event to be held in the second week of November to recognize donors and showcase partners in the community.

 

Episcopal SeniorLife Presentation. The Vestry welcomed Courtney McGinness and Jessica Kelly from Episcopal SeniorLife Communities. Per the request of the Vestry on behalf of the Care Committee, they presented a comprehensive overview of options for seniors who are living on their own. Ms. McGinness and Ms. Kelly made themselves available to be called upon about services, resources, and to be pointed in the right direction. They mentioned Life Span, Adult Protective Services,Pace Program Elder One Day Program, and Companion Services are but a few of the agencies which can be called upon to help in providing short term and long term solutions. Episcopal SeniorLifeoffers affordable senior housing, assisted living, and nursing home options.

 

Property Committee. Kyle reported that the completed bid documents for Lawn Street Wall Repair are ready. Bids will come in July 12 [since changed to July 24]. Deb reported that both grants have given approval if there is a delay of the beginning of the work. 

 

Kyle reported that a Lighting Engineer is interested in coming up with a plan for improvements in lighting which have been discussed at previous Vestry meetings.

 

Deb reported a bid for resealing the parking lot: $1270.00. A dumpster and a heavy lift from Lawn Street Wall Repair might damage the new sealcoating. No decision for right now was made.

 

Deb announced that new blackout blinds have been installed in the Guild Room.

 

Finance Committee Report: 

The 44 page Audit was presented to the Vestry via E-mail by Meg, in compliance with Diocesan policy. Highlights: Systems are now backed up via the cloud. Thanks to Lucie, Kyle, Meg, and Bill Soleim for their work on the Audit.

 

Warden’s Report.

Deb reported that she approved Vicki McCutchon’s request for 3 quiet fans for the Jazz Fest. 

 

Carolyn presented copies of the new parish birthday card, created by Elizabeth Dugdale and Lucie Parfitt.

 

Deb introduced the issue of Christ Church advertising in the film series pamphlet published by Christians Witnessing for Palestine. Motion passed with 2 abstentions.

 

Deb asked the Vestry to approve, and the clerk to sign, a resolution authorizing Deb to accept funds from the NYS State Grant for repair of the clerestory windows, as required by State policy. The resolution was unanimously approved.

 

RESOLVED: That Deborah VanderBilt, as Warden of Christ Church Society, is hereby authorized and directed to accept funds from the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation in accordance with the provisions of Title 9 of the Environmental Protection Act of 1993, in an amount not to exceed $106,614.00, and to enter into and execute a project agreement with the State for such financial assistance to Christ Church Society for repair of clerestory windows, and if appropriate, a conservationeasement/preservation/public access covenant to the deed to the assisted property.

 

Safety and Security: Meg reported an update on Safety and Security Committee. She is in communication with a RPD officer, who has offered to make a presentation, and do a walkthrough. Meg recommends beginning with the smaller committee along with Moses. After that a meeting for the entire parish could be scheduled. Some training will also be available for those interested.

 

Respectfully submitted by David C. Jutsum, clerk of the Vestry.

 

Vestry Minutes May 22, 2018

 

ACTION ITEMS:

1. Meg will put a Finance update in the Sunday Bulletin.

2. Deb will call both grants to see if we can put off Lawn Street Wall repair until 2019,ifnecessary.

3. Deb will ask Jeremy for the name of the Pittsford Episcopal Church rug guy.

4. Deb, Vicki, Beatrice, and Lucie will work on Bulletin Board changes.

5. Kyle will pass new Sunday Bulletin format changes by Ruth for input and approval.

6. Deb will pursue developing postcards and concerts as fundraisers, in response to Diocesan Congregational Committee suggestions.

7. Deb requests all Vestry to greet the Bishop at Coffee Hour on May 27.

 

Present: Deborah VanderBilt and Kyle Liddell, Wardens; Margaret Britt, Meg Mackey, James Kurmis, Carolyn Mauro, Lucie Parfitt, Valerie Jutsum, and Joseph Schaller, Vestry; Norman Geil, for Treasurer’s report; John Fields, for Property report. Absent: Rev. Ruth Ferguson, Rector; and Jeremy Cooney , Vestry. Recorded by David C. Jutsum, clerk.

 

Deb chaired the meeting. Joe spoke the Opening Prayer. Carolyn acted as Timekeeper. 

 

Norm presented the Treasurer’s Report. The target for the budget at the end of April was 33.3%. Income was at 42% and expenses were at 35%. The budget had predicted a deficit of about $11,540. Instead, there is a surplus of over $7,000.

    We have received the first reimbursement for Ruth’s Medical Leave from the Medical Insurance.

    We are changing Disposal Services from Waste Management to Youngblood. The saving will be $60-$70/month.

    Norm recommended changing our Copier Contract from Toshiba to Cannon. A five year contract featuring unlimited toner, same extra copy charge, 2-3 hour response time, and removal and installation of equipment will save $66/month. 

 

Kyle presented the Warden’s Report. He began by reading Ruth’s Rector’s Report. Synopsis: The healing process is taking place, but it is a difficult road. Ruth hopes to return July 1, easing back in slowly: “So much of our lives and our calling is surely this: not the life we plan, but how we respond to the life that is happening to us.” The specifics of Ruth’s return will be discussed at the July Vestry Meeting.

    Deb asked the Vestry to choose a month for the Newcomer’s Dinner. September was agreed upon. Deb will start with a Doodle Poll of the Vestry. 

 

John Fields presented the Property Report. He passed out a photo of the Ambulatory Wall, and described the story of its construction, eventual fall into disrepair, and plan for reconstruction.Summary: Bero Architectural has almost completed the bid request. After they go out, bids should then be received within about two weeks. The length of the project should be somewhere in the 4-8 week timeframe. It probably can’t be started any later than September 1, because of weather concerns. Deb will call both Grants to see if we can put off construction until 2019, if necessary.

    Other work to be done will be the responsibility of the parish. This includes molding, carpet, drywall, windows, and roof, in terms of removal, repair, rebuild, reinstall, varnish, and such. John will supervise these in-house responsibilities.

    The hallway inside will not be usable during the project. The sidewalk outside the wall will be blocked off by the contractor.  A summary sheet by John is appended to the minutes.

 

Peg presented the Outreach Liaison Report. Here is a list of the salient points:

1.RAIHN : 6 new volunteers have joined. Beatrice Deshommes wants to individualize the RAIHN section of the hallway bulletin board. Beatrice, Vicki, Lucie, and Deb will discuss this.

2.Vicki is getting volunteers for Jazz Fest.

3.CC is hosting the Make Music Festival in the front lawn, hosted by Bernunzio Uptown Music on Thursday June 21, from 12-8 PM.

4. Vicki McCutchon reports 10 upcoming weddings, including 2 for parishioners, for a total of 15 this year.

5.”Growing Family” meals is a ministry that is getting off the ground. (Just what it sounds like-meals provided for families with new babies).

6.A list of school supplies needed for the new year will be coming from CC Pittsford for School #9.

 

Deb led a brief discussion of an offer from the Diocese to save money by using an early payment discount on our Congregational Development Loan. We are in a deficit budget, but we will revisit if we receive any bequests this year.

 

Kyle opened up a discussion of changes in Sunday Bulletin Format. The basic idea is to make the Bulletin more accessible to visitors, and, especially to those who are not familiar with the Episcopal form of liturgical worship. It is quite possible that, to someone walking into an Episcopal church for the first time, the impression is that we are intimidating, catholic, and conservative. Kyle had fashioned two possible facelifts. Many potential changes were discussed. The Vestry was invited to give Kyle suggestions, which he will pass by Ruth in a week, for input and approval.

 

The final discussion was led by Meg, Peg, and Deb. It had to do with a meeting which Meg, Peg, Deb, and Bill Soleim attended: the Diocesan Congregational Development Committee. We are asking the Diocese for a grant. At that meeting, They ask the parish general questions like, what is the parish about and what are our goals? More specifically, what efforts are our congregation making for fundraising which would complement the grant we are requesting?  Here is a list of suggestions which the Diocesan Committee suggested CC looks into:

8. Involve Senior Centers , including Episcopal Church Home, in Tuesday Pipes.

9. A more obvious collection plate at Compline, which is more obvious and well lit.

10. Sponsored concerts.

11. Sell stuff at Jazz Fest, maybe on the lawn.

12. Postcards, Bookmarks, Posters, and Notecards, of CC stained glass windows.

    Deb will pursue postcards and concerts as fundraisers.

 

One Vestry on Call Report was then noted. A parishioner had much trouble getting an address change with the church office. Deb will work with Pat to help her create a dynamic directory.

 

A written Capital Campaign Report was a part of the Agenda. (Appendix 2).

Joe closed with prayer.

 

Submitted by David C. Jutsum, clerk.

 

Appendix 1

 

         

Appendix 2: 

Capital Campaign Committee - Report to the Vestry 

5/22/2018

Campaign Tally: $466,000

Action:

• Implemented new database, inputted all donor data

• Sent pledge reminder letters for 2018 and Campaign Update 

• Naming Opportunities Updated

• Met with Lois Jones and Meal and More 

• Updated all Campaign Policies and Procedures

• Soliciting Donors in Person

Outcomes:

• Received $25,000 in new gifts

• Receiving pledge payments for 2018

• Determined all-inclusive campaign will include kitchen as approved by Vestry (2 possible donors identified to fund this portion est. at $100,000)

Next Steps:

• Meet with all Parish, if meeting is declined then a pledge card and letter will be mailed to them

• Publish Campaign Update

• Begin Cultivating and Soliciting Members of the Community (outside Parish/Vestry)

• Follow-up with all verbal commitments for payments and anyone who has not yet committed

Vestry Minutes,  March 2018

 

Vestry Minutes March 20, 2018

 

  1. Visit from Jessica Tower, Capital Campaign Consultant

Jessica Tower was welcomed to the meeting. She has been a professional fundraiser for fifteen years. Coincidentally, she has previous connections to the Father’s House, and to the Eastman School. She offered an overview of how she hopes to approach her work at Christ Church. She will begin with a Listening Tour, as she becomes acquainted with the community. She will be officially introduced at both services on April 15. She will also be available at coffee hour that day. She will meet with the church staff. She wants them to know that she is available to them. She will supply monthly reports to the Vestry. To sum up, if the Capital Campaign team could be said to be a car moving through traffic, concentrating on looking at the car right ahead, Jessica will be helping by providing the bigger picture of reaching the final destination. The Capital Campaign at Christ Church is an endeavor which she looks forward to embracing with passion and enthusiasm. 

 

2.   Visit from Padraic Collins-Bohrer

Paddy asked the Vestry for a letter of support from the Vestry, to be part of the final step toward ordination to the priesthood. This letter, to be written by Ruth, in ink, and signed by the Vestry, will be sent to Carolyn McConnell at Diocesan HQ, in time for Paddy’s meeting with the Commission on Ministry on Saturday, April 28.

Paddy also gave us an update on his new assignments. Since February 21, he has been at the Church of the Ascension. He has entered into the preaching rotation. His fellow deacon there is Christ Church alumnus Lucy Alonzo. He is also working full time as a chaplain at Strong Hospital. This includes a learning component. He works in the Burn, ICU, Medical Trauma, and Psychiatric Units. He considers his participation in this ministry to be an honor. 

Paddy is beginning to have discussions with the Bishop about work opportunities after ordination. The Vestry thanked Paddy for his faithful response to a calling from God which, though rewarding, involves difficult and trying challenges.

 

3.   Rector’s Time

Ruth and the Executive Committee have decided it best for her to take a three month leave of absence, beginning right after Easter Sunday. She is fighting a very serious disease, and she must have time to rest, without stress, to give her the best chance to get better. The Vestry commended her determination to work as long as she has, in spite of being very ill. Fr. Steven Metcalfe and Fr. Bruce Griffith will be among the supply priests subbing for her in her absence.

 

4. Warden’s Report: 

Deb said 3 people have agreed to act as liaisons to help while Ruth is gone: Deb will be liaison to ROCO; Kyle will be liaison to the Eastman; and, Norm Geil will be liaison to the Father’s House.

 

5.  Capital Campaign Committee:

Joe announced that there is now a Capital Campaign tab on the CC website. It features a thermometer, synopsis of projects, and a donate button. Thanks to Colin Soleim for designing the site.

 

6. Discussion of Safety and Security Meeting Report:

Kyle reported that many big, difficult issues were brought to the forefront at this meeting held on Feb. 28, which was a forum for concerns about safety in the church; especially, in the light of the many tragic mass killings which have happened across the country. There have been incidents at Christ Church which, although “handled”, have revealed the need for professional guidance. We want everyone to be safe, and to take all necessary measures to ensure that. 

A committee of volunteers from the Safety and Security Meeting has formed and will send back recommendations concerning all of these issues. Meg will act as liaison to the Committee, whose members will be Joe and Vicki McCutchon, Spencer and Hope McGuckin, Pru Kirkpatrick, Lois Jones, and Jonathan Falk. 

 

7. Proposal for Garden from ROCO:

The Vestry discussed ROCO’s art project for June-October. It is a concrete tree with LED leaves that change color. One possible location was the center circle, but the Vestry decided the lawn adjacent to ROCO where the other installations have been was a better location for the tree as well. 

 

8. Deb reported that the Sunday evening pre-compline talk by Cynthia Houck on March 18 was well attended. Cynthia encouraged her listeners to join her in supporting a building which in this day and age cannot be rebuilt.

 

 

Respectfully submitted by David C. Jutsum, clerk of the Vestry.

Grants Update

WE GOT GRANTS!

GRANT UPDATE- December 19, 2017

 

The Christ Church grant team is thrilled to announce that the church was granted a New York State historical preservation grant for just over $106,000. The grant team applied for these funds to fix the six clerestory windows, which have damaged sills, frames, and panes, and therefore have let water into the building, which is partially responsible for the piece of the ceiling that fell from the North Aisle a couple of years ago. (The other element responsible was the roof on that aisle, which has already been repaired.) This work will be scheduled for Summer 2020. The grant team was inspired by the successful application by Ron Vukman to get a similar grant from NYS in 2009. It is rare to get a second grant in such a short time, and the grant team is grateful to everyone who helped by supplying us with information, especially Stephen Kennedy and Norm Geil. We are also so grateful for our partners Meal & More and The Father’s House, whose leadership wrote supporting letters to us, and to those in the community who also wrote letters supporting our application. 

 

Deb VanderBilt is also especially grateful to Val Jutsum, who happened to be at home within reach of her phone at the moment before Deb hit the “Submit” button on the grant website. Val and Deb claimed the verse “where 2 or 3 are gathered” and prayed for a successful outcome.  : )   Thanks to the whole grant team:  Deb VanderBilt, Tom Foster, Meg Mackey, Peg Britt, and Hugh Kierig.

 

This brings our grant total for repair work to $148,000.  These grant funds will go a long way toward helping the church pay for repair of the Lawn St. wall and the Nave repair and repainting projects.

Below is the original posting about our Grant process and hopes. I left it in to underline how wonderfully these prayers were answered.-ed.

 

old news

[The grant-writing team (Deb VanderBilt, Tom Foster, Meg Mackey, Peg Britt, and Hugh Kierig) has finished this year’s round of applications. In general, grants are available in the historic preservation category; in other words, we have to specify a building project and the grant will go toward repairs. Here’s an update on where we are with our grants.

 

In January, we applied for a grant from Sacred Sites (a part of the New York Conservancy Trust) for $50,000 for our buckling wall on Lawn Street. We received $25,000, which the grant administrator told us is typically the upper limit of what they award. We must match that grant 50-50 (no problem, since the wall repairs will cost at least $130K).

 

In May, we applied for two grants for the wall as well: to the Rochester Community Foundation Grant for $25,000 and to the Partners for Sacred Places for an unspecified amount (the first step is a “letter of intent”). We should hear from RCF in October, and we already heard we did not make the first cut from Partners for Sacred Places.

 

In July, we applied to New York State for a Historic Preservation Grant. Because our church is in a zip code that is characterized by high poverty, if we get this grant it will be a 75/25 match (we pay 25%). We applied for the grant for clerestory window repair, since the criterion for the grant is urgency. Water infiltration caused part of the ceiling under these leaky windows to fall down, so we believe we have a good case that window repairs are urgent. The application was for about $120,000, and we will hear in January about whether or not we receive it. 

 

We also applied in May for a Congregational Development Grant from the Diocese. This grant can be used for our deficit, so it is very different from the historic preservation grants. If we get it, we are eligible to be on a 5-year cycle of grant renewal, but it will be less each year as we work toward sustainability. To apply for the grant, the team worked on a plan of action to “develop” our congregation: communicating better about what we do to the community and other ways of growing our congregation. We applied for $35,000 and we will hear in September or October from the diocese if we get the grant.  They can say no, give the full amount we asked for, or give a lesser amount based on the total they have to allocate within the diocese.

 

It’s because of this final grant that Ruth, Deb, and Joe were required to attend the College for Congregational Development, to learn tools that will help us grow Christ Church both “inside,” in what we do to develop spiritual lives and fellowship in our church, and outside, in what we do to live out our mission and attract others to work with us on that mission.]

 

It’s also in connection with the Diocesan grant that you took the survey about what attracted you to Christ Church and why you stay. Here are the results of that survey (except the comments, which even though anonymous we are treating as confidential:

 

Member Survey: 63 responses

 

Question 1: What caused you to visit Christ Church for a church service (other than Compline) the first time? (Click all that apply)

I was looking for a faith community 50.00% 26

Heard about it from someone I know 46.15% 24

Found it through the website 13.46% 7

Was in the neighborhood and was curious 13.46% 7

Attended Compline, then came to a service 7.69% 4

Read about it in the newspaper 1.92% 1

Found it via Facebook 1.92% 1 

Attended Jazz Festival then came to a service 0.00% 0

Question 2: What was it about Christ Church that caused you to attend regularly or become a member? (Click all that apply.)

The music 70.4% 43 

The preaching 63.9% 39 

The Christ Church community 59.0% 36 

The way the service is conducted (the liturgy) 57.3% 35

The physical space (Sanctuary) 47.5% 29

The outreach initiatives of Christ Church 34.4% 21

Question 3: If you had to pick a PRIMARY reason why you attend Christ Church regularly or are a member, what would you pick?

The music 26.6% 16 

The Christ Church community 26.6% 16 

The liturgy 20% 12 

The preaching 18.3% 11 

*Question 3 responses by those at CC 8 or fewer years: 

The preaching 31% 9 

The Christ Church community 24.1% 7 

The music 20.6% 6 

The liturgy 17.2% 5

The Care Team

is here to help

 

The Christ Church Care Team is a volunteer ministry to help parishioners on a temporary basis as they recover from surgery, suffer the death of a loved one, are home bound or in the hospital, or need support due to another kind of loss or difficult transition. The Care Team assists parishioners in need with the following: shopping, meals, pet care, house help, phone calls to check in, and home and hospital visits. Please notify the Rector if you or someone you know could use Care Team support. [Care Team Leaders: Shirley Ricker, Norma Kurmis, Lydia Worboys, Peg Britt, Elizabeth Dugdale, Kyle Liddell and Jim Blake]

Easter 2018

Empty Tomb- © 2005 Tim Jutsum

Empty Tomb- © 2005 Tim Jutsum

CHRIST CHURCH                  EASTER  2018

Rochester, NY       The SONG        vol. 3 issue  4

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Why do you seek the living among the dead.png

EVENTS

EVENTS and ANNOUNCEMENTS in This Issue

Capital Campaign Kickoff

Bishop Prince Singh

Lecture audio and video

    Third Sunday Lecture Series and Compline

Latest Sunday Bulletin and Audio of the 11:00 am Eucharist

(when you click on an image below it will become full size and you can scroll through the pages)

Vestry Minutes

GRANTS UPDATE

The Care Team

ANNUAL MEETING- January 28th, 2018

text of agenda

Candlelight Concert Schedule 2017-2018


Capital Campaign Kickoff

Third Sunday Lectures and Compline

Bishop Prince Singh


Vestry Minutes,  March 2018

 

Vestry Minutes March 20, 2018

 

  1. Visit from Jessica Tower, Capital Campaign Consultant

Jessica Tower was welcomed to the meeting. She has been a professional fundraiser for fifteen years. Coincidentally, she has previous connections to the Father’s House, and to the Eastman School. She offered an overview of how she hopes to approach her work at Christ Church. She will begin with a Listening Tour, as she becomes acquainted with the community. She will be officially introduced at both services on April 15. She will also be available at coffee hour that day. She will meet with the church staff. She wants them to know that she is available to them. She will supply monthly reports to the Vestry. To sum up, if the Capital Campaign team could be said to be a car moving through traffic, concentrating on looking at the car right ahead, Jessica will be helping by providing the bigger picture of reaching the final destination. The Capital Campaign at Christ Church is an endeavor which she looks forward to embracing with passion and enthusiasm. 

 

2.   Visit from Padraic Collins-Bohrer

Paddy asked the Vestry for a letter of support from the Vestry, to be part of the final step toward ordination to the priesthood. This letter, to be written by Ruth, in ink, and signed by the Vestry, will be sent to Carolyn McConnell at Diocesan HQ, in time for Paddy’s meeting with the Commission on Ministry on Saturday, April 28.

Paddy also gave us an update on his new assignments. Since February 21, he has been at the Church of the Ascension. He has entered into the preaching rotation. His fellow deacon there is Christ Church alumnus Lucy Alonzo. He is also working full time as a chaplain at Strong Hospital. This includes a learning component. He works in the Burn, ICU, Medical Trauma, and Psychiatric Units. He considers his participation in this ministry to be an honor. 

Paddy is beginning to have discussions with the Bishop about work opportunities after ordination. The Vestry thanked Paddy for his faithful response to a calling from God which, though rewarding, involves difficult and trying challenges.

 

3.   Rector’s Time

Ruth and the Executive Committee have decided it best for her to take a three month leave of absence, beginning right after Easter Sunday. She is fighting a very serious disease, and she must have time to rest, without stress, to give her the best chance to get better. The Vestry commended her determination to work as long as she has, in spite of being very ill. Fr. Steven Metcalfe and Fr. Bruce Griffith will be among the supply priests subbing for her in her absence.

 

4. Warden’s Report: 

Deb said 3 people have agreed to act as liaisons to help while Ruth is gone: Deb will be liaison to ROCO; Kyle will be liaison to the Eastman; and, Norm Geil will be liaison to the Father’s House.

 

5.  Capital Campaign Committee:

Joe announced that there is now a Capital Campaign tab on the CC website. It features a thermometer, synopsis of projects, and a donate button. Thanks to Colin Soleim for designing the site.

 

6. Discussion of Safety and Security Meeting Report:

Kyle reported that many big, difficult issues were brought to the forefront at this meeting held on Feb. 28, which was a forum for concerns about safety in the church; especially, in the light of the many tragic mass killings which have happened across the country. There have been incidents at Christ Church which, although “handled”, have revealed the need for professional guidance. We want everyone to be safe, and to take all necessary measures to ensure that. 

A committee of volunteers from the Safety and Security Meeting has formed and will send back recommendations concerning all of these issues. Meg will act as liaison to the Committee, whose members will be Joe and Vicki McCutchon, Spencer and Hope McGuckin, Pru Kirkpatrick, Lois Jones, and Jonathan Falk. 

 

7. Proposal for Garden from ROCO:

The Vestry discussed ROCO’s art project for June-October. It is a concrete tree with LED leaves that change color. One possible location was the center circle, but the Vestry decided the lawn adjacent to ROCO where the other installations have been was a better location for the tree as well. 

 

8. Deb reported that the Sunday evening pre-compline talk by Cynthia Houck on March 18 was well attended. Cynthia encouraged her listeners to join her in supporting a building which in this day and age cannot be rebuilt.

 

 

Respectfully submitted by David C. Jutsum, clerk of the Vestry.


Grants Update

WE GOT GRANTS!

GRANT UPDATE- December 19, 2017

 

The Christ Church grant team is thrilled to announce that the church was granted a New York State historical preservation grant for just over $106,000. The grant team applied for these funds to fix the six clerestory windows, which have damaged sills, frames, and panes, and therefore have let water into the building, which is partially responsible for the piece of the ceiling that fell from the North Aisle a couple of years ago. (The other element responsible was the roof on that aisle, which has already been repaired.) This work will be scheduled for Summer 2020. The grant team was inspired by the successful application by Ron Vukman to get a similar grant from NYS in 2009. It is rare to get a second grant in such a short time, and the grant team is grateful to everyone who helped by supplying us with information, especially Stephen Kennedy and Norm Geil. We are also so grateful for our partners Meal & More and The Father’s House, whose leadership wrote supporting letters to us, and to those in the community who also wrote letters supporting our application. 

 

Deb VanderBilt is also especially grateful to Val Jutsum, who happened to be at home within reach of her phone at the moment before Deb hit the “Submit” button on the grant website. Val and Deb claimed the verse “where 2 or 3 are gathered” and prayed for a successful outcome.  : )   Thanks to the whole grant team:  Deb VanderBilt, Tom Foster, Meg Mackey, Peg Britt, and Hugh Kierig.

 

This brings our grant total for repair work to $148,000.  These grant funds will go a long way toward helping the church pay for repair of the Lawn St. wall and the Nave repair and repainting projects.

Below is the original posting about our Grant process and hopes. I left it in to underline how wonderfully these prayers were answered.-ed.

 

old news

[The grant-writing team (Deb VanderBilt, Tom Foster, Meg Mackey, Peg Britt, and Hugh Kierig) has finished this year’s round of applications. In general, grants are available in the historic preservation category; in other words, we have to specify a building project and the grant will go toward repairs. Here’s an update on where we are with our grants.

 

In January, we applied for a grant from Sacred Sites (a part of the New York Conservancy Trust) for $50,000 for our buckling wall on Lawn Street. We received $25,000, which the grant administrator told us is typically the upper limit of what they award. We must match that grant 50-50 (no problem, since the wall repairs will cost at least $130K).

 

In May, we applied for two grants for the wall as well: to the Rochester Community Foundation Grant for $25,000 and to the Partners for Sacred Places for an unspecified amount (the first step is a “letter of intent”). We should hear from RCF in October, and we already heard we did not make the first cut from Partners for Sacred Places.

 

In July, we applied to New York State for a Historic Preservation Grant. Because our church is in a zip code that is characterized by high poverty, if we get this grant it will be a 75/25 match (we pay 25%). We applied for the grant for clerestory window repair, since the criterion for the grant is urgency. Water infiltration caused part of the ceiling under these leaky windows to fall down, so we believe we have a good case that window repairs are urgent. The application was for about $120,000, and we will hear in January about whether or not we receive it. 

 

We also applied in May for a Congregational Development Grant from the Diocese. This grant can be used for our deficit, so it is very different from the historic preservation grants. If we get it, we are eligible to be on a 5-year cycle of grant renewal, but it will be less each year as we work toward sustainability. To apply for the grant, the team worked on a plan of action to “develop” our congregation: communicating better about what we do to the community and other ways of growing our congregation. We applied for $35,000 and we will hear in September or October from the diocese if we get the grant.  They can say no, give the full amount we asked for, or give a lesser amount based on the total they have to allocate within the diocese.

 

It’s because of this final grant that Ruth, Deb, and Joe were required to attend the College for Congregational Development, to learn tools that will help us grow Christ Church both “inside,” in what we do to develop spiritual lives and fellowship in our church, and outside, in what we do to live out our mission and attract others to work with us on that mission.]

 

It’s also in connection with the Diocesan grant that you took the survey about what attracted you to Christ Church and why you stay. Here are the results of that survey (except the comments, which even though anonymous we are treating as confidential:

 

Member Survey: 63 responses

 

Question 1: What caused you to visit Christ Church for a church service (other than Compline) the first time? (Click all that apply)

I was looking for a faith community 50.00% 26

Heard about it from someone I know 46.15% 24

Found it through the website 13.46% 7

Was in the neighborhood and was curious 13.46% 7

Attended Compline, then came to a service 7.69% 4

Read about it in the newspaper 1.92% 1

Found it via Facebook 1.92% 1 

Attended Jazz Festival then came to a service 0.00% 0

Question 2: What was it about Christ Church that caused you to attend regularly or become a member? (Click all that apply.)

The music 70.4% 43 

The preaching 63.9% 39 

The Christ Church community 59.0% 36 

The way the service is conducted (the liturgy) 57.3% 35

The physical space (Sanctuary) 47.5% 29

The outreach initiatives of Christ Church 34.4% 21

Question 3: If you had to pick a PRIMARY reason why you attend Christ Church regularly or are a member, what would you pick?

The music 26.6% 16 

The Christ Church community 26.6% 16 

The liturgy 20% 12 

The preaching 18.3% 11 

*Question 3 responses by those at CC 8 or fewer years: 

The preaching 31% 9 

The Christ Church community 24.1% 7 

The music 20.6% 6 

The liturgy 17.2% 5

Lent 2018

IMG_2474.jpg

CHRIST CHURCH       LENT  2018

Rochester, NY                      The SONG                            vol. 3 issue  3

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The Care Team

is here to help

 

The Christ Church Care Team is a volunteer ministry to help parishioners on a temporary basis as they recover from surgery, suffer the death of a loved one, are home bound or in the hospital, or need support due to another kind of loss or difficult transition. The Care Team assists parishioners in need with the following: shopping, meals, pet care, house help, phone calls to check in, and home and hospital visits. Please notify the Rector if you or someone you know could use Care Team support. [Care Team Leaders: Shirley Ricker, Norma Kurmis, Lydia Worboys, Peg Britt, Elizabeth Dugdale, Kyle Liddell and Jim Blake]


Christ Church     Annual Parish Meeting    January 28, 2018

 

Prayer and Rector’s Opening Remarks The Rev’d Ruth Ferguson    

 

Updates/Greetings from Community Partners Bleu Cease, ROCO

Lois Jones, A Meal & More

Chef Alan Callerame & William Drayton

Emily Brennan

Nominations for Warden and Vestry Kyle Liddell

  • Warden for 2-year term
  • Three vestry persons for 3-year terms
  • 1 Vestry person for 1-year fill-in term
  • Open spot for 2-year fill-in term

Open Ballot

Voting members are 18 years or older, have been baptized for at least 12 months, are regular attendants at worship, and contribute to the support of the parish.

Report on Parish ministries

Music Program Lydia Kirkpatrick

Spiritual Formation Kyle Liddell

Outreach Lucie Parfitt

Finance Committee Meg Mackey and Norm Geil

Capital Campaign Lucie Parfitt

Warden’s Remarks Deb VanderBilt

Close Ballot The Rev’d Ruth Ferguson

Closing Prayer The Rev’d Ruth Ferguson

 

REPORT on the Music Program

Stephen Kennedy, Music Director

Christ Church Music Program

Special thanks and appreciation is due to each of you for your participation in music at Christ Church. Whether singing a chant or hymn, listening to a prelude or postlude, or honing a motet in a rehearsal, we are all celebrating something important together as a family through music and we do it with love. We are grateful for the support and work of our Rector Ruth Ferguson, Wardens Deborah Vanderbilt and Kyle Liddell, the Vestry, Pat Knapp, and Moses Roland. We also want to thank our Associate organists David Higgs and William Porter for contributing so generously of their time and talent. They also help with mentoring and teaching our parish musicians and VanDelinder Fellows. Our VanDelinder Fellows Joshua Ehlebracht, Henry Webb, and Alden Wright also deserve tremendous thanks for all their great work in our parish.  Our Eastman-Christ Church Choral Scholar, Adam Sadberry; Choral Scholar, Evan Ritter; and Music Scholar, Thatcher Lyman (Assistant Director of the Schola Cantorum) also contribute greatly to music at Christ Church. It is so exciting to see such growth in liturgical music skills from these dedicated young musicians. We are also extremely grateful to Christopher Huebner, Schola librarian and coordinator, as well as our dedicated teem of Compline Ushers. Continued thanks and appreciation goes to the members of our parish ensembles as listed below:

 

Goals from 2017 – ongoing in 2018

  1. Attract more people to Christ Church through our music program Goal on target
  2. Raise the level of musicianship in CC ensembles Goal on target
  3. Raise community awareness of our rich and diverse music program Goal on target
  4. Foster the education and training of musicians in liturgical music skills Goal on target
  5. Engage people from the larger community (non parishioners) to help fund 

our parish music program Goal on target

  1. Install professional recording equipment in the church to record CC Choir, 

Youth Ensemble, Consort, CC liturgies, and concerts     Working on installation date

7.   Fundraising to support our parish music program Goal on target

8.   Strengthen existing community collaborations and partnerships in music Goal on target

 

Opportunities for individuals to assist and contribute in our parish music program  

  1. Compline ushers and Candle-lighters   Team is in place, but more are welcome
  2. Greeters at Tuesday Pipes to represent the parish   Alan Jones is our regular; others are welcome 
  3. Volunteers to help send publicity to media via e-mail   Help in this would be great
  4. People to help set up for Compline following the 11:00   CC Choir members could use assistance

Eucharist  

  1. People to assist in searching for grants and grant writing     Volunteers needed

REPORTS on Christ Church Programs and Volunteer Opportunities

Along with pledging, the donation of one’s time to parish organizations and working groups has a tremendous impact on the vitality of the church. Below you’ll see a list of all the groups and tasks working at Christ Church. Groups with a crucial need have those needs in bold print, but all the groups welcome new volunteers. Please read the list and see what might match your interests and skills. 

A MEAL AND MORE – Lois Jones

 

In order to sustain, A Meal and More, now beginning its 39th year, it takes the cooperation and effort of: Christ Church Rochester; A Meal and More, Inc. Board Members; Hundreds of Volunteers, from both Episcopal and non-Episcopal churches; an experienced and competent Chef; a pleasant and watchful Greeter and a germ conscious and helpful Dishwasher.

It is truly startling to find out that 1 out of every 6 people in the United States is considered food challenged. 8130 meals were served during 2017 by A Meal and More. The Elderly are a very consistent presence. Between 140 and 270 meals were served to them every month this year, as compared to between 150 and 200 meals per month last year. The number of meals to Children nearly doubled with 40 meals per month being served to Children compared to approximately 25 meals per month last year. Adults – make up the largest group we feed with approximately 500 meals served to this group each month which is down by about 100 meals per month from last year but those meals are now being served to the Elderly and Children. 

The 3 men who faithfully feed our Urban poor are: Allen Callerame, Chef; William Drayton, Greeter and Nick Donofrio, Dishwasher.

We want to THANK all the members of Christ Church for your faithful and continued support of A Meal and More, Inc.’s Ministry. --Lois Jones, Vice President and Kristy Liddell, Volunteer Coordinator 

ALTAR GUILD – Bill Soleim

 

The Altar Guild is a group of men and women who works mostly behind the scenes to prepare for services on Sunday. Our ministry involves caring for the vestments, vessels, and altar linens of Christ Church. We usually work in pairs to set up for Sunday’s services at 9:30 on Saturday morning (for about 1 hour). After the 11:00 service, we take about 20 minutes to wash communion vessels and put away vestments. We each serve one a week per month, but many of us also work together on Christmas and Easter to decorate the sanctuary. If you think you would enjoy serving God and our congregation in this quiet ministry, please contact Bill Soleim. 

Crucial need: A partner for an altar guild member currently serving alone on SECOND and FOURTH Sundays of the month.

ANGEL TREES – Eleanor Peet

 

This outreach program is the collection of Christmas gifts for the women clients, and their families, of the Willow Domestic Violence Center (formerly known as Alternatives for Battered Women). The Center provides us with a wish list. Paper Angels with suggestions written on them decorate two trees that are placed in the sanctuary and the Guild Room each December. Parishioners take an angel or two and bring their gifts unwrapped back to church to be brought to the Center mid-December. Willow Center says: “over 70% of domestic violence crimes are witnessed by children. A simple gesture of providing new toys during their stay can give a child in crisis a sense of normalcy and hope.”

 

BIRTHDAY CARDS – Carolyn Mauro

A delightful task that we on the birthday card team have is to send greetings to every member of our parish family whose birthday we have on record at the parish office. This is a small but, we’ve heard, enjoyed yearly acknowledgment of your importance to our parish family—you’re all a vital part of us. We’re all grateful for your presence and giving of your talents to Christ Church’s mission, so the cards are a small but sincere reminder of that to you. Crucial Need: Several members have not shared their “special day” with us, and if you have chosen not to participate, we understand. However, if you have been with Christ Church for a while and have not been acknowledged, or if you are new to us, and would like to receive a yearly card, please notify the parish office at your earliest convenience. Thank you.

A GIFT AND A PROMISE CAPITAL CAMPAIGN COMMITTEE REPORT – Joe Schaller

The members of the committee are: The Rev. Ruth Ferguson; Gail Lynch; Lucy Parfitt; Joseph Schaller, chairperson; Bill Soleim; John Urban; and Deb Vanderbilt. The committee is grateful for the opportunity to serve Christ Church.

The Christ Church building needs repair. If we are to continue to worship and fulfill our great commission, as Christians, in this building, the repairs must be done as soon as possible. Because our operating funds are insufficient to pay for the capital improvements, the Christ Church Vestry decided to initiate a capital campaign. A campaign committee was formed, and the campaign was named A Gift and a Promise. Your Gift is for our near-term needs and it is also a Promise – because it secures our future. The campaign goal is $1 million. Demonstrating their commitment to the campaign each member of the vestry has pledged a gift. 

In the spring of 2017 a capital campaign consultant was briefly retained. Dissatisfied with the consultant, the relationship was terminated, and the capital campaign committee assumed the responsibilities for the day-to-day operational management of the campaign. The committee has been meeting on a weekly basis since August 2017. Campaign polices, collateral materials and an administrative infrastructure were created. Fundraising plans were determined and initiated for parishioners, friends of Christ Church and external organizations. 

To date the campaign has raised through gifts, pledges and grants… Apologies for the tease but to find out the amount raised and other important details of the campaign, and your vital role we cordially invite you to A Gift and a Promise kick-off celebration on Sunday, February 11 following the 11 AM service. 

CARE TEAM – Norma Kurmis and Elizabeth Dugdale

The Meals Care Team has 8 active members. We have provided several meals to 4 families since the summer. The team will bring meals on a temporary basis to parishioners who have suffered bereavement, have a new baby or are home from the hospital, for example. If anyone knows of a family who could use a little extra help with a meal or two, please contact Ruth with your request. Sometimes the requests can come in quickly, so anyone who is willing to donate their time and meal-prep skills to the team would be welcomed! If you are interested in joining us, please let me know at lotusmom2000@hotmail.com.

Home Visits currently has 10 members who arrange amongst themselves to go a visit a fellow member of our church when notified who is in need of a little bit of society but cannot get to church! We have (luckily) only been called upon to arrange visits for a total of 3 fellow church members over the past year. I believe we have done a good job in dividing up the visits and find these interactions & chances to socialize highly rewarding, but as the head of this group, I confess: I have done a poor job in double checking in with my teammates and apologize...Sorry ya'll! We are always welcoming more people to add their name to the list to go visit a church family members when they are in need of some company so please email Elizabeth Dugdale at emother@gmail.com if you would like to join! (And/or if you have any suggestions).  If you need a meal or a visit from the Care Team, call or email the Rector and she will let the Care Team know.  

COMMUNICATION COMMITTEE – Kyle Liddell

The communications committee is composed of the maintainers of the CC website, The Song, the Facebook page, our paper brochures and advertisements, and other publicity efforts.  Follow our church activities in The Song and on Facebook and share them with others.

FORUM – Mary Vukman

The Forum is a study and discussion group that meets on Sunday mornings.   Most recently, we have been reading the Letter of James slowly and inquisitively.  We ask a lot of questions and toss around a lot of maybe's, hoping to better understand our our Christian heritage and calling.  Watch the bulletin for a new topic coming soon.   Then join us any Sunday 9:45 -10:45 am in the Guild Room. 

FOYERS – Val Jutsum

Foyers is our name for small informal groups of Christ Church parishioners who meet for a meal. They are a wonderful way, whether you are relatively new to the church or a long-time member, to meet and get to know other Christ Church members.

Foyers groups are composed of 6-8 people who meet once a month in each others’ homes for a simple dinner. Each person hosts one dinner during the “season,” and it is a simple dinner (not potluck) lasting from about 6 to 9 p.m.  There is no agenda, just fun and fellowship! Because of Rochester weather, the “Foyers season” at Christ Church is April to October.  

Do you have small children? In the past, we have offered the choice to specify if you would like to be in a group with others with small children. Please note your choice about that when signing up below.

Are you thinking “I don’t have space for 8-10 people to sit around a dining table”? Don't let that stop you! Dinners can be informal--we can balance plates on our laps! We can picnic! All who want to be part of Foyers are welcome.

This past Foyer Season didn’t occur. The number of interested participants wasn’t enough to make a group(s). 

Crucial need: Interested people to eat a meal and have fun.

CHANCEL TEAM: Acolyte, Crucifer, Subdeacon, Thurifer, Verger – Jim Bement

 

At all celebrations of the Liturgy, it is fitting that the principal celebrant, whether bishop or priest, be assisted by other priests, and by deacons and lay persons.” (BCP, 322 & 354).  When serving at the altar, members of the chancel team are fulfilling those directions of the Book of Common Prayer. We are aware that the purpose of assisting at the altar is “that God may be glorified.” Since last year’s report, we have added 5 members to the Team including 1 youth.  To reinitiate the position of Verger in our services we will need two or three additional members.  Training as to what to do as well as why we do it will be provided at your convenience.  Please contact me or the Rector if you wish to explore this service to our parish and to God. --Jim Bement, 585.734.5756, jhbement@rochester.rr.com

JAZZ FESTIVAL – Carlos Mercado

 

Each June, our parish welcomes over 6,000 music lovers to our building to enjoy what has become one of the four top jazz festivals in the world and the largest gathering of British Isles musicians outside of England.  This was the tenth year that we have hosted the “Made In the UK” Series, and it is possible only because of a group of dedicated parish and community volunteers.  Having been designed as a Community Outreach event, it covers our out-of-pocket costs and affords an opportunity to showcase our historic building.  As a result of the festival and press coverage, the name “Christ Church Rochester, NY” is well known in UK jazz circles, and we enjoy an excellent reputation for our hospitality and the quality of our facilities.  We look forward to our 11th year in just a few months. Team: Carlos Mercado. Joe and Vicki McCutcheon

COFFEE HOUR, SCHOOL 9, MEALS for NEW PARENTS, WEDDINGS & SPECIAL EVENTS [phew!]         – Vicki McCutchon

Coffee hour is a well- oiled machine.  We have a great crew that continue to provide tasty and quenching treats and bring us all together to catch up with one another.

This is a fun year for weddings and Meals for New Parents, because we have sisters having babies within weeks of one another and we have two parishioner weddings this summer.  In addition to our two parishioner weddings there are 4 other weddings on the books.  The goal is eight weddings a year and I do believe we will make our goal.  The church hosted 8 weddings in 2017.

I am happy to say that School #9 has quite a few churches helping them out.  My contact still wants us to stay on board for school supplies which I do in conjunction with Christ Church Pittsford.  I always enjoy working with the ladies from CCP as we put the school bags and uniform items together for the excited students.  School #9 knows though they can always contact us if there is a need.

We continue to host our annual events of the Antiphon celebration in December and 12th Night or in this year’s case our Epiphany Celebration and the Annual Meeting Luncheon held in January.  A wedding reception and dinner was held after a small wedding service this past November and was very well received.  Three funeral receptions were held also this past year.  We also had a going away luncheon for Marianne this past summer.

GARDEN – Deb VanderBilt

The garden group—Kitty Jospe, Lois & Alan Jones, Deb VanderBilt, Tom Foster, Joe McCutchon and other parish members and Sagamore residents—had a good year in the garden due to plentiful rain. Many neighbors and visitors are in our garden on a daily basis, and we get appreciative comments about its beauty all the time. We love sharing the garden with ROCO art as well.  We dealt with vandalism to the center urn by strengthening its core, and believe it is more immune from efforts to push it over now. We can always use more hands during the early summer weeding season and the fall leaf-raking season. Contributions that go primarily toward mulching costs (about $2,000/year) are always welcome. 

Crucial Need: We announce our garden work days in advance in the bulletin and responses to those work days are what would be most helpful for this group. 

LECTORS AND INTERCESSORS – Kevin Finnigan

The Lectors and Intercessors are responsible for reading the lessons and Prayers of the People at services throughout the year.  Parishioners who are interested and not yet members of “the team” are encouraged to join us.  Lectors read about 4-5 times a year, and Intercessors about once a month. 

PROPERTY COMMITTEE – Kyle Liddell

The Property Committee monitors the status of the building and property, and works with external organizations for larger repair efforts. Over the past year, we have been working towards our Lawn Street Wall repair (which will happen this summer!), coordinating with the Campaign Committee in planning for the remaining work in the nave, investigating lighting improvements, and managing roof and other building maintenance.

QUILTERS – Ann Piato

We have presented 36 handmade quilts to newly baptized members as they join Christ Church, 31 for infants and 5 for adults (3 for staff). We also made the quilt hanging in the hallway in honor of the 150th anniversary of the founding of the Church. Lucy Alonzo and Marianne Sickles received quilts in honor of their service to Christ Church, and we made a quilt for Ruth Ferguson to honor her first year as our rector (with pieces of fabric donated by the congregation). The quilters of Christ Church are Eleanor Peet, Ann Piato and Pat Kingsley.

RAIHN – Beatrice Deshommes

Rochester Area Interfaith Hospitality Network (RAIHN) helps homeless families become independent by providing shelter, food and case management.  Community churches provide housing and/or volunteers to support this work. We are in need of more volunteers to help sustain this ministry. 

Go to  www.raihn.org for more information. Contact Beatrice Deshommes 585-880-7029 for information on becoming a Christ Church RAIHN volunteer

SANCTUARY AT CHRIST CHURCH – Lucie Parfitt and Rev. Ruth Ferguson

“Sanctuary at Christ Church” is an outreach support team, with “sanctuary” being a symbolic term for how we serve Christ with our building and with our hearts. In addition to supporting  A Meal and More, RAIHN, and the Angel Tree, we invited parishioners to participate in “Walk for Water” for Sudan; an interfaith gathering at Temple B’rith Kodesh to support Project Homeless Connect; a harvest dinner to honor farm workers, and hosted  the Drawdown Series (climate advocacy)in the Guild Room. [Outreach Team: the Rev’d Ruth Ferguson, Lucie Parfitt, and Sue Hughes Smith]

 

 

SONG – Val Jutsum

The SONG is the newsletter for Christ Church Rochester. It is a digital publication that changes themes with the seasons of the liturgical year. The actual content changes frequently, as often as daily, sometimes. It includes eight distinct sections. They are the cover section (Song) which has an editor’s note, Ruth’s essay, and Stephen Kennedy’s music notes. The next section is a blog of Ruth’s sermons in audio form. The section called News and Events has activities and things parishioners wish to share with the other members of the parish and due to the world wide audience of the internet, the world. The music event gallery shows the ongoing music activities and contributors and the chapel gallery is a collection of photographs of the Mary Chapel intended for the private reflection of our visitors as an aid to prayer and meditation. There is a contact page where anyone can leave a message, suggestion, or comment. The archive section has all of the back issues, but because it is set up like a blog post, the most recent issue is on top and the previous issues are below in chronological order going back to the very first issue. There is also a donate section. This is set up to take credit card donations. Anyone, parishioner or casual visitor can make a donation, by credit card from this page.

We also send out a small number of paper printed copies for those parishioners who have requested it, typically people who do not have access to a computer, tablet, smartphone, or internet.

The SONG also contains in every section, lots of music and art, much of it original. It can’t be seen anywhere but here. The music is taken from our service recordings as well as professionally made recordings of the Schola Cantorum. It is world class.

Below is a breakdown of the number of visits the SONG had last year and last month.

My hope for the SONG is that people would enjoy reading it, share it with their friends, both in the parish and outside it, and invest themselves creatively by submitting items for publication. We have a very talented and dedicated group of people. I want them to use their voices. I want them to be seen and heard.

SPIRITUAL FORMATION – Kyle Liddell and Rev. Ruth Ferguson

This year we have a “formation team” planning and creating programs for study, prayer, and faith sharing throughout the 2017-2018 academic year. In October/November we held book study on NT Wright’s “Surprised by Hope: Rethinking Heaven, the Resurrection, and the Mission of the Church.” In November/December, we welcomed the Rev’d Bill Peterson to three lunch studies to present on the history and theology of Advent and its liturgies from his book, “What are We Waiting For? Re-imagining Advent for Time to Come.”  In January / February, the Rector will lead an Inquirer’s Class for those new to the Episcopal Church and/or seeking  baptism, confirmation or reception into the church.  In February/ March, the Formation Team will lead a contemplative prayer and study program, and Dr. Mark Brummit will lead a Lenten academic study on the book of Amos. Adults and youth welcome to any and all. [Formation Team: The Rev’d Ruth Ferguson, Kyle Liddell, Kristy Liddell, Jennifer Anstey, John Urban] 

STEWARDSHIP – Pru Kirkpatrick

Stewardship is the ongoing exercise of discernment for individuals and for our parish. The Stewardship Committee specifically plans and organizes the kick-off of the fall campaign. How do we best use the resources we are given?  Programs, ongoing expenses, outreach, to name a few, require dollars. The Stewardship Team works with church leaders to make our parish’s mission possible. The group begins its work in late summer to plan Stewardship events for September through November. More volunteers for this committee are very welcome! If you would like to join us, please contact Pru Kirkpatrick (585) 442-7224.

SUNDAY SCHOOL – Emily Brennan

Sunday School is comprised of two separate components, nursery for younger children, and a lesson for the older kids. Nursery, essentially, keeps younger kids entertained via toys or crafts to better allow their parents to enjoy the service. The lesson for the older kids, is made up of three parts. First, we have five to ten minutes of free time for play and socialization. Then we read one (sometimes both) of that week’s readings from The Children’s Illustrated Bible, and we finish with a craft or activity related to the reading. For questions or more information, feel free to email Emily Brennan at eeb02971@sjfc.edu.

 Crucial Need: Craft supplies, excluding crayons and colored pencils

TUESDAY BOOK GROUP – Shirley Ricker

The Tuesday morning book group reads widely, this year especially so.  We explored David Brooks’  thoughts on “an older moral ecology” in his The Road to Character. In Raymond E. Brown’s The Churches the Apostles Left Behind we read how seven apostolic communities uniquely adapted the Christian message.  We learned how being late in a fast-paced technological world that could be a blessing in Tom Friedman’s  Thank You For Being Late Most recently we discovered how the biographer A.N. Wilson views the apostle Paul in his Paul: the Mind of an Apostle.  Everyone is welcome (drop-ins included) to our worship service at 9 (Eucharist the first two Tuesdays of the month, Morning Prayer the rest of the month) and to the book discussion, coffee, and treats that follow.  Special thanks to Mary Anne Wickett for giving us Morning Prayer, and to Ruth for giving us Eucharist.  

USHERS – Joe McCutchon

The Ushers have gone through a couple of minor changes to make the offertory more inclusive of the congregation at the 11am service. Thus, the plate collection is more interactive, and the elements of bread and wine are presented by someone from the pews other than an usher. Also, it is always helpful to have new volunteers especially for holy days and evening services. 

Finance Report to Christ Church Rochester

28 January 2017

Finance Committee              

Norm Geil, Co-Chair

Meg Mackey, Co-Chair

Kathy Brennan

Ron Vukman

Committee Responsibilities

The Christ Church Finance Committee has the responsibility, in conjunction with the Vestry, Treasurer and Rector, to oversee the financial condition and well-being of the parish. It makes recommendations to the Vestry on all financial matters deemed appropriate by the Committee or requested by the Vestry, including among other activities: preparing an annual budget; monitoring investments and operating expenses and income; arranging for audits; and providing a report for the annual parish meeting.

2018 Budget

Understanding how The Church’s funds are applied – and managing them responsibly – is an important part of the Committee’s charter.

2018 Annual Pledges … Good News!

When we presented the 2017 Budget, it reflected a projected deficit of $63,500. Thanks to YOUR generosity, we reduced that amount by 60%!!! 

And that generosity has continued into 2018. As of 1/22/18, we are down just one pledging unit (household), and the amount of annual pledges has grown, notably in higher amount pledge groups. Our projected “envelopes” income for 2018 is up as well, from $194,000 in 2017, to $206,000 in 2018. Thank you, thank you, thank you!

Grant Status

While not part of the Finance Committee, the Committee supports the efforts of a small but mighty team, led by Warden Deb Vanderbilt, with support from Tom Foster, Peg Britt, Meg Mackey, and Hugh Kierig (member emeritus). 


Christmas and Epiphany 2017-2018

photo credit and animation- David CFC Jutsum©2017

photo credit and animation- David CFC Jutsum©2017

CHRIST CHURCH        Christmas and Epiphany  2017-2018

Rochester, NY        The SONG                  vol. 3 issue  2

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Ruth's column

The Feast of The Holy Name 2018

“She will bear a son,” the angel spoke from a dream to Joseph, “and you shall call his name Jesus, for he will save his people from their sins.” As otherworldly as the announcement was, yet the naming itself is a very human moment, one bound up in the faithful religious practice of the parents, the name itself  bound up with Jesus’ own human journey. The naming is also a divine moment, one that binds Jesus’ human identity with God, his name meaning, more or less, GOD saves. We call him Jesus in English by way of the Greek: Yeshuah, possibly Yehoshua. As the child derives his own being from the being of God, so His name derives in part from God’s name: ehyeh asher ehyeh, I am who am; I will be with you as who I am – as the child himself carries all the power and promise of Yahweh’s salvation, so the child’s name carries within it all of the power and the promise of the very Name of God. All that I AM meant to the people who waited for him, for Emmanuel, for God with us, the promise of that name fulfilled in the naming of the child.

His name was called Jesus. It was a common name in his day (not uncommon in our own). But unlike other names, the name was given him by the angel before He was conceived in the womb.  Yeshuah was not merely a name Joseph and Mary gave to the child, but from all eternity this child was given the name Yeshuah, the child who is both God and man: the God who saves by becoming man.  The name signifies not only who he is: the name from the moment of the Incarnation becomes holy because it is a name from the depths of God Himself.  

If this strikes us as odd - the idea of the holiness of a NAME – it is probably because what really strikes us as odd is the very idea of the holy, period.  We say the word easily enough - we confess one holy Catholic and apostolic Church: but what does the word really mean to us today?  We can chalk it up to secularism, as always, but the loss of the holy is especially heightened in a culture of increasing narcissm. In a world where we see ourselves at the center – in all of the ways we do that- our righteous notions (guided and misguided) about human progress, consumption of self-help books, our designation of time off as “me time,” It is in true solitude (not me time) that we encounter the holy. 

Holiness can exist only if we believe that we are not the center of being, only if we accept the possibility of something or someone extraordinary beyond our comprehension, only know at least a whiff of fear and trembling at the center of our lives.  For the most part, a holy person today someone who does the right thing. The phrase: holier than thou, says it all.  That’s the narcism, because holiness is not something we aspire to. The holy is so drastically different from us, outside of us, and wholly other. It’s easy to forget this, but when you remember, it hones your vision. [reference to Starbucks coffee cup on the altar]

In its orgins, the Eucharist was actually perceived as an an action rather than human words and human activity.. an intermingling of divine and human activity. There was a time when people were in awe, and waited and watched for the glimmers into the presence of the Divine that went beyond mere doctrine about the Real Presence. That is pretty much what we witness today on the Feast of the Holy Name: the intermingling of Divine and Human activity in such a way that something as simple as a name becomes sacramental. While the rest of the world hunkers in this morning to keep warm and recover from whatever bombastic New Year’s celebrations happened last night, here, in the quiet solitude of this little chapel we witness the turning of time and the waking of new life as we celebrate the naming of a newborn long ago..as we witness the holiness of that event that still surrounds us because the name from the moment of the Incarnation became holy...and like the Eucharist we celebrate in his name, it comes from the depths of God himself.

See you in church,

Ruth+

Did you know that Ruth has a blog? It's beautiful and you can find it here-

https://christchurchrochester.tumblr.com/

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Notes from Stephen Kennedy

MUSIC NOTES FROM STEPHEN

 

The season of Advent is rich with music expressing longing, waiting, impending joy, and celebration. Below are a few examples of anthems and motets that will be performed within Sunday Eucharists by the Christ Church Choir and at Compline by the Schola Cantorum.  

 

Oculi omnium                                                   Charles Wood (1866-1926)

 

Translation: The eyes of all wait upon thee, [O Lord]; and thou givest them their meat in due season.

Thou openest thine hand, and satisfiest the desire of every living thing. Alleluia.

For my flesh is meat indeed, and my blood is drink indeed.

He that eateth my flesh, and drinketh my blood, dwelleth in me, and I in him.Alleluia.

 

Tollite hostias                                                      Camille Saint-Saëns (1835-1921)

Translation: Raise the hosts, and worship God in his holy court. 

May the heaven rejoice, and may the earth dance before the face of God, for He comes. 

Hallelujah!

 

Veni redemptor gentium                                     Jacob Handl (1550-1591)

Translation: Come, redeemer of the peoples, and show the birth from a Virgin; every age shall acclaimthat such a birth befits God.

 

The Lamb                                                              John Tavener (1944-2013)

Little Lamb who made thee 

Dost thou know who made thee 

Gave thee life & bid thee feed. 

By the stream & o'er the mead; 

Gave thee clothing of delight, 

Softest clothing wooly bright; 

Gave thee such a tender voice, 

Making all the vales rejoice!  

Little Lamb who made thee 

Dost thou know who made thee  

Little Lamb I'll tell thee, 

He is called by thy name, 

For he calls himself a Lamb: 

He is meek & he is mild, 

He became a little child: 

I a child & thou a lamb, 

We are called by his name. 

Little Lamb God bless thee.  

 

Ave Maria                                                               Camille Saint-Saëns (1835-1921)

Translation: Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou among women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and in the hour of our death. Amen.

Stephen Kennedy
Music Director
Christ Church Rochester
Instructor of Sacred Music
Eastman School of Music

Bonus!

This improvisation attempts to reflect the bold themes of the Martin Luther’s text of “Nun comma, der Heiden Heiland” which is based on text of Ambrose of Milan (340-397).  All verses of this hymn are not in our hymnal but are listed here as translated by William M. Reynolds.

1 Savior of the nations, come, 
virgin's Son, make here Thy home!
Marvel now, O heav'n and earth,
that the Lord chose such a birth.

2 Not by human flesh and blood,
but the Spirit of our God,
was the Word of God made flesh--
woman's Offspring, pure and fresh.

3 Wondrous birth! O wondrous Child
Of the Virgin undefiled!
Though by all the world disowned,
still to be in heav'n enthroned.

4 From the Father forth He came
and returneth to the same,
captive leading death and hell--
high the song of triumph swell!

5 Thou the Father's only Son,
hast o'er sin the vict'ry won.
Boundless shall Thy kingdom be;
when shall we its glories see?

6 Brightly doth Thy manger shine,
glorious is its light divine.
Let not sin o'ercloud this light;
ever be our faith thus bright.

7 Praise to God the Father sing,
Praise to God the Son, our King,
Praise to God the Spirit be
Ever and eternally. 

 

(I call it Awesome!)

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EVENTS

EVENTS and ANNOUNCEMENTS in This Issue

Capital Campaign Kickoff

Upcoming Music Event Poster

Third Sunday Lecture Series and Compline

Roger Freitas

The Counter Reformation and the Baroque Aesthetic

Latest Sunday Bulletin and Audio of the 11:00 am Eucharist

(when you click on an image below it will become full size and you can scroll through the pages)

12th NIGHT CELEBRATION- audio recording

(although it was the 26th night after Christmas)

Bulletin for the Solemnity of the Nativity 10:30 pm

audio of the Festal Eucharist

ANNUAL MEETING- January 28th, 2018

text of agenda 

Minute Ministries

Candlelight Concert Schedule 2017-2018

The Care Team

GRANTS UPDATE

Vestry Minutes

Capital Campaign Kickoff

Third Sunday Lectures and Compline

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Feast of Christmas Eve (Solemnity of the Nativity)

Christ Church     Annual Parish Meeting     January 28, 2018

Prayer and Rector’s Opening Remarks The Rev’d Ruth Ferguson    

 

Updates/Greetings from Community Partners Bleu Cease, ROCO

Lois Jones, A Meal & More

Chef Alan Callerame & William Drayton

Emily Brennan

Nominations for Warden and Vestry Kyle Liddell

  • Warden for 2-year term
  • Three vestry persons for 3-year terms
  • 1 Vestry person for 1-year fill-in term
  • Open spot for 2-year fill-in term

Open Ballot

Voting members are 18 years or older, have been baptized for at least 12 months, are regular attendants at worship, and contribute to the support of the parish.

Report on Parish ministries

Music Program Lydia Kirkpatrick

Spiritual Formation Kyle Liddell

Outreach Lucie Parfitt

Finance Committee Meg Mackey and Norm Geil

Capital Campaign Lucie Parfitt

Warden’s Remarks Deb VanderBilt

Close Ballot The Rev’d Ruth Ferguson

Closing Prayer The Rev’d Ruth Ferguson

 

REPORT on the Music Program

Stephen Kennedy, Music Director

Christ Church Music Program

Special thanks and appreciation is due to each of you for your participation in music at Christ Church. Whether singing a chant or hymn, listening to a prelude or postlude, or honing a motet in a rehearsal, we are all celebrating something important together as a family through music and we do it with love. We are grateful for the support and work of our Rector Ruth Ferguson, Wardens Deborah Vanderbilt and Kyle Liddell, the Vestry, Pat Knapp, and Moses Roland. We also want to thank our Associate organists David Higgs and William Porter for contributing so generously of their time and talent. They also help with mentoring and teaching our parish musicians and VanDelinder Fellows. Our VanDelinder Fellows Joshua Ehlebracht, Henry Webb, and Alden Wright also deserve tremendous thanks for all their great work in our parish.  Our Eastman-Christ Church Choral Scholar, Adam Sadberry; Choral Scholar, Evan Ritter; and Music Scholar, Thatcher Lyman (Assistant Director of the Schola Cantorum) also contribute greatly to music at Christ Church. It is so exciting to see such growth in liturgical music skills from these dedicated young musicians. We are also extremely grateful to Christopher Huebner, Schola librarian and coordinator, as well as our dedicated teem of Compline Ushers. Continued thanks and appreciation goes to the members of our parish ensembles as listed below:

 

Goals from 2017 – ongoing in 2018

  1. Attract more people to Christ Church through our music program Goal on target
  2. Raise the level of musicianship in CC ensembles Goal on target
  3. Raise community awareness of our rich and diverse music program Goal on target
  4. Foster the education and training of musicians in liturgical music skills Goal on target
  5. Engage people from the larger community (non parishioners) to help fund 

our parish music program Goal on target

  1. Install professional recording equipment in the church to record CC Choir, 

Youth Ensemble, Consort, CC liturgies, and concerts     Working on installation date

7.   Fundraising to support our parish music program Goal on target

8.   Strengthen existing community collaborations and partnerships in music Goal on target

 

Opportunities for individuals to assist and contribute in our parish music program  

  1. Compline ushers and Candle-lighters   Team is in place, but more are welcome
  2. Greeters at Tuesday Pipes to represent the parish   Alan Jones is our regular; others are welcome 
  3. Volunteers to help send publicity to media via e-mail   Help in this would be great
  4. People to help set up for Compline following the 11:00   CC Choir members could use assistance

Eucharist  

  1. People to assist in searching for grants and grant writing     Volunteers needed

REPORTS on Christ Church Programs and Volunteer Opportunities

Along with pledging, the donation of one’s time to parish organizations and working groups has a tremendous impact on the vitality of the church. Below you’ll see a list of all the groups and tasks working at Christ Church. Groups with a crucial need have those needs in bold print, but all the groups welcome new volunteers. Please read the list and see what might match your interests and skills. 

A MEAL AND MORE – Lois Jones

 

In order to sustain, A Meal and More, now beginning its 39th year, it takes the cooperation and effort of: Christ Church Rochester; A Meal and More, Inc. Board Members; Hundreds of Volunteers, from both Episcopal and non-Episcopal churches; an experienced and competent Chef; a pleasant and watchful Greeter and a germ conscious and helpful Dishwasher.

It is truly startling to find out that 1 out of every 6 people in the United States is considered food challenged. 8130 meals were served during 2017 by A Meal and More. The Elderly are a very consistent presence. Between 140 and 270 meals were served to them every month this year, as compared to between 150 and 200 meals per month last year. The number of meals to Children nearly doubled with 40 meals per month being served to Children compared to approximately 25 meals per month last year. Adults – make up the largest group we feed with approximately 500 meals served to this group each month which is down by about 100 meals per month from last year but those meals are now being served to the Elderly and Children. 

The 3 men who faithfully feed our Urban poor are: Allen Callerame, Chef; William Drayton, Greeter and Nick Donofrio, Dishwasher.

We want to THANK all the members of Christ Church for your faithful and continued support of A Meal and More, Inc.’s Ministry. --Lois Jones, Vice President and Kristy Liddell, Volunteer Coordinator 

ALTAR GUILD – Bill Soleim

 

The Altar Guild is a group of men and women who works mostly behind the scenes to prepare for services on Sunday. Our ministry involves caring for the vestments, vessels, and altar linens of Christ Church. We usually work in pairs to set up for Sunday’s services at 9:30 on Saturday morning (for about 1 hour). After the 11:00 service, we take about 20 minutes to wash communion vessels and put away vestments. We each serve one a week per month, but many of us also work together on Christmas and Easter to decorate the sanctuary. If you think you would enjoy serving God and our congregation in this quiet ministry, please contact Bill Soleim. 

Crucial need: A partner for an altar guild member currently serving alone on SECOND and FOURTH Sundays of the month.

ANGEL TREES – Eleanor Peet

 

This outreach program is the collection of Christmas gifts for the women clients, and their families, of the Willow Domestic Violence Center (formerly known as Alternatives for Battered Women). The Center provides us with a wish list. Paper Angels with suggestions written on them decorate two trees that are placed in the sanctuary and the Guild Room each December. Parishioners take an angel or two and bring their gifts unwrapped back to church to be brought to the Center mid-December. Willow Center says: “over 70% of domestic violence crimes are witnessed by children. A simple gesture of providing new toys during their stay can give a child in crisis a sense of normalcy and hope.”

 

BIRTHDAY CARDS – Carolyn Mauro

A delightful task that we on the birthday card team have is to send greetings to every member of our parish family whose birthday we have on record at the parish office. This is a small but, we’ve heard, enjoyed yearly acknowledgment of your importance to our parish family—you’re all a vital part of us. We’re all grateful for your presence and giving of your talents to Christ Church’s mission, so the cards are a small but sincere reminder of that to you. Crucial Need: Several members have not shared their “special day” with us, and if you have chosen not to participate, we understand. However, if you have been with Christ Church for a while and have not been acknowledged, or if you are new to us, and would like to receive a yearly card, please notify the parish office at your earliest convenience. Thank you.

A GIFT AND A PROMISE CAPITAL CAMPAIGN COMMITTEE REPORT – Joe Schaller

The members of the committee are: The Rev. Ruth Ferguson; Gail Lynch; Lucy Parfitt; Joseph Schaller, chairperson; Bill Soleim; John Urban; and Deb Vanderbilt. The committee is grateful for the opportunity to serve Christ Church.

The Christ Church building needs repair. If we are to continue to worship and fulfill our great commission, as Christians, in this building, the repairs must be done as soon as possible. Because our operating funds are insufficient to pay for the capital improvements, the Christ Church Vestry decided to initiate a capital campaign. A campaign committee was formed, and the campaign was named A Gift and a Promise. Your Gift is for our near-term needs and it is also a Promise – because it secures our future. The campaign goal is $1 million. Demonstrating their commitment to the campaign each member of the vestry has pledged a gift. 

In the spring of 2017 a capital campaign consultant was briefly retained. Dissatisfied with the consultant, the relationship was terminated, and the capital campaign committee assumed the responsibilities for the day-to-day operational management of the campaign. The committee has been meeting on a weekly basis since August 2017. Campaign polices, collateral materials and an administrative infrastructure were created. Fundraising plans were determined and initiated for parishioners, friends of Christ Church and external organizations. 

To date the campaign has raised through gifts, pledges and grants… Apologies for the tease but to find out the amount raised and other important details of the campaign, and your vital role we cordially invite you to A Gift and a Promise kick-off celebration on Sunday, February 11 following the 11 AM service. 

CARE TEAM – Norma Kurmis and Elizabeth Dugdale

The Meals Care Team has 8 active members. We have provided several meals to 4 families since the summer. The team will bring meals on a temporary basis to parishioners who have suffered bereavement, have a new baby or are home from the hospital, for example. If anyone knows of a family who could use a little extra help with a meal or two, please contact Ruth with your request. Sometimes the requests can come in quickly, so anyone who is willing to donate their time and meal-prep skills to the team would be welcomed! If you are interested in joining us, please let me know at lotusmom2000@hotmail.com.

Home Visits currently has 10 members who arrange amongst themselves to go a visit a fellow member of our church when notified who is in need of a little bit of society but cannot get to church! We have (luckily) only been called upon to arrange visits for a total of 3 fellow church members over the past year. I believe we have done a good job in dividing up the visits and find these interactions & chances to socialize highly rewarding, but as the head of this group, I confess: I have done a poor job in double checking in with my teammates and apologize...Sorry ya'll! We are always welcoming more people to add their name to the list to go visit a church family members when they are in need of some company so please email Elizabeth Dugdale at emother@gmail.com if you would like to join! (And/or if you have any suggestions).  If you need a meal or a visit from the Care Team, call or email the Rector and she will let the Care Team know.  

COMMUNICATION COMMITTEE – Kyle Liddell

The communications committee is composed of the maintainers of the CC website, The Song, the Facebook page, our paper brochures and advertisements, and other publicity efforts.  Follow our church activities in The Song and on Facebook and share them with others.

FORUM – Mary Vukman

The Forum is a study and discussion group that meets on Sunday mornings.   Most recently, we have been reading the Letter of James slowly and inquisitively.  We ask a lot of questions and toss around a lot of maybe's, hoping to better understand our our Christian heritage and calling.  Watch the bulletin for a new topic coming soon.   Then join us any Sunday 9:45 -10:45 am in the Guild Room. 

FOYERS – Val Jutsum

Foyers is our name for small informal groups of Christ Church parishioners who meet for a meal. They are a wonderful way, whether you are relatively new to the church or a long-time member, to meet and get to know other Christ Church members.

Foyers groups are composed of 6-8 people who meet once a month in each others’ homes for a simple dinner. Each person hosts one dinner during the “season,” and it is a simple dinner (not potluck) lasting from about 6 to 9 p.m.  There is no agenda, just fun and fellowship! Because of Rochester weather, the “Foyers season” at Christ Church is April to October.  

Do you have small children? In the past, we have offered the choice to specify if you would like to be in a group with others with small children. Please note your choice about that when signing up below.

Are you thinking “I don’t have space for 8-10 people to sit around a dining table”? Don't let that stop you! Dinners can be informal--we can balance plates on our laps! We can picnic! All who want to be part of Foyers are welcome.

This past Foyer Season didn’t occur. The number of interested participants wasn’t enough to make a group(s). 

Crucial need: Interested people to eat a meal and have fun.

CHANCEL TEAM: Acolyte, Crucifer, Subdeacon, Thurifer, Verger – Jim Bement

 

At all celebrations of the Liturgy, it is fitting that the principal celebrant, whether bishop or priest, be assisted by other priests, and by deacons and lay persons.” (BCP, 322 & 354).  When serving at the altar, members of the chancel team are fulfilling those directions of the Book of Common Prayer. We are aware that the purpose of assisting at the altar is “that God may be glorified.” Since last year’s report, we have added 5 members to the Team including 1 youth.  To reinitiate the position of Verger in our services we will need two or three additional members.  Training as to what to do as well as why we do it will be provided at your convenience.  Please contact me or the Rector if you wish to explore this service to our parish and to God. --Jim Bement, 585.734.5756, jhbement@rochester.rr.com

JAZZ FESTIVAL – Carlos Mercado

 

Each June, our parish welcomes over 6,000 music lovers to our building to enjoy what has become one of the four top jazz festivals in the world and the largest gathering of British Isles musicians outside of England.  This was the tenth year that we have hosted the “Made In the UK” Series, and it is possible only because of a group of dedicated parish and community volunteers.  Having been designed as a Community Outreach event, it covers our out-of-pocket costs and affords an opportunity to showcase our historic building.  As a result of the festival and press coverage, the name “Christ Church Rochester, NY” is well known in UK jazz circles, and we enjoy an excellent reputation for our hospitality and the quality of our facilities.  We look forward to our 11th year in just a few months. Team: Carlos Mercado. Joe and Vicki McCutcheon

COFFEE HOUR, SCHOOL 9, MEALS for NEW PARENTS, WEDDINGS & SPECIAL EVENTS [phew!]         – Vicki McCutchon

Coffee hour is a well- oiled machine.  We have a great crew that continue to provide tasty and quenching treats and bring us all together to catch up with one another.

This is a fun year for weddings and Meals for New Parents, because we have sisters having babies within weeks of one another and we have two parishioner weddings this summer.  In addition to our two parishioner weddings there are 4 other weddings on the books.  The goal is eight weddings a year and I do believe we will make our goal.  The church hosted 8 weddings in 2017.

I am happy to say that School #9 has quite a few churches helping them out.  My contact still wants us to stay on board for school supplies which I do in conjunction with Christ Church Pittsford.  I always enjoy working with the ladies from CCP as we put the school bags and uniform items together for the excited students.  School #9 knows though they can always contact us if there is a need.

We continue to host our annual events of the Antiphon celebration in December and 12th Night or in this year’s case our Epiphany Celebration and the Annual Meeting Luncheon held in January.  A wedding reception and dinner was held after a small wedding service this past November and was very well received.  Three funeral receptions were held also this past year.  We also had a going away luncheon for Marianne this past summer.

GARDEN – Deb VanderBilt

The garden group—Kitty Jospe, Lois & Alan Jones, Deb VanderBilt, Tom Foster, Joe McCutchon and other parish members and Sagamore residents—had a good year in the garden due to plentiful rain. Many neighbors and visitors are in our garden on a daily basis, and we get appreciative comments about its beauty all the time. We love sharing the garden with ROCO art as well.  We dealt with vandalism to the center urn by strengthening its core, and believe it is more immune from efforts to push it over now. We can always use more hands during the early summer weeding season and the fall leaf-raking season. Contributions that go primarily toward mulching costs (about $2,000/year) are always welcome. 

Crucial Need: We announce our garden work days in advance in the bulletin and responses to those work days are what would be most helpful for this group. 

LECTORS AND INTERCESSORS – Kevin Finnigan

The Lectors and Intercessors are responsible for reading the lessons and Prayers of the People at services throughout the year.  Parishioners who are interested and not yet members of “the team” are encouraged to join us.  Lectors read about 4-5 times a year, and Intercessors about once a month. 

PROPERTY COMMITTEE – Kyle Liddell

The Property Committee monitors the status of the building and property, and works with external organizations for larger repair efforts. Over the past year, we have been working towards our Lawn Street Wall repair (which will happen this summer!), coordinating with the Campaign Committee in planning for the remaining work in the nave, investigating lighting improvements, and managing roof and other building maintenance.

QUILTERS – Ann Piato

We have presented 36 handmade quilts to newly baptized members as they join Christ Church, 31 for infants and 5 for adults (3 for staff). We also made the quilt hanging in the hallway in honor of the 150th anniversary of the founding of the Church. Lucy Alonzo and Marianne Sickles received quilts in honor of their service to Christ Church, and we made a quilt for Ruth Ferguson to honor her first year as our rector (with pieces of fabric donated by the congregation). The quilters of Christ Church are Eleanor Peet, Ann Piato and Pat Kingsley.

RAIHN – Beatrice Deshommes

Rochester Area Interfaith Hospitality Network (RAIHN) helps homeless families become independent by providing shelter, food and case management.  Community churches provide housing and/or volunteers to support this work. We are in need of more volunteers to help sustain this ministry. 

Go to  www.raihn.org for more information. Contact Beatrice Deshommes 585-880-7029 for information on becoming a Christ Church RAIHN volunteer

SANCTUARY AT CHRIST CHURCH – Lucie Parfitt and Rev. Ruth Ferguson

“Sanctuary at Christ Church” is an outreach support team, with “sanctuary” being a symbolic term for how we serve Christ with our building and with our hearts. In addition to supporting  A Meal and More, RAIHN, and the Angel Tree, we invited parishioners to participate in “Walk for Water” for Sudan; an interfaith gathering at Temple B’rith Kodesh to support Project Homeless Connect; a harvest dinner to honor farm workers, and hosted  the Drawdown Series (climate advocacy)in the Guild Room. [Outreach Team: the Rev’d Ruth Ferguson, Lucie Parfitt, and Sue Hughes Smith]

 

 

SONG – Val Jutsum

The SONG is the newsletter for Christ Church Rochester. It is a digital publication that changes themes with the seasons of the liturgical year. The actual content changes frequently, as often as daily, sometimes. It includes eight distinct sections. They are the cover section (Song) which has an editor’s note, Ruth’s essay, and Stephen Kennedy’s music notes. The next section is a blog of Ruth’s sermons in audio form. The section called News and Events has activities and things parishioners wish to share with the other members of the parish and due to the world wide audience of the internet, the world. The music event gallery shows the ongoing music activities and contributors and the chapel gallery is a collection of photographs of the Mary Chapel intended for the private reflection of our visitors as an aid to prayer and meditation. There is a contact page where anyone can leave a message, suggestion, or comment. The archive section has all of the back issues, but because it is set up like a blog post, the most recent issue is on top and the previous issues are below in chronological order going back to the very first issue. There is also a donate section. This is set up to take credit card donations. Anyone, parishioner or casual visitor can make a donation, by credit card from this page.

We also send out a small number of paper printed copies for those parishioners who have requested it, typically people who do not have access to a computer, tablet, smartphone, or internet.

The SONG also contains in every section, lots of music and art, much of it original. It can’t be seen anywhere but here. The music is taken from our service recordings as well as professionally made recordings of the Schola Cantorum. It is world class.

Below is a breakdown of the number of visits the SONG had last year and last month.

My hope for the SONG is that people would enjoy reading it, share it with their friends, both in the parish and outside it, and invest themselves creatively by submitting items for publication. We have a very talented and dedicated group of people. I want them to use their voices. I want them to be seen and heard.

SPIRITUAL FORMATION – Kyle Liddell and Rev. Ruth Ferguson

This year we have a “formation team” planning and creating programs for study, prayer, and faith sharing throughout the 2017-2018 academic year. In October/November we held book study on NT Wright’s “Surprised by Hope: Rethinking Heaven, the Resurrection, and the Mission of the Church.” In November/December, we welcomed the Rev’d Bill Peterson to three lunch studies to present on the history and theology of Advent and its liturgies from his book, “What are We Waiting For? Re-imagining Advent for Time to Come.”  In January / February, the Rector will lead an Inquirer’s Class for those new to the Episcopal Church and/or seeking  baptism, confirmation or reception into the church.  In February/ March, the Formation Team will lead a contemplative prayer and study program, and Dr. Mark Brummit will lead a Lenten academic study on the book of Amos. Adults and youth welcome to any and all. [Formation Team: The Rev’d Ruth Ferguson, Kyle Liddell, Kristy Liddell, Jennifer Anstey, John Urban] 

STEWARDSHIP – Pru Kirkpatrick

Stewardship is the ongoing exercise of discernment for individuals and for our parish. The Stewardship Committee specifically plans and organizes the kick-off of the fall campaign. How do we best use the resources we are given?  Programs, ongoing expenses, outreach, to name a few, require dollars. The Stewardship Team works with church leaders to make our parish’s mission possible. The group begins its work in late summer to plan Stewardship events for September through November. More volunteers for this committee are very welcome! If you would like to join us, please contact Pru Kirkpatrick (585) 442-7224.

SUNDAY SCHOOL – Emily Brennan

Sunday School is comprised of two separate components, nursery for younger children, and a lesson for the older kids. Nursery, essentially, keeps younger kids entertained via toys or crafts to better allow their parents to enjoy the service. The lesson for the older kids, is made up of three parts. First, we have five to ten minutes of free time for play and socialization. Then we read one (sometimes both) of that week’s readings from The Children’s Illustrated Bible, and we finish with a craft or activity related to the reading. For questions or more information, feel free to email Emily Brennan at eeb02971@sjfc.edu.

 Crucial Need: Craft supplies, excluding crayons and colored pencils

TUESDAY BOOK GROUP – Shirley Ricker

The Tuesday morning book group reads widely, this year especially so.  We explored David Brooks’  thoughts on “an older moral ecology” in his The Road to Character. In Raymond E. Brown’s The Churches the Apostles Left Behind we read how seven apostolic communities uniquely adapted the Christian message.  We learned how being late in a fast-paced technological world that could be a blessing in Tom Friedman’s  Thank You For Being Late Most recently we discovered how the biographer A.N. Wilson views the apostle Paul in his Paul: the Mind of an Apostle.  Everyone is welcome (drop-ins included) to our worship service at 9 (Eucharist the first two Tuesdays of the month, Morning Prayer the rest of the month) and to the book discussion, coffee, and treats that follow.  Special thanks to Mary Anne Wickett for giving us Morning Prayer, and to Ruth for giving us Eucharist.  

USHERS – Joe McCutchon

The Ushers have gone through a couple of minor changes to make the offertory more inclusive of the congregation at the 11am service. Thus, the plate collection is more interactive, and the elements of bread and wine are presented by someone from the pews other than an usher. Also, it is always helpful to have new volunteers especially for holy days and evening services. 

Finance Report to Christ Church Rochester

28 January 2017

Finance Committee               

Norm Geil, Co-Chair

Meg Mackey, Co-Chair

Kathy Brennan

Ron Vukman

Committee Responsibilities

The Christ Church Finance Committee has the responsibility, in conjunction with the Vestry, Treasurer and Rector, to oversee the financial condition and well-being of the parish. It makes recommendations to the Vestry on all financial matters deemed appropriate by the Committee or requested by the Vestry, including among other activities: preparing an annual budget; monitoring investments and operating expenses and income; arranging for audits; and providing a report for the annual parish meeting.

2018 Budget

Understanding how The Church’s funds are applied – and managing them responsibly – is an important part of the Committee’s charter.

2018 Annual Pledges … Good News!

When we presented the 2017 Budget, it reflected a projected deficit of $63,500. Thanks to YOUR generosity, we reduced that amount by 60%!!! 

And that generosity has continued into 2018. As of 1/22/18, we are down just one pledging unit (household), and the amount of annual pledges has grown, notably in higher amount pledge groups. Our projected “envelopes” income for 2018 is up as well, from $194,000 in 2017, to $206,000 in 2018. Thank you, thank you, thank you!

Grant Status

While not part of the Finance Committee, the Committee supports the efforts of a small but mighty team, led by Warden Deb Vanderbilt, with support from Tom Foster, Peg Britt, Meg Mackey, and Hugh Kierig (member emeritus). 

Advent 2017

above cover-  Advent- acrylic on canvas ©2007 Tim Jutsum

above cover-Advent- acrylic on canvas ©2007 Tim Jutsum

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An open letter to Go Bags

Dear Go Bags,

I hope you won’t think me impertinent, referring to you by your new name. But, in fact I only learned of your name last week while listening to a news report about the fires in California. We had been companions on other adventures a few years ago. Perhaps you remember? You would be  ready with various things in anticipation of the arrival of a new member of our family. I admit that I mostly neglected you on those outings. As it turned out, I never stayed long enough to need your services. I commend your faithfulness, though. You were always at the ready and always on the job.

I understand that your new work is much more stressful. I heard that you wait by the door, as you did for me. But, now, instead of a baby, a dangerous undertaking in itself as I’m sure you’ll agree, you wait for notice of evacuation to flee an inferno. I admit I had not considered, at all, the dark side of your purpose. Yet, now that it has come to my attention I realize you have always done such work. You are the bag to take when people need to go. You are the bag that carries their choices of what is really important.  

Oh Go Bag, I realize now, that you are just the thing to consider when thinking about Advent.  Be ready. Be vigilant. Know what is important. It is Go or No Go. Be ready to GO.

I realize you were with Them. You made the trip from Nazareth in Galilee to Judea, to the city of David called Bethlehem. That time you were waiting for a baby. So many envy you that trip, although, at the time, I’m sure it didn’t appear to be what it actually was, the WORD made flesh, come among us. Although, a few figured it out. We aren’t waiting for a baby anymore. We do wait in joyful hope of the personal appearance of God again, but, not a baby this time. This time will be the change of everything. Yes, we wait in joyful hope. 

It turns out that hope is what you’re all about, isn’t it? People flee with you in hope of a salvation from war, horror, oppression, famine, fire. You represent our hope as you force us to decide what we care about, what we can go on with. You are bigger than your physical identity. You, Go Bag, by representing Advent, will always be with us, now. You inspire us to be ready to choose to cast away the works of darkness and put on the armor of light now…that at the last day we may rise with Him to Life immortal. I once heard God’s Grace defined as His Love active. We chose to have you hold Grace for us and in that way we will be ready for our dearest longings. Thank you, dear Go Bags, thank you.

Best Wishes,

Val Jutsum

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A sense of something deep, of something more: don’t stop being ready: a few short musings on Advent; SPOILER ALERT: there is no strong conclusion. 

by- David Jutsum

Advent is my favorite season in the church year (which is probably true about every season. But, right now, it’s Advent, so Advent wins, right now.) In Advent we are given a sense of something deep, something more, something in the form of a longing. There’s a feeling in your spirit that there is something on the outside that is reaching out to you, on the inside. There is something coming, there’s more, it’s going to happen. It is like a giant storm, full of beauty, majesty, awe. Advent is about deep things, things too deep for words. things of the spirit. In all probability, the most important things, because, what could be more important than that which the whole Christian world has looked forward to since the first coming? This message comes through words, through hymns, through images, hints and deeply personal experiences.

Advent is a cliffhanger. The Lord is coming again, at a time when we least expect him. When will that be? Nobody knows. Will it happen? Yes, definitely. In the old Saturday morning movie serials, the cliffhanger from last week would be resolved in mere moments: the barrel of dynamite which was about to explode bounced out of the wagon when it rolled over a bump, and exploded harmlessly in some sagebrush. Now, onto this week’s plot. The Advent cliffhanger is a two way street: he is coming in a moment, in the twinkling of an eye: will we be ready?  The five foolish virgins who did not have enough oil stopped being ready. Will I? We are perpetually left waiting for the beginning of the next episode. As of yet, it remains unresolved.

Advent is also like reading science fiction. There is all kinds of wildness, weirdness, creatures, warning, foreboding. You know, end of the world stuff.

Advent is about death. In my way of looking, the Second Coming happens every time someone dies, at least for that person. That which is mortal is swallowed up by Life. “Hark, a thrilling voice is sounding: Christ is nigh, it seems to say!”

Advent is also the time of many important life events for me, personally. My mother died in Advent, when I was sixteen years old. Six  years later, I entered into a deep personal relationship with God, during Advent. two years later, our first son was born, seven weeks premature, on the second Sunday of Advent. 

Advent is a time when God has frequently spoken to me. (I do not hear voices when God speaks to me. Usually, there is a scripture passage which pierces into some place deep inside what I call my spirit. Other times it could happen when someone says something. “Give it to the Lord” is such an example from our lives. We would bring our laundry list of complex problems to our parish priest, and his answer was often, “Well, just give it to the Lord”.  At first it was infuriating, but it stood the test of time, and has achieved mantra status.)

Do you believe in the Holy Spirit? I do. I believe in the Holy Spirit. Let’s talk about the Holy Spirit. The Holy Spirit is God, but we hardly ever talk about him. Sometimes I do. But I kind of put Him on a shelf, if I had to be honest about it. Maybe it’s possible that the Holy Spirit is the home of the mysterious, the brooding, the wonderful, the communication to your spirit from God. You get these inklings, these hints, this super sense of Otherness; Otherness which is there, but not in any hurry to reveal itself, yet it’s there for the taking. You can’t just like manhandle it. You can’t just grab it. I don’t know how you get it. I guess, you mostly just receive it. Back in the old days, it could come in vague feelings. Those WOW moments when it was like, “Wow! I just experienced something intense! I wonder what it was?” I remember some large foundation stones on a church on St. Paul Street, on the way to work. They were marked with moisture stains in melancholy patterns,  which evoked this sense of grandeur and sadness. I believe that was one way the Holy Spirit was informing me that I was actually involved in the midst of drama of the highest degree.

I want to end this mishmash by giving an example from when our first child, David Charles Frederick Cook Jutsum, was born way too soon. After several days, while he was still in intensive care, we sat in the hospital cafeteria, at our wits’ end. A bible verse came to mind: “I go to prepare a place for you. Let not your heart be troubled. For I shall return and dwell with you. Neither be afraid.” It was like magic. We realized that our job was to go home and prepare Davey’s place. It was implied, God would take care of the rest. He was home, under the tree, before Christmas. 

Oftentimes, the Book of Common Prayer has the knack of translating an intensely personal experience into beautiful words: We beseech thee, Almighty God, to purify our consciences by thy daily visitation , that when thy Son Jesus Christ cometh he may find in us a mansion prepared for himself; through the same Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee, in the unity of the Holy Spirit, one God, now and for ever. Amen

art above: Hannah Sommers ©2011 watercolor

art above: Hannah Sommers ©2011 watercolor

Ruth's column

The Second Sunday of Advent in the Early Morning

When I entered the sacristy early last Sunday morning,  the colors in the windows were  beginning to emerge in the early morning light - light from the dark. When a rich yellow morning beam shone a path across the floor, I stepped into it and declared to Norm and Paddy, our faithful 8:00 am sacristan and deacon, “Look at that light! The Kingom of God has come!”

Soon, we would enter the chapel where the second candle of Advent would be lit to signal our preparation for the Master of this House. I was reminded of the old adage, “It is better to light a single candle than to curse the darkness.” We do find ourselves cursing the darkness, cursing change, cursing the economy, cynical about the prospects of peace for Jerusalem or anywhere on earth, frenetic  and frustrated in our complicity with the commercialization of Christmas and getting our shopping done.

Then, I thought, we will soon light the third candle of Advent, and then the fourth , they will burn quietly at our altar, another sign in this season of new life to come. It is such a simple act, to light a candle, yet how incredible profound! Just as God acted out our salvation in the simple act of giving a child to a peasant woman – a strange prescription, was it not, for the sickness of humanity? St. Paul said it so well when he wrote of the “foolishness of God” being wiser than the “wisdom of men.”

These tiny flames, lit by the parishoners of Christ Church each week of Advent, signal a hope burning in the midst of our turbulent times – a hope whose fulfillment is beyond the understanding of economists, world leaders, philosophers and theologians.  Who can understand or explain this event we are awaiting? Words fail us. But when I rang the bell for the early morning service, I wasn’t thinking about what words I could use. I was thinking about the light that had shone in the sacristy, and the light that would be burning on two purple candles in the chapel.

See you in church,

Ruth+

 

The Feast of All Saints

“O blest communion, fellowship divine!

We feebly struggle, they in glory shine;

Yet all are one in thee,

For all are thine.

Alleluia, alleluia!”

 

  • Hymn #287, “For all the saints, who from their labors rest”

 

As many of you know, I fully engage in that hallmark of our Anglican identity, which is openness to ambiguity! My faith is as much about the love of questions as the certainties. When it comes to All Saints Day, I am blessed with certainty.  For as long as I can remember, it has never occurred to me that the people I love who have died don’t hear me when I pray for them.  In fact, before I was taught anything different, I used to pray TO my grandmother. She was the first person I loved and lost. We called her “Angel.” 

For a time after Angel died, she became a regular fixture in my bed time prayer routine. After the Lord’s Prayer, I would give my attention to Angel. I went through God, of course.  I asked God to quiet the streets of heaven so that a message could get through and be heard by my grandmother. It never occurred to me that God didn’t quiet everyone in Heaven briefly to sound my message through the streets by broadcasting my own voice saying the words to Him: “Hi, Angel, it’s Ruth. How are you doing? I am doing fine. I miss you. I love you.”

All of these years later, it still does not occur to me that the ones I love and see no longer do not receive my prayers and join me there. It never occurs to me that we have not been knit together into one communion and fellowship in the mystical body of Christ.

I no longer picture cobbled, Heavenly streets with people bustling about but pausing when prayers and other announcements are given over the celestial intercom. When I am in that space where wordless, contemplative prayer delivers me, I am one with the God who is all in all. All who came before, all who are now, all who will come after; all of time, before time, and beyond time; all of what we can see, know, or believe and all of what we can’t see, know or believe.  The mystics call this “unitive seeing,” but it’s not reserved for mystics only. In this seeing, or “space,” I know beyond any doubt that I am communing with God in whom we live, move and have our being, and communing with all being that lives, moves, and has itself in God! 

Baptisms, Eucharists, music, prayer, liturgies – these guide us to the crossroads, the touch stone,  of the Saints in Heaven and on Earth. But Heaven and earth are also joined together within us when we give ourselves fully over to the presence of God. I no longer envision a veil between Heaven and earth that is temporarily lifted from time to time. I imagine that the great cloud of witnesses surrounding us is as near and present as Lawn Street is outside my office window. As are the saints of God, the souls of our loved ones died to this life, we ourselves and every other living thing that fills the overflowing cup who is God.

See you in church,

Ruth+

 

Did you know that Ruth has a blog? It's beautiful and you can find it here-

https://christchurchrochester.tumblr.com/

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Notes from Stephen Kennedy

MUSIC NOTES FROM STEPHEN

 

The season of Advent is rich with music expressing longing, waiting, impending joy, and celebration. Below are a few examples of anthems and motets that will be performed within Sunday Eucharists by the Christ Church Choir and at Compline by the Schola Cantorum.  

 

Oculi omnium                                                   Charles Wood (1866-1926)

 

Translation: The eyes of all wait upon thee, [O Lord]; and thou givest them their meat in due season.

Thou openest thine hand, and satisfiest the desire of every living thing. Alleluia.

For my flesh is meat indeed, and my blood is drink indeed.

He that eateth my flesh, and drinketh my blood, dwelleth in me, and I in him.Alleluia.

 

Tollite hostias                                                      Camille Saint-Saëns (1835-1921)

Translation: Raise the hosts, and worship God in his holy court. 

May the heaven rejoice, and may the earth dance before the face of God, for He comes. 

Hallelujah!

 

Veni redemptor gentium                                     Jacob Handl (1550-1591)

Translation: Come, redeemer of the peoples, and show the birth from a Virgin; every age shall acclaimthat such a birth befits God.

 

The Lamb                                                              John Tavener (1944-2013)

Little Lamb who made thee 

Dost thou know who made thee 

Gave thee life & bid thee feed. 

By the stream & o'er the mead; 

Gave thee clothing of delight, 

Softest clothing wooly bright; 

Gave thee such a tender voice, 

Making all the vales rejoice!  

Little Lamb who made thee 

Dost thou know who made thee  

Little Lamb I'll tell thee, 

He is called by thy name, 

For he calls himself a Lamb: 

He is meek & he is mild, 

He became a little child: 

I a child & thou a lamb, 

We are called by his name. 

Little Lamb God bless thee.  

 

Ave Maria                                                               Camille Saint-Saëns (1835-1921)

Translation: Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou among women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and in the hour of our death. Amen.

Stephen Kennedy
Music Director
Christ Church Rochester
Instructor of Sacred Music
Eastman School of Music

Bonus!

This improvisation attempts to reflect the bold themes of the Martin Luther’s text of “Nun comma, der Heiden Heiland” which is based on text of Ambrose of Milan (340-397).  All verses of this hymn are not in our hymnal but are listed here as translated by William M. Reynolds.

1 Savior of the nations, come, 
virgin's Son, make here Thy home!
Marvel now, O heav'n and earth,
that the Lord chose such a birth.

2 Not by human flesh and blood,
but the Spirit of our God,
was the Word of God made flesh--
woman's Offspring, pure and fresh.

3 Wondrous birth! O wondrous Child
Of the Virgin undefiled!
Though by all the world disowned,
still to be in heav'n enthroned.

4 From the Father forth He came
and returneth to the same,
captive leading death and hell--
high the song of triumph swell!

5 Thou the Father's only Son,
hast o'er sin the vict'ry won.
Boundless shall Thy kingdom be;
when shall we its glories see?

6 Brightly doth Thy manger shine,
glorious is its light divine.
Let not sin o'ercloud this light;
ever be our faith thus bright.

7 Praise to God the Father sing,
Praise to God the Son, our King,
Praise to God the Spirit be
Ever and eternally. 

 

(I call it Awesome!)

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EVENTS

EVENTS and ANNOUNCEMENTS in This Issue

Upcoming Music Event Poster

Lessons and Carols

3rd Sunday Lecture series with Nancy Norwood "What about Joseph?"

      Latest Sunday Bulletin and Audio of the 11:00 am Eucharist

(when you click on an image below it will become full size and you can scroll through the pages)

 Minute Ministries

Candlelight Concert Schedule 2017-2018

Episcopal Relief and Development

The Care Team

GRANTS UPDATE

Vestry Minutes


Episcopal Relief and Development

How about some lovely farm animals as a gift this Christmas? Or maybe a nice micro loan? I have to admit that I've never put farm animals on my list of things to get. I'm actually not a fan of farm animals. I have, however, wished for a micro loan, back in the day when we were a younger family. The opportunity to be creative is something that is so close sometimes, yet just out of reach for some of us. This is particularly true if you live in a place where food security is more hope than reality. A lot of people live in that place. It's not always just about location. Helping people make their hopes of opportunity come true this Christmas may be the very thing God is asking you to do. If you are inclined to want to make this a farm animal Christmas for someone who has this at the top of their wish list, check this out- http://www.episcopalrelief.org


The Care Team

is here to help

 

The Christ Church Care Team is a volunteer ministry to help parishioners on a temporary basis as they recover from surgery, suffer the death of a loved one, are home bound or in the hospital, or need support due to another kind of loss or difficult transition. The Care Team assists parishioners in need with the following: shopping, meals, pet care, house help, phone calls to check in, and home and hospital visits. Please notify the Rector if you or someone you know could use Care Team support. [Care Team Leaders: Shirley Ricker, Norma Kurmis, Lydia Worboys, Peg Britt, Elizabeth Dugdale, Kyle Liddell and Jim Blake]


Grants Update

WE GOT GRANTS!

GRANT UPDATE- December 19, 2017

 

The Christ Church grant team is thrilled to announce that the church was granted a New York State historical preservation grant for just over $106,000. The grant team applied for these funds to fix the six clerestory windows, which have damaged sills, frames, and panes, and therefore have let water into the building, which is partially responsible for the piece of the ceiling that fell from the North Aisle a couple of years ago. (The other element responsible was the roof on that aisle, which has already been repaired.) This work will be scheduled for Summer 2020. The grant team was inspired by the successful application by Ron Vukman to get a similar grant from NYS in 2009. It is rare to get a second grant in such a short time, and the grant team is grateful to everyone who helped by supplying us with information, especially Stephen Kennedy and Norm Geil. We are also so grateful for our partners Meal & More and The Father’s House, whose leadership wrote supporting letters to us, and to those in the community who also wrote letters supporting our application. 

 

Deb VanderBilt is also especially grateful to Val Jutsum, who happened to be at home within reach of her phone at the moment before Deb hit the “Submit” button on the grant website. Val and Deb claimed the verse “where 2 or 3 are gathered” and prayed for a successful outcome.  : )   Thanks to the whole grant team:  Deb VanderBilt, Tom Foster, Meg Mackey, Peg Britt, and Hugh Kierig.

 

This brings our grant total for repair work to $148,000.  These grant funds will go a long way toward helping the church pay for repair of the Lawn St. wall and the Nave repair and repainting projects.

Below is the original posting about our Grant process and hopes. I left it in to underline how wonderfully these prayers were answered.-ed.

 

old news

[The grant-writing team (Deb VanderBilt, Tom Foster, Meg Mackey, Peg Britt, and Hugh Kierig) has finished this year’s round of applications. In general, grants are available in the historic preservation category; in other words, we have to specify a building project and the grant will go toward repairs. Here’s an update on where we are with our grants.

 

In January, we applied for a grant from Sacred Sites (a part of the New York Conservancy Trust) for $50,000 for our buckling wall on Lawn Street. We received $25,000, which the grant administrator told us is typically the upper limit of what they award. We must match that grant 50-50 (no problem, since the wall repairs will cost at least $130K).

 

In May, we applied for two grants for the wall as well: to the Rochester Community Foundation Grant for $25,000 and to the Partners for Sacred Places for an unspecified amount (the first step is a “letter of intent”). We should hear from RCF in October, and we already heard we did not make the first cut from Partners for Sacred Places.

 

In July, we applied to New York State for a Historic Preservation Grant. Because our church is in a zip code that is characterized by high poverty, if we get this grant it will be a 75/25 match (we pay 25%). We applied for the grant for clerestory window repair, since the criterion for the grant is urgency. Water infiltration caused part of the ceiling under these leaky windows to fall down, so we believe we have a good case that window repairs are urgent. The application was for about $120,000, and we will hear in January about whether or not we receive it. 

 

We also applied in May for a Congregational Development Grant from the Diocese. This grant can be used for our deficit, so it is very different from the historic preservation grants. If we get it, we are eligible to be on a 5-year cycle of grant renewal, but it will be less each year as we work toward sustainability. To apply for the grant, the team worked on a plan of action to “develop” our congregation: communicating better about what we do to the community and other ways of growing our congregation. We applied for $35,000 and we will hear in September or October from the diocese if we get the grant.  They can say no, give the full amount we asked for, or give a lesser amount based on the total they have to allocate within the diocese.

 

It’s because of this final grant that Ruth, Deb, and Joe were required to attend the College for Congregational Development, to learn tools that will help us grow Christ Church both “inside,” in what we do to develop spiritual lives and fellowship in our church, and outside, in what we do to live out our mission and attract others to work with us on that mission.]


Vestry Minutes,  November 2017

 

Vestry Minutes November 21, 2017

 

1. UPDATES:

a. Nominating Committee. We have not received any “yesses” to our requests to parishioners. Deb has written a job description that can be used when telling people who are not familiar with what the Vestry does about the position.

 

b. Amsden Fund: Bishop Singh has recommended a seminarian for us to support with Amsden funds. She will be sending her spiritual autobiography.

 

c. Diocesan Convention report: Deb’s report has been published in the SONG. Hannah Sommers presented a stirring talk on “What does faith mean to you?” Deb is our current parish rep to convention, and encourages others to self-nominate as delegates next year.

 

2. REPORT FROM LIAISONS 

a. Peg Britt reported to Vestry on Outreach

 

RAIHN - Beatrice  Deshommes

• Thanks to CC members who showed support for RAIHN’s  biggestfundraiser event  “CAR CITY”.

• RAIHN is always looking in need of volunteers

• Bea is arranging for CC and Two Saints to meet to create networking opportunities, hoping for once or twice per year

 

JAZZ FESTIVAL,  SCHOOL #9 - Vicki McCutchon

• Vicki strategized with Ruth to discuss how to get better participation with requests for items for Meal and More Christmas bags, as well as for the ongoing food collections for both M&M and the Pittsford Food Cupboard.

• 2017 was a successful year with 10 weddings.  There are 8 weddings set so far for 2018, and at this time there are 6 paid for and 1 tentative wedding date.

• CC is not as involved with school #9 as in years past.  #9 is happy to report that lots of churches are helping the school out at this time.  We do contribute fall school bags along with CC Pittsford, and Vicki touches base with CC Pittsford a few times a year to see if #9 is in need of any items or reading tutors.

ANGEL TREES - Eleanor Peet

• CC will be doing the Angel Trees again this year for 2 weeks in Dec.

b. Report from Communications: The communications committee has been meeting and working on improvements for FB and other communication venues.

3. PROPERTY UPDATES

• Val reported on the lighting meeting with Illuminfx. The meeting was attended by Alan Jones, John Fields, Stephen Kennedy, Kyle, and Val. Illuminfx will send ideas so we can talk more. Val will send them an e-mail stressing urgent need for a ball park figure. Finding ways to light beauty which we cannot see was discussed, as were types of bulbs, replacement timing, burning out problems, and how to obtain a lift to reach them were discussed tonight. Kyle will look into lift options.

• Also discussed was the walk through which John Fields had with persons involved with community development, on the day before the vestry meeting. Kyle will seek a report on what happened.

4. CAPITAL CAMPAIGN UPDATE: Work “behind the scenes” continues, currently with materials being drafted for various audiences. Joe made a motion for the vestry approve a $20,000 budget request to cover consultant/ copy/printing/collateral materials. Carolyn seconded. The motion passed, unanimously. 

Ruth is drafting a campaign prayer.

5. VESTRY ON CALL: There have been comments on the length of the Sunday service. A longer service pushes back coffee hour, which then affects Meal and More. Efficient and friendly sharing of space is the goal. 

Also, improvements to the bulletin were discussed. Carolyn and Kristy Liddell will champion this cause. 

6. RECTOR’S TIME: Ruth spoke of a number of newcomers. Their varied interests spotlight the wide variety of spiritual expressions which make Christ Church so vibrant. 

Lucie offered the closing prayer. Congratulations to Jim Kurmis, who had just become a Great Uncle. He is bringing cookies to the December meeting. Now, that’s an action item.

Respectfully submitted, Dec. 4. 2017 by David C. Jutsum.

 

 

Pentecost and All Saints 2017

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Christ Church, please welcome our NEWEST sub-deacon, Jim Blake, and our NEWEST acolyte, Monesty Howard.  Thanks to Jim and Monesty for answering the Appeal for Altar Crew volunteers!

Christ Church, please welcome our NEWEST sub-deacon, Jim Blake, and our NEWEST acolyte, Monesty Howard.

Thanks to Jim and Monesty for answering the Appeal for Altar Crew volunteers!

For all the saints, who from their labors rest,
who thee by faith before the world confessed,
thy Name, O Jesus, be forever blessed.
Alleluia, Alleluia!

Thou wast their rock, their fortress and their might;
thou, Lord, their Captain in the well-fought fight;
thou, in the darkness drear, the one true Light.
Alleluia, Alleluia!

 O may thy soldiers, faithful, true, and bold, fight as the saints who nobly fought of old, and win with them, the victors crown of gold.
Alleluia, Alleluia!

O blest communion, fellowship divine!
We feebly struggle, they in glory shine
yet all are one in thee, for all are thine.
Alleluia, Alleluia!

And when the strife is fierce, the warfare long,
steals on the ear the distant triumph song,
and hearts are brave, again, and arms are strong.
Alleluia, Alleluia!

The golden evening brightens in the west;
soon, soon to faithful warriors cometh rest;
sweet is the calm of paradise the blest.
Alleluia, Alleluia!

But lo! there breaks a yet more glorious day;
the saints triumphant rise in bright array;
the King of glory passes on his way.
Alleluia, Alleluia!

From earth's wide bounds, from ocean's farthest coast,
through gates of pearl streams in the countless host,
singing to Father, Son, and Holy Ghost:
Alleluia, Alleluia! 

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Editor note: Members of our Stewardship team have been sharing heartfelt thoughts regarding Christ Church, and this seems a great place to highlight them. We have Joe Schaller, Pru Kirkpatrick, Steve Remy, and John and Kathy D'Amanda. 

 

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Because I believe in the grace of God, and all that it implies in my present life, and a life hereafter, it is my only reasonable response to be grateful for God’s grace. Gratitude is an action word. It’s not a slogan, not something that merely receives an occasional nod and a few words of thank you Lord for what you have given me. Gratitude is a call to action. And like many things spiritual, meaning God centered, it’s a call to taking inconvenient actions. Actions which rub against my nature for a life free of responsibilities. It’s a call to leave my own personal garden of Eden.

It is my experience that the strength of our church body, is that it nourishes my soul.  And it is only through this nourishment that I can transform my reluctance, my hesitation, and my proclivity to whine into a service rendered with a grateful and cheerful heart. It is the power of love in our Eucharist that is gifted to me, not in isolation, but as given to all. 

I believe that all God-centered spiritual activity plays out in our physical reality. Faith is found in community and as a community we have chosen to meet and worship here for more than 100 years. We believe it is God’s call on our lives. We believe that we have a legacy which God would have us to continue to refine and improve and to carry out with gratitude for his grace. 

Christ Church has also is given me a connection to a community of believers so that I may stand with a light in my hand in a world of great darkness. The Holy Spirit has lit the candle, but so have you.  Christ Church has given me a profound spiritually-based liturgy. It has given me the loving and powerful word of the good news of the gospel: exclaimed from our pulpit by a minister dedicated to the betterment of all, including our community both near and far. It is given me a soaring and majestic music which tells me that we can aspire to be what God has called us to do.  

By making a commitment to our annual stewardship program I am linking up my hands, with you in Christ.  I give secure in the knowledge that I have answered the call of God in my life. I stand here this morning because I have received, from God and through you, the courage to take the halting and inconvenient and maybe in some cases dangerous steps that that call of God’s will as expressed in this body requires of me. I give to the best of my ability. I give my talent, my time, my treasure. I give to give. I do not give to get. I am redeemed whether I give or not. That is a great joy! Giving is an expression of my gratitude for that great joy and for your steadfast and holy fellowship. Giving is an action word!

Joseph Schaller

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We are standing on the shoulders of giants. I am reminded of this when I enter our building at the Lawn Street entrance and walk past the portraits of the clergy, past and present, or when I read the "In memory of..." plaques in the sanctuary. These persons, working with generations of devoted parishioners, managed to ensure that Christ Church survived and thrived the many vicissitudes of the past 160 years. Now we find ourselves uniquely positioned to be Christ's light in our world. We have been given enough. In the of my favorite Offertory Sentence, "All things come of thee, O Lord, and of thine own have we given thee."

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                                                                                                    -- Sonja Shelton

Hannah Sommers ©2011  watercolor

Hannah Sommers ©2011  watercolor

Ruth's column

 

“O blest communion, fellowship divine!

We feebly struggle, they in glory shine;

Yet all are one in thee in thee,

For all are thine.

Alleluia, alleluia!”

 

  • Hymn #287, “For all the saints, who from their labors rest”

 

As many of you know, I fully engage in that hallmark of our Anglican identity, which is openness to ambiguity! My faith is as much about the love of questions as the certainties. When it comes to All Saints Day, I am blessed with certainty.  For as long as I can remember, it has never occurred to me that the people I love who have died don’t hear me when I pray for them.  In fact, before I was taught anything different, I used to pray TO my grandmother. She was the first person I loved and lost. We called her “Angel.” 

For a time after Angel died, she became a regular fixture in my bed time prayer routine. After the Lord’s Prayer, I would give my attention to Angel. I went through God, of course.  I asked God to quiet the streets of heaven so that a message could get through and be heard by my grandmother. It never occurred to me that God didn’t quiet everyone in Heaven briefly to sound my message through the streets by broadcasting my own voice saying the words to Him: “Hi, Angel, it’s Ruth. How are you doing? I am doing fine. I miss you. I love you.”

All of these years later, it still does not occur to me that the ones I love and see no longer do not receive my prayers and join me there. It never occurs to me that we have not been knit together into one communion and fellowship in the mystical body of Christ.

I no longer picture cobbled, Heavenly streets with people bustling about but pausing when prayers and other announcements are given over the celestial intercom. When I am in that space where wordless, contemplative prayer delivers me, I am one with the God who is all in all. All who came before, all who are now, all who will come after; all of time, before time, and beyond time; all of what we can see, know, or believe and all of what we can’t see, know or believe.  The mystics call this “unitive seeing,” but it’s not reserved for mystics only. In this seeing, or “space,” I know beyond any doubt that I am communing with God in whom we live, move and have our being, and communing with all being that lives, moves, and has itself in God! 

Baptisms, Eucharists, music, prayer, liturgies – these guide us to the crossroads, the touch stone,  of the Saints in Heaven and on Earth. But Heaven and earth are also joined together within us when we give ourselves fully over to the presence of God. I no longer envision a veil between Heaven and earth that is temporarily lifted from time to time. I imagine that the great cloud of witnesses surrounding us is as near and present as Lawn Street is outside my office window. As are the saints of God, the souls of our loved ones died to this life, we ourselves and every other living thing that fills the overflowing cup who is God.

See you in church,

Ruth+

 

Did you know that Ruth has a blog? It's beautiful and you can find it here-

https://christchurchrochester.tumblr.com/

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Notes from Stephen Kennedy

We celebrated All Saints at Christ Church at the Sunday Eucharist with two anthems from the 20th century. "Give Laud Unto the Lord" by Ernest Bullock (1890-1979), and "How Beauteous Are Their Feet", by Charles Villiers Stanford (1852-1924).  These sacred choral anthems are staples in the Anglican repertoire.  Their texts, outlined below, are rich in imagery of All Saints.  Sacred choral works such as these were not performable at Christ Church until the advent of the Hook & Hastings organ.  We are grateful for our collaboration withe the Eastman School of Music which has brought about the possibility of expanding our repertoire to include such works.

"Give Laud Unto the Lord"                            
Text: Give Laud Unto the Lord, from heaven that is so high. Praise him in deed and word, above the starry sky: an also ye his Angels, all, armies royal, praise joyfully. Ye boundless realms of joy, exalt your maker’s fame, his praise your song employ.  Ye Cherubim and Seraphim, to sing his praise.

"How Beauteous Are Their Feet" 
Text: How beauteous are their feet
who stand on Zion's hill
who bring salvation on their tongues
and words of peace instil! How happy are our ears
that hear this joyful sound
which kings and prophets waited for
and sought, but never found. How blessèd are our eyes
that see this heavenly light
Prophets and kings desired it long
but died without the sight. The Lord makes bare his arm
through all the earth abroad
let every nation now behold
their Savior and their God.


Stephen Kennedy
Music Director
Christ Church Rochester
Instructor of Sacred Music
Eastman School of Music

"Cobbs Hill"  Tim Jutsum©2006 acrylic on canvas

"Cobbs Hill"  Tim Jutsum©2006 acrylic on canvas

EVENTS

EVENTS and ANNOUNCEMENTS in This Issue

Upcoming Event Music Poster

      Latest Sunday Bulletin 

(when you click on an image below it will become full size and you can scroll through the pages)

Baptism on All Saints Sunday

Report on the Diocesan Convention 

Candlelight Concert Schedule 2017-2018

Old News, but Good News

Meet the new VanDelinder Fellows for 2017

Episcopal Relief and Development

The Care Team

Christ Church Open House

GRANTS UPDATE

Vestry Minutes

1 Crown him with many crowns,                                 2 Crown him the Son of God
the Lamb upon his throne;                                             before the worlds began,
Hark! how the heavenly anthem drowns                    and ye, who tread where he hath trod, 
all music but its own;                                                      crown him the Son of man;
awake, my soul, and sing of him                                  who every grief hath known
who died for thee,                                                           that wrings the human breast,
and hail him as thy matchless King                              and takes and bears them for his own,
through all eternity.                                                         that all in him may rest.

3 Crown him the Lord of life,                                      4 Crown him of lords the Lord, 
who triumphed over the grave,                                     who over all doth reign,
and rose victorious in the strife                                     who once on earth, the incarnate Word, 
for those he came to save;                                               for ransomed sinners slain,
his glories now we sing,                                                  now lives in realms of light, 
who died, and rose on high,                                           where saints with angels sing
who died, eternal life to bring,                                       their songs before him day and night, 
and lives that death may die.                                         their God, Redeemer, King.

5 Crown him the Lord of heaven,
enthroned in worlds above;
crown him the King,to whom is given, 
the wondrous name of Love.
Crown him with many crowns,
as thrones before him fall,
crown him, ye kings, with many crowns,
for he is King of all.

All Saints Sunday Johan Riley Blackman received the sacrament of Holy Baptism

We rejoice and welcome Johan into the family of God at Christ Church and congratulate his family.

Report on Diocesan Convention

Report on Diocesan Convention 2017

I had the pleasure of representing Christ Church at this year’s Diocesan Convention, which was held at RIT on October 28th. The convention passed two significant resolutions. 

 

The first was brought by Roja Singh and Dawn Gandell, “Against Caste-and Descent-Based Discrimination 2017.” Roja mentioned how a large majority (around 70%) of Christians in India are Dalits, or so-called “Untouchables.” The resolution asked that the Episcopal Diocese of New York “acknowledge the fundamental injustice of caste-and descent-based discrimination, a clear human rights violation; engage in legislative advocacy and education to raise awareness of the pervasive nature of this human rights violation; and that the Episcopal Diocese of New York charge the India Network with the preparation of an e-mail document outlining caste-and descent-based discrimination and the atrocities associated with it, such document to be distributed to all Diocesan parishes before the next Convention of the Episcopal Diocese of New York.”  The resolution passed and will be forwarded to the National Convention for their approval as well.

 

The second resolution was that the South Wedge Mission be entered into union with the Diocese of Rochester. The South Wedge Mission is a congregation supported jointly by the Lutheran Church and Episcopal Diocese of Rochester. It is accepted as a mission church, and “agrees to abide by and conform to all canonical and legal requirements of mission churches in union” with the Diocese of Rochester. You can find a wonderful description by Rev. Matthew Nickoloff of how the mission has grown and all their activities on the Diocesan website. 

http://www.episcopalrochester.org/sites/default/files/RESOLUTION%20B%20-%20South%20Wedge%20Mission-2.pdf

The Convention was livelier than in the past, in my opinion. In addition to the business of the day (approving the audit report, passing the budget, and electing people to Diocesan committees), the Diocese had ministry highlights from various congregations on videos produced by our new Communications Specialist Steve Richards. And there were some other informal but informational presentations, one presenting the work and objectives of an anti-racism group in Rochester, and one featuring Diocesan young people speaking about what faith means to them. All the kids were excellent speakers and had great things to say, and our own Hannah Sommers was the final speaker in the group.  She talked about her experiences in the church that help her say “I am not afraid for the future of the church” because she’s seen people act in faith outside church walls: she talked about her trip to Standing Rock and witnessing others going to court and advocating for refugees and migrants. She was so articulate and passionate, and she got a standing ovation!  And there were multiple moments of worship, prayer, and getting to know our table mates from all over the Diocese.

 

We will be looking for three delegates for next year’s convention. Please consider spending a fulfilling day in the company of Episcopalians from all over the Finger Lakes region of New York. It’s a wonderful opportunity!  --Deb VanderBilt


Candlelight Concerts, Compline, and Music Events

at Christ Church 2017-2018

Old News, but, Good News

This is some of the things that happened during the summer and in previous weeks. Some are things that you may have already seen and know about and others may be new to you. Seeing them as memories or for the first time reminds us of the many wonderful things that we shared. Cheers!

Pet Blessing

The Feast of St. Francis, October 4th, was the inspiration for the blessing of our pets as a part of the liturgy at the 11:00 on October 8th.

Goodbye, Marianne!

Jazz Fest

Report to the Rector, Wardens, and Vestry

2017 Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival

Made in the U.K. Series

 

Each year for nine days at the end of June, the East End becomes this Musical Oasis with thousands walking in the neighborhood enjoying all sorts of good music, good food and drink, and the kind of community spirit that makes a city a good place to be.  Since 2008, Christ Church has been a major part of this annual event known as The Xerox Rochester International Jazz Festival, considered to be one of the top four in the USA.  We welcome 6,000 people through our doors for two performances each evening and our front lawn becomes a place for people to relax and enjoy music emanating from the free stages and other locations.  This year, A Meal & More held a successful earring sale on our front lawn to support their food ministry to this neighborhood all year long.  

 

Our participation in XRIJF began in 2008, and the first year we were designated the venue for Made in the UK was 2009.  Prior to that, the parish hosted a jazz-style mass as our neighborhood participation.  XRIJF is the largest public event at Christ Church each year.

 

The attendance figures for the 2017 XRIJF are as follows:

 

No other event draws this kind of attendance, and no other event involves nine straight days.  When we first got together with the Jazz Festival people, our intent was for this to be a major Public Relations/Community event.  Fund raising was not a part of the decision, but we were intent that it be “revenue neutral” or our out-of-pocket expenses be minimal.  Our current agreement calls for a $1,500 payment from the Festival for Moses’ extra time and paper supplies for the bathrooms.  The Festival pays Adamski Moving directly to move the piano and Mitch Moore from Eastman to tune the piano daily during the Festival.  Our out-of-pocket expenses are the cost of additional water and electricity.  This is approximately $50 for the water and less than $100 for the electricity.

 

We are staffed by a loyal crew of volunteers – about 5 each night – to usher, give out bottled water (which this year resulted in $400 of donations), and watch over the nave and hallways.  About 2/3 are parishioners.  We can say with absolute certainty that people regard Christ Church as one of the top venues and the most hospitable.  We know the British musicians feel this way, as we have received high praise in such publications as British Downbeat magazine and in what they say here and abroad.  Each night, we conduct several tours of interested people and after each performance we hear very kind words about the beauty of the church and how well we treat festival-goers.  Several of the ensembles are interviewed by the newspapers and television stations with flattering shots of our building, and committee members are likewise called upon for TV interviews.  We also give the opening announcements each evening at both shows and use this as an opportunity to invite people back to see us after the Festival.  Between XRIJF print and web material, the news media, and word on the street, the name “Christ Church” and its beauty is constantly in front of the community for nine days each June!

 

Our involvement as an XRIJF venue began at the same time the Craighead-Saunders Organ was being installed.  We believed that this unique organ would draw a great deal of local, national, and international attention to Christ Church.  Opening our doors to a major music festival would be yet another opportunity for the parish to showcase its building and its community to a large audience.  Our experience over the years has taught us that more people than we can imagine have a very positive image of Christ Church and its role in the Downtown Community, especially in the area of music and the fine arts.  We are limited only by our imagination to further exploit such opportunities.

 

Looking ahead to 2018 and beyond, we look for suggestions as to how we might improve our participation and also how to best work with things like potential repairs to the nave.

Respectfully submitted,

Joe and Vicki McCutchon, Carlos Mercado

Ad hoc Jazz Festival Committee

 

Here is the link to an excellent documentary on Made in the UK: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=efcH47HYh0U


Meet Our VanDelinder Fellows for 2017-2018

More about the Roy E. VanDelinder, Jr. Fellowship Program at Christ Church Rochester.

Through the combined resources of Christ Church’s Liturgical Music Program and the Eastman School of Music’s Organ Department, this exciting program offers vocational training and practical application in liturgical music skills for Eastman organ students who are pursuing a career in liturgical music. Fellows will receive a scholarship for participating in this program, and a large cash prize is awarded each year to the Fellow who demonstrates the greatest diligence and achievement. Under the leadership of Music Director Stephen Kennedy, Fellows will receive training and experience in improvising, composing, arranging, hymn playing, anthem and motet accompaniment, chanting, conducting, and rehearsing choirs and instrumentalists as well as other components within a church music program. This program is made possible by a generous gift from the Roy E. VanDelinder, Jr. Fund of Rochester Area Community Foundation.

Fellowship in Liturgical Organ Studies

Fellows will be selected by the VanDelinder Committee.  This committee will base their decision on the student’s résumé, playing skills, and two letters of recommendation. Fellows will receive a scholarship of around $4,700 for the academic year.  This amount will be re-figured this year, so it may be slightly more than this amount.  Fellows may participate in this program for up to three years but the VanDelinder Committee makes the selection of Fellows each year.  

Prize in Liturgical Organ Skills

Each year, the VanDelinder Committee will select one acting Fellow to receive the Roy E. VanDelinder, Jr. Prize in Liturgical Organ Skills that includes a cash prize of $8,000 above the scholarship. This prize will be awarded to the VanDelinder Fellow that demonstrates the greatest diligence and achievement. The prizewinner will be expected to remain in active duty as Fellow for a negotiated number of Sundays beyond the school term.  Fellows who do not win the prize will be excused at the end of the school term. 

Past Winners of the Roy E. VanDelinder, Jr. Fund of Rochester Area Community Foundation Prize in Liturgical Organ Skills

Käthe Wright Kaufman in 2014

Käthe Wright Kaufman in 2015

Jeremy Jelinek in 2016

Madeleine Woodworth in 2017


Episcopal Relief and Development

How about some lovely farm animals as a gift this Christmas? Or maybe a nice micro loan? I have to admit that I've never put farm animals on my list of things to get. I'm actually not a fan of farm animals. I have, however, wished for a micro loan, back in the day when we were a younger family. The opportunity to be creative is something that is so close sometimes, yet just out of reach for some of us. This is particularly true if you live in a place where food security is more hope than reality. A lot of people live in that place. It's not always just about location. Helping people make their hopes of opportunity come true this Christmas may be the very thing God is asking you to do. If you are inclined to want to make this a farm animal Christmas for someone who has this at the top of their wish list, check this out- http://www.episcopalrelief.org


The Care Team

is here to help

 

The Christ Church Care Team is a volunteer ministry to help parishioners on a temporary basis as they recover from surgery, suffer the death of a loved one, are home bound or in the hospital, or need support due to another kind of loss or difficult transition. The Care Team assists parishioners in need with the following: shopping, meals, pet care, house help, phone calls to check in, and home and hospital visits. Please notify the Rector if you or someone you know could use Care Team support. [Care Team Leaders: Shirley Ricker, Norma Kurmis, Lydia Worboys, Peg Britt, Elizabeth Dugdale, Kyle Liddell and Jim Blake]


Christ Church Open House- Sacred Sites

Dear Christ Church,

Thank you to all who made our Stained Glass open house a big success!  We had about 70 visitors, including a group of 40 on a group tour led by Pike Studios, and they were unbelievably enthusiastic--asked a million questions, took a million pictures--in fact, the tour guide couldn't get them out of there and on to their next venue!

 

The volunteers made this open house possible. They were welcoming and generous hosts.  I've attached 2 pictures--one which Vicki McCutchon entered into the Sacred Sites Photo Contest after the weekend, and one which shows the beautiful way Carlos set up the front of the church.

 

Huge kudos and thanks to all who helped.

Deb VanderBilt

Warden

Grants Update

 

The grant-writing team (Deb VanderBilt, Tom Foster, Meg Mackey, Peg Britt, and Hugh Kierig) has finished this year’s round of applications. In general, grants are available in the historic preservation category; in other words, we have to specify a building project and the grant will go toward repairs. Here’s an update on where we are with our grants.

 

In January, we applied for a grant from Sacred Sites (a part of the New York Conservancy Trust) for $50,000 for our buckling wall on Lawn Street. We received $25,000, which the grant administrator told us is typically the upper limit of what they award. We must match that grant 50-50 (no problem, since the wall repairs will cost at least $130K).

 

In May, we applied for two grants for the wall as well: to the Rochester Community Foundation Grant for $25,000 and to the Partners for Sacred Places for an unspecified amount (the first step is a “letter of intent”). We should hear from RCF in October, and we already heard we did not make the first cut from Partners for Sacred Places.

 

In July, we applied to New York State for a Historic Preservation Grant. Because our church is in a zip code that is characterized by high poverty, if we get this grant it will be a 75/25 match (we pay 25%). We applied for the grant for clerestory window repair, since the criterion for the grant is urgency. Water infiltration caused part of the ceiling under these leaky windows to fall down, so we believe we have a good case that window repairs are urgent. The application was for about $120,000, and we will hear in January about whether or not we receive it. 

 

We also applied in May for a Congregational Development Grant from the Diocese. This grant can be used for our deficit, so it is very different from the historic preservation grants. If we get it, we are eligible to be on a 5-year cycle of grant renewal, but it will be less each year as we work toward sustainability. To apply for the grant, the team worked on a plan of action to “develop” our congregation: communicating better about what we do to the community and other ways of growing our congregation. We applied for $35,000 and we will hear in September or October from the diocese if we get the grant.  They can say no, give the full amount we asked for, or give a lesser amount based on the total they have to allocate within the diocese.

 

It’s because of this final grant that Ruth, Deb, and Joe were required to attend the College for Congregational Development, to learn tools that will help us grow Christ Church both “inside,” in what we do to develop spiritual lives and fellowship in our church, and outside, in what we do to live out our mission and attract others to work with us on that mission.

 

It’s also in connection with the Diocesan grant that you took the survey about what attracted you to Christ Church and why you stay. Here are the results of that survey (except the comments, which even though anonymous we are treating as confidential:

 

Member Survey: 63 responses

 

Question 1: What caused you to visit Christ Church for a church service (other than Compline) the first time? (Click all that apply)

I was looking for a faith community 50.00% 26

Heard about it from someone I know 46.15% 24

Found it through the website 13.46% 7

Was in the neighborhood and was curious 13.46% 7

Attended Compline, then came to a service 7.69% 4

Read about it in the newspaper 1.92% 1

Found it via Facebook 1.92% 1 

Attended Jazz Festival then came to a service 0.00% 0

Question 2: What was it about Christ Church that caused you to attend regularly or become a member? (Click all that apply.)

The music 70.4% 43 

The preaching 63.9% 39 

The Christ Church community 59.0% 36 

The way the service is conducted (the liturgy) 57.3% 35

The physical space (Sanctuary) 47.5% 29

The outreach initiatives of Christ Church 34.4% 21

Question 3: If you had to pick a PRIMARY reason why you attend Christ Church regularly or are a member, what would you pick?

The music 26.6% 16 

The Christ Church community 26.6% 16 

The liturgy 20% 12 

The preaching 18.3% 11 

*Question 3 responses by those at CC 8 or fewer years: 

The preaching 31% 9 

The Christ Church community 24.1% 7 

The music 20.6% 6 

The liturgy 17.2% 5


Vestry Minutes,  October 2017

 

Vestry Minutes October 17, 2017

 

1. Report from Treasurer: Vestry welcome Norm Geil for his quarterly visit to the Vestry. He noted an end of month surplus in March and April. He is anticipating that Quickbooks will generate a statement of contributions, according to the expectations of the Quickbooks consultant working on our system. A third checking account has been opened for the Capital Campaign. The Vestry decided to hold an open budget meeting to promote transparency, along with a 15 minute tutorial on how to read budgets. The meeting will be Dec. 7.

 

2. Capital Campaign Committee Report by Joe Schaller

Committee members: Ruth Ferguson; Gale Lynch; Lucy Parfitt; Joe Schaller, Bill Soleim; John Urban; Deb Vanderbilt

A Gift & a Promise

Goal: $1,000,000

Contributions: $107,500

Pct. of Goal: 11%

 

• Mailing to the neighborhood: Sagamore, Gibbs/Selden St. neighborhood, Tower 280, and Manhattan Square Apartments. Approximately 100 pieces were mailed. Purpose of the mailing was to inform nearby residents of programs at Christ Church. Included in the mailing was a note from the Rector, a card listing programs and a Schola Cantorum CD. 

• Farash Foundation: A tour with the Executive Director will be scheduled. The foundation has previously made a grant to Christ Church and we will request a second grant.

Case statement – with capital projects

• Case statements for multiple audiences were previously completed, to be used in the solicitation of external organizations/individuals. 

• A State of Christ Church working draft is being reviewed.

• Capital projects were prioritized. Total cost of projects will equal the campaign goal of $1 million.

• A limited Conditions Report for our project areas from Bero is expected in the next 6 weeks. This is a very important step in presenting our case for support especially from the community, who know less about the state of our building.

Campaign Policies

• Completed policies were presented to the Vestry for approval

• Naming/Recognition policy being finalized

3. Deb moved that policies for the Capital Campaign donations be approved by the Vestry. Val seconded. Motion passed unanimously.  

4. Vestry Liaison Reports 

Reports from Vicki regarding special events, weddings, and meals:

 

• Right now Vicki has 5 weddings paid for in-full for 2018. The goal is 8 weddings for 2018, which would bring in $12,000 total. Vicki has overseen 7 weddings this year and one included a small reception.

• Vicki does not need further resources at this point, and reports that she loves working with Moses and Stephen, and is also happy to have Lydia as a backup as needed.

 

Report on Care Team—Ruth 

 

• The Care Team was split into different categories in July: Pet Care, Food Prep, Phone Calls, Home visits, Housekeeping, Hospital Visits

• Norma Kurmis took the lead on helping to organize volunteers for the food prep service. Meals have been brought to parishioners on a rotating basis since July. 

• The response from parishioners receiving meals has been mostly positive, with only a few hiccups in terms of communications.

 

Report on Foyers—Val 

Foyers has been on hiatus due to low turnout. Three parishioners signed up for the last round of foyers. We will advertise Foyers further in advance in 2018.

 

5. Rector’s time: A huge welcome to Pat Knapp, the new church secretary! Ruth is very excited to have her on board. 

n liturgy news, December 24th will be a full day at Christ Church. It is both Advent 4 AND Christmas Eve. There will be a 10 a.m. Advent 4 Eucharist; a 5:30 (said) Christmas Eve Eucharist and a 10:30 (sung) Eucharist. Also, Easter Vigil will be a joint venture this year with the clergy, choirs, and people of St. Thomas' and St. Paul's joining us. Rob Picken will sing the Exsultet, Leslie Burkhardt will preach, and Ruth will preside. The people of St. Thomas' and St. Paul's will share the lectern with us as readers, and members of both choirs will be invited to join the CC choir and the music performed under Stephen Kennedy's direction. The idea is that the Vigil, which has been shrinking in numbers for all three churches, will be a movable feast, and we will join St. Paul's next year and St. Thomas' the year after.

he last part of the meeting was given over to Evening Prayer. “Defend us from all dangers and mischiefs, and from the fear of them; that we may enjoy such refreshing sleep as may fit us for the duties of the coming day.”

 

Vestry Minutes September 2017

 

Vestry Minutes Tuesday, September 19, 201

1. Nominating Committee: Deb VanderBilt, Carolyn Mauro, and Meg Mackey will serve from Vestry, and Deb will recruit members from Parish. 

2. Worship Liaison report: Carolyn Mauro reported on needs of the groups for which she is liaison. 

• Altar Guild: Bill Soleim would like us to have one fair linen for each altar, totaling three. We currently have one. Ruth will suggest a fair linen for memorial gifts for those who inquire.

• More ushers would be helpful to the team. The teams are now two official ushers, with helpers to bring up the elements. Carolyn will consult with worship leaders again, after Advent and Christmas. 

3. Sponsorship Policy Proposal: The vestry passed a sponsorship policy proposal, for use of the church’s name in activities we want to sponsor officially. Any church member can request this, and we would ask them to follow the protocol (attached). 

4. Amsden Fund monies will be awarded to a seminarian, approximately $5,000. Ruth will work with the Bishop and the Diocesan Commission on Ministry on identifying a student with financial need.

5. Capital Campaign: Joe Schaller’s gave a report on the committee’s activies (which will be included in a handout to the parish). Deb reported that the outcome of vestry pledges was 100% participation. Combined number, including vestry pledges and two grants equals $107,450. If the vestry is representative of the entire parish (10 people pledging $65,450 = 100 people pledging $650,000), our goal of $1,000,000 is within reach!  

A new initiative coming out of Campaign discussions is the third Sunday Lecture Series beginning October 15, 8:15-8:45P.M. We will encourage people to attend, using every communication avenue we have!Ruth led the Vestry in a healing service in which each one had the opportunity for the laying on of hands in prayer, and anointing with oil.

The Spirit was moving, but the house was not shaken, which was a good thing, considering the Lawn St. wall and all. 

Vestry meetings as of October will begin at 7:00 P.M.

Respectfully submitted by David C. Jutsum, clerk of the vestry.

SPONSORSHIP GUIDELINES – Christ Church, Rochester NY

Passed by the Vestry on September 19, 2017

 

Purpose

Christ Church is committed to “justice and peace for all people,” according to our mission statement. The following policy outlines how Christ Church will proceed in sponsoring events or activities, including lending the name of Christ Church as an endorsing or sponsoring organization to another non-profit or its activities.

 

“Sponsorship” by Presence of Rector

The presence and voice of the Rector of Christ Church at events promoting social justice is within the individual rights of the Rector. This includes the Rector being associated with the church in media reports.

Sponsorship (in writing) of an Outside Organization by Proposal to the Vestry

Official sponsorship (in writing) of an event may be requested by any parishioner or the Rector. This might include co-sponsoring an event, providing rent-free space, placing an ad in a program, or hosting a fundraiser. If a special collection is part of the activity, the organization must be a 501(c)(3) organization.

A sponsorship proposal to the Vestry should be submitted to the Wardens and Rector:

• Briefly describe the activity, including date, time, location, and audience.

• State how the activity supports the Church’s mission.

• Estimate staff and/or volunteer time required, if any.

• Estimate the cost to the Church, if any.

• Indicate the duration of the sponsorship requested.

• Describe any potential for financial loss or other liability.

The Vestry will give priority to organizations whose mission is congruent with the Church’s mission. If approved, the sponsorship, when appropriate, should use wording that clarifies the sponsoring organization (“The Sanctuary Group” or “The Vestry”).

Other kinds of sponsorship

No advocacy or sponsorship of activities in support of political candidates or parties is allowed.

If sponsorship of an activity of an outside organization involves a contractual agreement, Vestry approval is required. Only the Rector is authorized to sign sponsorship contracts with outside organizations. 

 

Pentecost and Trinity 2017

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Prizes have been awarded to the VanDelinder Fellows for 2017

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More about the Roy E. VanDelinder, Jr. Fellowship Program at Christ Church Rochester.

Through the combined resources of Christ Church’s Liturgical Music Program and the Eastman School of Music’s Organ Department, this exciting program offers vocational training and practical application in liturgical music skills for Eastman organ students who are pursuing a career in liturgical music. Fellows will receive a scholarship for participating in this program, and a large cash prize is awarded each year to the Fellow who demonstrates the greatest diligence and achievement. Under the leadership of Music Director Stephen Kennedy, Fellows will receive training and experience in improvising, composing, arranging, hymn playing, anthem and motet accompaniment, chanting, conducting, and rehearsing choirs and instrumentalists as well as other components within a church music program. This program is made possible by a generous gift from the Roy E. VanDelinder, Jr. Fund of Rochester Area Community Foundation.

 

Fellowship in Liturgical Organ Studies

Fellows will be selected by the VanDelinder Committee.  This committee will base their decision on the student’s résumé, playing skills, and two letters of recommendation. Fellows will receive a scholarship of around $4,700 for the academic year.  This amount will be re-figured this year, so it may be slightly more than this amount.  Fellows may participate in this program for up to three years but the VanDelinder Committee makes the selection of Fellows each year.  

 

 

 

Prize in Liturgical Organ Skills

Each year, the VanDelinder Committee will select one acting Fellow to receive the Roy E. VanDelinder, Jr. Prize in Liturgical Organ Skills that includes a cash prize of $8,000 above the scholarship. This prize will be awarded to the VanDelinder Fellow that demonstrates the greatest diligence and achievement. The prizewinner will be expected to remain in active duty as Fellow for a negotiated number of Sundays beyond the school term.  Fellows who do not win the prize will be excused at the end of the school term. 

 

Past Winners of the Roy E. VanDelinder, Jr. Fund of Rochester Area Community Foundation Prize in Liturgical Organ Skills

 

Käthe Wright Kaufman in 2014

Käthe Wright Kaufman in 2015

Jeremy Jelinek in 2016

Madeleine Woodworth in 2017

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EVENTS

EVENTS and ANNOUNCEMENTS in This Issue

Candlelight Concert Schedule 2017-2018

Meet the new VanDelinder Fellows for 2017

The Care Team

Christ Church Open House

GRANTS UPDATE

Vestry Minutes

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Christ Church VanDelinder Fellows for the 2017-2018 season